cat theory: different bold
[lambda.git] / advanced_topics / monads_in_category_theory.mdwn
1 **Don't try to read this yet!!! Many substantial edits are still in process.
2 Will be ready soon.**
3
4 Caveats
5 -------
6 I really don't know much category theory. Just enough to put this
7 together. Also, this really is "put together." I haven't yet found an
8 authoritative source (that's accessible to a category theory beginner like
9 myself) that discusses the correspondence between the category-theoretic and
10 functional programming uses of these notions in enough detail to be sure that
11 none of the pieces here is misguided. In particular, it wasn't completely
12 obvious how to map the polymorphism on the programming theory side into the
13 category theory. And I'm bothered by the fact that our `<=<` operation is only
14 partly defined on our domain of natural transformations. But this does seem to
15 me to be the reasonable way to put the pieces together. We very much welcome
16 feedback from anyone who understands these issues better, and will make
17 corrections.
18
19
20 Monoids
21 -------
22 A **monoid** is a structure `(S, *, z)` consisting of an associative binary operation `*` over some set `S`, which is closed under `*`, and which contains an identity element `z` for `*`. That is:
23
24
25 <pre>
26         for all s1, s2, s3 in S:
27         (i) s1*s2 etc are also in S
28         (ii) (s1*s2)*s3 = s1*(s2*s3)
29         (iii) z*s1 = s1 = s1*z
30 </pre>
31
32 Some examples of monoids are:
33
34 *       finite strings of an alphabet `A`, with `*` being concatenation and `z` being the empty string
35 *       all functions `X->X` over a set `X`, with `*` being composition and `z` being the identity function over `X`
36 *       the natural numbers with `*` being plus and `z` being `0` (in particular, this is a **commutative monoid**). If we use the integers, or the naturals mod n, instead of the naturals, then every element will have an inverse and so we have not merely a monoid but a **group**.)
37 *       if we let `*` be multiplication and `z` be `1`, we get different monoids over the same sets as in the previous item.
38
39 Categories
40 ----------
41 A **category** is a generalization of a monoid. A category consists of a class of **elements**, and a class of **morphisms** between those elements. Morphisms are sometimes also called maps or arrows. They are something like functions (and as we'll see below, given a set of functions they'll determine a category). However, a single morphism only maps between a single source element and a single target element. Also, there can be multiple distinct morphisms between the same source and target, so the identity of a morphism goes beyond its "extension."
42
43 When a morphism `f` in category <b>C</b> has source `C1` and target `C2`, we'll write `f:C1->C2`.
44
45 To have a category, the elements and morphisms have to satisfy some constraints:
46
47 <pre>
48         (i) the class of morphisms has to be closed under composition: where f:C1->C2 and g:C2->C3, g o f is also a morphism of the category, which maps C1->C3.
49         (ii) composition of morphisms has to be associative
50         (iii) every element E of the category has to have an identity morphism 1<sub>E</sub>, which is such that for every morphism f:C1->C2: 1<sub>C2</sub> o f = f = f o 1<sub>C1</sub>
51 </pre>
52
53 These parallel the constraints for monoids. Note that there can be multiple distinct morphisms between an element `E` and itself; they need not all be identity morphisms. Indeed from (iii) it follows that each element can have only a single identity morphism.
54
55 A good intuitive picture of a category is as a generalized directed graph, where the category elements are the graph's nodes, and there can be multiple directed edges between a given pair of nodes, and nodes can also have multiple directed edges to themselves. (Every node must have at least one such, which is that node's identity morphism.)
56
57
58 Some examples of categories are:
59
60 *       Categories whose elements are sets and whose morphisms are functions between those sets. Here the source and target of a function are its domain and range, so distinct functions sharing a domain and range (e.g., sin and cos) are distinct morphisms between the same source and target elements. The identity morphism for any element/set is just the identity function for that set.
61
62 *       any monoid `(S,*,z)` generates a category with a single element `x`; this `x` need not have any relation to `S`. The members of `S` play the role of *morphisms* of this category, rather than its elements. All of these morphisms are understood to map `x` to itself. The result of composing the morphism consisting of `s1` with the morphism `s2` is the morphism `s3`, where `s3=s1*s2`. The identity morphism for the (single) category element `x` is the monoid's identity `z`.
