(no commit message)
authorbarker <barker@web>
Tue, 21 Sep 2010 00:40:35 +0000 (20:40 -0400)
committerLambda Wiki <lambda@SERVER.PHILOSOPHY.FAS.NYU.EDU>
Tue, 21 Sep 2010 00:40:35 +0000 (20:40 -0400)
lambda_evaluator.mdwn

index df28a42..16eace7 100644 (file)
@@ -6,13 +6,16 @@ It will allow you to write lambda terms and evaluate them, with full ability to
 (This won't work in Racket, because Racket doesn't even try to represent the internal structure of a function in a human-readable way.)  
 
 *Lambda terms*: lambda terms are written with a backslash, thus: `((\x (\y x)) z)`.  
 (This won't work in Racket, because Racket doesn't even try to represent the internal structure of a function in a human-readable way.)  
 
 *Lambda terms*: lambda terms are written with a backslash, thus: `((\x (\y x)) z)`.  
-If you click "Reduce", the system will produce a lambda term that is guaranteed to be reduction equivalent (`<~~>`) with the original term.  So `((\x (\y x)) z)` reduces to `(\y z)`.
+If you click "Reduce", the system will produce a lambda term that is guaranteed to be reduction equivalent (`<~~>`) with the original term.  So `((\x (\y x)) z)` reduces to (a lambda term equivalent to) `(\y z)`.
 
 *Let*: in order to make building a more elaborate system easier, it is possible to define values using `let`.
 In this toy system, `let`s should only be used at the beginning of a file.  If we have, for intance,
 
     let true = (\x (\y x)) in
     let false = (\x (\y y)) in
 
 *Let*: in order to make building a more elaborate system easier, it is possible to define values using `let`.
 In this toy system, `let`s should only be used at the beginning of a file.  If we have, for intance,
 
     let true = (\x (\y x)) in
     let false = (\x (\y y)) in
+    ((true true) false)
+
+the result is `true`.
 
 *Comments*:
 
 
 *Comments*: