add anchors
authorjim <jim@web>
Thu, 12 Feb 2015 18:07:49 +0000 (13:07 -0500)
committerLinux User <ikiwiki@localhost.members.linode.com>
Thu, 12 Feb 2015 18:07:49 +0000 (13:07 -0500)
topics/week3_lists.mdwn

index 6f7c1e0..08b3516 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,6 @@
 # More on Lists #
 
 # More on Lists #
 
+<a id=comprehensions></a>
 ## Comprehensions ##
 
 We know you are already familiar with the following kind of notation for designating sets:
 ## Comprehensions ##
 
 We know you are already familiar with the following kind of notation for designating sets:
@@ -119,6 +120,8 @@ not to:
 To get the latter, you'd need to apply `join` twice.
 
 
 To get the latter, you'd need to apply `join` twice.
 
 
+
+<a id=tails></a>
 ## Tails ##
 
 For the Lambda Calculus, we've proposed to encode lists in terms of higher-order functions that perform right-folds on (what we intuitively regard as) the real list. Thus, the list we'd write in Kapulet or Haskell as:
 ## Tails ##
 
 For the Lambda Calculus, we've proposed to encode lists in terms of higher-order functions that perform right-folds on (what we intuitively regard as) the real list. Thus, the list we'd write in Kapulet or Haskell as:
@@ -151,3 +154,5 @@ Try it out in the lambda evaluator. After the code above, you can write:
 
 and the result will be `\f z. f b (f c z)`, our encoding of `[b, c]`.
 
 
 and the result will be `\f z. f b (f c z)`, our encoding of `[b, c]`.
 
+
+<a id=v2-lists></a>