63
64 *       a **preorder** is a structure `(S, <=)` consisting of a reflexive, transitive, binary relation on a set `S`. It need not be connected (that is, there may be members `x`,`y` of `S` such that neither `x<=y` nor `y<=x`). It need not be anti-symmetric (that is, there may be members `s1`,`s2` of `S` such that `s1<=s2` and `s2<=s1` but `s1` and `s2` are not identical). Some examples:
65
66         *       sentences ordered by logical implication ("p and p" implies and is implied by "p", but these sentences are not identical; so this illustrates a pre-order without anti-symmetry)
67         *       sets ordered by size (this illustrates it too)
68
69         Any pre-order `(S,<=)` generates a category whose elements are the members of `S` and which has only a single morphism between any two elements `s1` and `s2`, iff `s1<=s2`.
70
71
72 Functors
73 --------
74 A **functor** is a "homomorphism", that is, a structure-preserving mapping, between categories. In particular, a functor `F` from category <b>C</b> to category <b>D</b> must:
75
76 <pre>
77         (i) associate with every element C1 of <b>C</b> an element F(C1) of <b>D</b>
78         (ii) associate with every morphism f:C1->C2 of <b>C</b> a morphism F(f):F(C1)->F(C2) of <b>D</b>
79         (iii) "preserve identity", that is, for every element C1 of <b>C</b>: F of C1's identity morphism in <b>C</b> must be the identity morphism of F(C1) in <b>D</b>: F(1<sub>C1</sub>) = 1<sub>F(C1)</sub>.
80         (iv) "distribute over composition", that is for any morphisms f and g in <b>C</b>: F(g o f) = F(g) o F(f)
81 </pre>
82
83 A functor that maps a category to itself is called an **endofunctor**. The (endo)functor that maps every element and morphism of <b>C</b> to itself is denoted `1C`.
84
85 How functors compose: If `G` is a functor from category <b>C</b> to category <b>D</b>, and `K` is a functor from category <b>D</b> to category <b>E</b>, then `KG` is a functor which maps every element `C1` of <b>C</b> to element `K(G(C1))` of <b>E</b>, and maps every morphism `f` of <b>C</b> to morphism `K(G(f))` of <b>E</b>.
86
87 I'll assert without proving that functor composition is associative.
88
89
90
91 Natural Transformation
92 ----------------------
93 So categories include elements and morphisms. Functors consist of mappings from the elements and morphisms of one category to those of another (or the same) category. **Natural transformations** are a third level of mappings, from one functor to another.
94
95 Where `G` and `H` are functors from category <b>C</b> to category <b>D</b>, a natural transformation &eta; between `G` and `H` is a family of morphisms &eta;[C1]:G(C1)->H(C1)` in <b>D</b> for each element `C1` of <b>C</b>. That is, &eta;[C1]` has as source `C1`'s image under `G` in <b>D</b>, and as target `C1`'s image under `H` in <b>D</b>. The morphisms in this family must also satisfy the constraint:
96
97         for every morphism f:C1->C2 in <b>C</b>: &eta;[C2] o G(f) = H(f) o &eta;[C1]
98
99 That is, the morphism via `G(f)` from `G(C1)` to `G(C2)`, and then via &eta;[C2]` to `H(C2)`, is identical to the morphism from `G(C1)` via &eta;[C1]` to `H(C1)`, and then via `H(f)` from `H(C1)` to `H(C2)`.
100
101
102 How natural transformations compose:
103
104 Consider four categories <b>B</b>, <b>C</b>, <b>D</b>, and <b>E</b>. Let `F` be a functor from <b>B</b> to <b>C</b>; `G`, `H`, and `J` be functors from <b>C</b> to <b>D</b>; and `K` and `L` be functors from <b>D</b> to <b>E</b>. Let &eta; be a natural transformation from `G` to `H`; &phi; be a natural transformation from `H` to `J`; and &psi; be a natural transformation from `K` to `L`. Pictorally:
105
106         - <b>B</b> -+ +--- <b>C</b> --+ +---- <b>D</b> -----+ +-- <b>E</b> --
107                  | |        | |            | |
108          F: ------> G: ------>     K: ------>
109                  | |        | |  | &eta;     | |  | &psi;
110                  | |        | |  v         | |  v
111                  | |    H: ------>     L: ------>
112                  | |        | |  | &phi;     | |
113                  | |        | |  v         | |
114                  | |    J: ------>         | |
115         -----+ +--------+ +------------+ +-------
116
117 Then `(&eta; F)` is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor `GF` to the composite functor `HF`, such that where `b1` is an element of category <b>B</b>, `(&eta; F)[b1] = &eta;[F(b1)]`---that is, the morphism in <b>D</b> that &eta; assigns to the element `F(b1)` of <b>C</b>.
118
119 And `(K &eta;)` is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor `KG` to the (composite) functor `KH`, such that where `C1` is an element of category <b>C</b>, `(K &eta;)[C1] = K(&eta;[C1])`---that is, the morphism in <b>E</b> that `K` assigns to the morphism &eta;[C1]` of <b>D</b>.
120
121
122 `(&phi; -v- &eta;)` is a natural transformation from `G` to `J`; this is known as a "vertical composition". We will rely later on this, where `f:C1->C2`:
123
124         &phi;[C2] o H(f) o &eta;[C1] = &phi;[C2] o H(f) o &eta;[C1]
125
126 by naturalness of &phi;, is:
127
128         &phi;[C2] o H(f) o &eta;[C1] = J(f) o &phi;[C1] o &eta;[C1]
129
130 by naturalness of &eta;, is:
131
132         &phi;[C2] o &eta;[C2] o G(f) = J(f) o &phi;[C1] o &eta;[C1]
133
134 Hence, we can define `(&phi; -v- &eta;)[x]` as: &phi;[x] o &eta;[x]` and rely on it to satisfy the constraints for a natural transformation from `G` to `J`:
135
136         (&phi; -v- &eta;)[C2] o G(f) = J(f) o (&phi; -v- &eta;)[C1]
137
138 An observation we'll rely on later: given the definitions of vertical composition and of how natural transformations compose with functors, it follows that:
139
140         ((&phi; -v- &eta;) F) = ((&phi; F) -v- (&eta; F))
141
142 I'll assert without proving that vertical composition is associative and has an identity, which we'll call "the identity transformation."
143
144
145 `(&psi; -h- &eta;)` is natural transformation from the (composite) functor `KG` to the (composite) functor `LH`; this is known as a "horizontal composition." It's trickier to define, but we won't be using it here. For reference:
146
147         (&phi; -h- &eta;)[C1]  =  L(&eta;[C1]) o &psi;[G(C1)]
148                                            =  &psi;[H(C1)] o K(&eta;[C1])
149
150 Horizontal composition is also associative, and has the same identity as vertical composition.
151
152
153
154 Monads
155 ------
156 In earlier days, these were also called "triples."
157
158 A **monad** is a structure consisting of an (endo)functor `M` from some category <b>C</b> to itself, along with some natural transformations, which we'll specify in a moment.
159
160 Let `T` be a set of natural transformations `p`, each being between some (variable) functor `P` and another functor which is the composite `MP'` of `M` and a (variable) functor `P'`. That is, for each element `C1` in <b>C</b>, `p` assigns `C1` a morphism from element `P(C1)` to element `MP'(C1)`, satisfying the constraints detailed in the previous section. For different members of `T`, the relevant functors may differ; that is, `p` is a transformation from functor `P` to `MP'`, `q` is a transformation from functor `Q` to `MQ'`, and none of `P`, `P'`, `Q`, `Q'` need be the same.
161
162 One of the members of `T` will be designated the "unit" transformation for `M`, and it will be a transformation from the identity functor `1C` for <b>C</b> to `M(1C)`. So it will assign to `C1` a morphism from `C1` to `M(C1)`.
163
164 We also need to designate for `M` a "join" transformation, which is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor `MM` to `M`.
165
166 These two natural transformations have to satisfy some constraints ("the monad laws") which are most easily stated if we can introduce a defined notion.
167
168 Let `p` and `q` be members of `T`, that is they are natural transformations from `P` to `MP'` and from `Q` to `MQ'`, respectively. Let them be such that `P' = Q`. Now `(M q)` will also be a natural transformation, formed by composing the functor `M` with the natural transformation `q`. Similarly, `(join Q')` will be a natural transformation, formed by composing the natural transformation `join` with the functor `Q'`; it will transform the functor `MMQ'` to the functor `MQ'`. Now take the vertical composition of the three natural transformations `(join Q')`, `(M q)`, and `p`, and abbreviate it as follows:
169
170         q <=< p  =def.  ((join Q') -v- (M q) -v- p)
171
172 Since composition is associative I don't specify the order of composition on the rhs.
173
174 In other words, `<=<` is a binary operator that takes us from two members `p` and `q` of `T` to a composite natural transformation. (In functional programming, at least, this is called the "Kleisli composition operator". Sometimes its written `p >=> q` where that's the same as `q <=< p`.)
175
176 `p` is a transformation from `P` to `MP'` which = `MQ`; `(M q)` is a transformation from `MQ` to `MMQ'`; and `(join Q')` is a transformation from `MMQ'` to `MQ'`. So the composite `q <=< p` will be a transformation from `P` to `MQ'`, and so also eligible to be a member of `T`.
177
178 Now we can specify the "monad laws" governing a monad as follows:
179
180         (T, <=<, unit) constitute a monoid
181
182 That's it. (Well, perhaps we're cheating a bit, because `q <=< p` isn't fully defined on `T`, but only when `P` is a functor to `MP'` and `Q` is a functor from `P'`. But wherever `<=<` is defined, the monoid laws are satisfied:
183
184         (i) q <=< p is also in T
185         (ii) (r <=< q) <=< p  =  r <=< (q <=< p)
186         (iii.1) unit <=< p  =  p                 (here p has to be a natural transformation to M(1C))
187         (iii.2)                p  =  p <=< unit  (here p has to be a natural transformation from 1C)
188
189 If `p` is a natural transformation from `P` to `M(1C)` and `q` is `(p Q')`, that is, a natural transformation from `PQ` to `MQ`, then we can extend (iii.1) as follows:
190
191         q = (p Q')
192           = ((unit <=< p) Q')
193           = ((join -v- (M unit) -v- p) Q')
194           = (join Q') -v- ((M unit) Q') -v- (p Q')
195           = (join Q') -v- (M (unit Q')) -v- q
196           ??
197           = (unit Q') <=< q
198
199 where as we said `q` is a natural transformation from some `PQ'` to `MQ'`.
200
201 Similarly, if `p` is a natural transformation from `1C` to `MP'`, and `q` is `(p Q)`, that is, a natural transformation from `Q` to `MP'Q`, then we can extend (iii.2) as follows:
202
203         q = (p Q)
204           = ((p <=< unit) Q)
205           = (((join P') -v- (M p) -v- unit) Q)
206           = ((join P'Q) -v- ((M p) Q) -v- (unit Q))
207           = ((join P'Q) -v- (M (p Q)) -v- (unit Q))
208           ??
209           = q <=< (unit Q)
210
211 where as we said `q` is a natural transformation from `Q` to some `MP'Q`.
212
213
214
215
216 The standard category-theory presentation of the monad laws
217 -----------------------------------------------------------
218 In category theory, the monad laws are usually stated in terms of `unit` and `join` instead of `unit` and `<=<`.
219
220 (*
221         P2. every element C1 of a category <b>C</b> has an identity morphism 1<sub>C1</sub> such that for every morphism f:C1->C2 in <b>C</b>: 1<sub>C2</sub> o f = f = f o 1<sub>C1</sub>.
222         P3. functors "preserve identity", that is for every element C1 in F's source category: F(1<sub>C1</sub>) = 1<sub>F(C1)</sub>.
223 *)
224
225 Let's remind ourselves of some principles:
226         * composition of morphisms, functors, and natural compositions is associative
227         * functors "distribute over composition", that is for any morphisms f and g in F's source category: F(g o f) = F(g) o F(f)
228         * if &eta; is a natural transformation from F to G, then for every f:C1->C2 in F and G's source category <b>C</b>: &eta;[C2] o F(f) = G(f) o &eta;[C1].
229
230
231 Let's use the definitions of naturalness, and of composition of natural transformations, to establish two lemmas.
232
233
234 Recall that join is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor MM to M. So for elements C1 in <b>C</b>, join[C1] will be a morphism from MM(C1) to M(C1). And for any morphism f:a->b in <b>C</b>:
235
236         (1) join[b] o MM(f)  =  M(f) o join[a]
237
238 Next, consider the composite transformation ((join MQ') -v- (MM q)).
239         q is a transformation from Q to MQ', and assigns elements C1 in <b>C</b> a morphism q*: Q(C1) -> MQ'(C1). (MM q) is a transformation that instead assigns C1 the morphism MM(q*).
240         (join MQ') is a transformation from MMMQ' to MMQ' that assigns C1 the morphism join[MQ'(C1)].
241         Composing them:
242         (2) ((join MQ') -v- (MM q)) assigns to C1 the morphism join[MQ'(C1)] o MM(q*).
243
244 Next, consider the composite transformation ((M q) -v- (join Q)).
245         (3) This assigns to C1 the morphism M(q*) o join[Q(C1)].
246
247 So for every element C1 of <b>C</b>:
248         ((join MQ') -v- (MM q))[C1], by (2) is:
249         join[MQ'(C1)] o MM(q*), which by (1), with f=q*: Q(C1)->MQ'(C1) is:
250         M(q*) o join[Q(C1)], which by 3 is:
251         ((M q) -v- (join Q))[C1]
252
253 So our (lemma 1) is: ((join MQ') -v- (MM q))  =  ((M q) -v- (join Q)), where q is a transformation from Q to MQ'.
254
255
256 Next recall that unit is a natural transformation from 1C to M. So for elements C1 in <b>C</b>, unit[C1] will be a morphism from C1 to M(C1). And for any morphism f:a->b in <b>C</b>:
257         (4) unit[b] o f = M(f) o unit[a]
258
259 Next consider the composite transformation ((M q) -v- (unit Q)). (5) This assigns to C1 the morphism M(q*) o unit[Q(C1)].
260
261 Next consider the composite transformation ((unit MQ') -v- q). (6) This assigns to C1 the morphism unit[MQ'(C1)] o q*.
262
263 So for every element C1 of <b>C</b>:
264         ((M q) -v- (unit Q))[C1], by (5) =
265         M(q*) o unit[Q(C1)], which by (4), with f=q*: Q(C1)->MQ'(C1) is:
266         unit[MQ'(C1)] o q*, which by (6) =
267         ((unit MQ') -v- q)[C1]
268
269 So our lemma (2) is: (((M q) -v- (unit Q))  =  ((unit MQ') -v- q)), where q is a transformation from Q to MQ'.
270
271
272 Finally, we substitute ((join Q') -v- (M q) -v- p) for q <=< p in the monad laws. For simplicity, I'll omit the "-v-".
273
274         for all p,q,r in T, where p is a transformation from P to MP', q is a transformation from Q to MQ', R is a transformation from R to MR', and P'=Q and Q'=R:
275
276         (i) q <=< p etc are also in T
277         ==>
278         (i') ((join Q') (M q) p) etc are also in T
279
280
281         (ii) (r <=< q) <=< p  =  r <=< (q <=< p)
282         ==>
283                  (r <=< q) is a transformation from Q to MR', so:
284                         (r <=< q) <=< p becomes: (join R') (M (r <=< q)) p
285                                                         which is: (join R') (M ((join R') (M r) q)) p
286                         substituting in (ii), and helping ourselves to associativity on the rhs, we get:
287
288              ((join R') (M ((join R') (M r) q)) p) = ((join R') (M r) (join Q') (M q) p)
289                      ---------------------
290                         which by the distributivity of functors over composition, and helping ourselves to associativity on the lhs, yields:
291                     ------------------------
292              ((join R') (M join R') (MM r) (M q) p) = ((join R') (M r) (join Q') (M q) p)
293                                                              ---------------
294                         which by lemma 1, with r a transformation from Q' to MR', yields:
295                                                              -----------------
296              ((join R') (M join R') (MM r) (M q) p) = ((join R') (join MR') (MM r) (M q) p)
297
298                         which will be true for all r,q,p just in case:
299
300               ((join R') (M join R')) = ((join R') (join MR')), for any R'.
301
302                         which will in turn be true just in case:
303
304         (ii') (join (M join)) = (join (join M))
305
306
307         (iii.1) (unit P') <=< p  =  p
308         ==>
309                         (unit P') is a transformation from P' to MP', so:
310                                 (unit P') <=< p becomes: (join P') (M unit P') p
311                                                    which is: (join P') (M unit P') p
312                                 substituting in (iii.1), we get:
313                         ((join P') (M unit P') p) = p
314
315                         which will be true for all p just in case:
316
317                  ((join P') (M unit P')) = the identity transformation, for any P'
318
319                         which will in turn be true just in case:
320
321         (iii.1') (join (M unit) = the identity transformation
322
323
324         (iii.2) p  =  p <=< (unit P)
325         ==>
326                         p is a transformation from P to MP', so:
327                                 unit <=< p becomes: (join P') (M p) unit
328                                 substituting in (iii.2), we get:
329                         p = ((join P') (M p) (unit P))
330                                                    --------------
331                                 which by lemma (2), yields:
332                             ------------
333                         p = ((join P') ((unit MP') p)
334
335                                 which will be true for all p just in case:
336
337                 ((join P') (unit MP')) = the identity transformation, for any P'
338
339                                 which will in turn be true just in case:
340
341         (iii.2') (join (unit M)) = the identity transformation
342
343
344 Collecting the results, our monad laws turn out in this format to be:
345
346         when p a transformation from P to MP', q a transformation from P' to MQ', r a transformation from Q' to MR' all in T:
347
348         (i') ((join Q') (M q) p) etc also in T
349
350         (ii') (join (M join)) = (join (join M))
351
352         (iii.1') (join (M unit)) = the identity transformation
353
354         (iii.2')(join (unit M)) = the identity transformation
355
356
357
358 7. The functional programming presentation of the monad laws
359 ------------------------------------------------------------
360 In functional programming, unit is usually called "return" and the monad laws are usually stated in terms of return and an operation called "bind" which is interdefinable with <=< or with join.
361
362 Additionally, whereas in category-theory one works "monomorphically", in functional programming one usually works with "polymorphic" functions.
363
364 The base category <b>C</b> will have types as elements, and monadic functions as its morphisms. The source and target of a morphism will be the types of its argument and its result. (As always, there can be multiple distinct morphisms from the same source to the same target.)
365
366 A monad M will consist of a mapping from types C1 to types M(C1), and a mapping from functions f:C1->C2 to functions M(f):M(C1)->M(C2). This is also known as "fmap f" or "liftM f" for M, and is called "function f lifted into the monad M." For example, where M is the list monad, M maps every type X into the type "list of Xs", and maps every function f:x->y into the function that maps [x1,x2...] to [y1,y2,...].
367
368
369
370
371 A natural transformation t assigns to each type C1 in <b>C</b> a morphism t[C1]: C1->M(C1) such that, for every f:C1->C2:
372         t[C2] o f = M(f) o t[C1]
373
374 The composite morphisms said here to be identical are morphisms from the type C1 to the type M(C2).
375
376
377
378 In functional programming, instead of working with natural transformations we work with "monadic values" and polymorphic functions "into the monad" in question.
379
380 For an example of the latter, let p be a function that takes arguments of some (schematic, polymorphic) type C1 and yields results of some (schematic, polymorphic) type M(C2). An example with M being the list monad, and C2 being the tuple type schema int * C1:
381
382         let p = fun c -> [(1,c), (2,c)]
383
384 p is polymorphic: when you apply it to the int 0 you get a result of type "list of int * int": [(1,0), (2,0)]. When you apply it to the char 'e' you get a result of type "list of int * char": [(1,'e'), (2,'e')].
385
386 However, to keep things simple, we'll work instead with functions whose type is settled. So instead of the polymorphic p, we'll work with (p : C1 -> M(int * C1)). This only accepts arguments of type C1. For generality, I'll talk of functions with the type (p : C1 -> M(C1')), where we assume that C1' is a function of C1.
387
388 A "monadic value" is any member of a type M(C1), for any type C1. For example, a list is a monadic value for the list monad. We can think of these monadic values as the result of applying some function (p : C1 -> M(C1')) to an argument of type C1.
389
390