update week1 notes
authorJim <jim.pryor@nyu.edu>
Sun, 1 Feb 2015 10:41:37 +0000 (05:41 -0500)
committerJim <jim.pryor@nyu.edu>
Sun, 1 Feb 2015 10:41:37 +0000 (05:41 -0500)
week1_advanced_notes.mdwn

index 887e048..2cf6e3a 100644 (file)
@@ -161,7 +161,7 @@ is parsed as:
 
 ### Some common functions ###
 
 
 ### Some common functions ###
 
-Function composition, which mathematicians write as `f` &circ; `g`, is defined as &lambda; `x. f (g x)`. This notion is one you'll commonly be encountering in functional programming, so it's handy to have a short and clear notation for it. Haskell expresses this relation using a period, like this: `f . g`. But we are using the period for other purposes, as in our &lambda-constructions; and even Haskell gets into some awkwardness because they use it in other ways too. Perhaps we could use a simple `o` as an infix composition operator? I'm not sure if that would be clear enough. For the time being, I'm electing to write this notion as `comp`, but as an infix expression, so we write: `f comp g` to mean &lambda; `x. f (g x)`. We may revisit this notational proposal later.
+Function composition, which mathematicians write as `f` &cir; `g`, is defined as &lambda; `x. f (g x)`. This notion is one you'll commonly be encountering in functional programming, so it's handy to have a short and clear notation for it. Haskell expresses this relation using a period, like this: `f . g`. But we are using the period for other purposes, as in our &lambda-constructions; and even Haskell gets into some awkwardness because they use it in other ways too. Perhaps we could use a simple `o` as an infix composition operator? I'm not sure if that would be clear enough. For the time being, I'm electing to write this notion as `comp`, but as an infix expression, so we write: `f comp g` to mean &lambda; `x. f (g x)`. We may revisit this notational proposal later.
 
 We've already come across the `id` function, namely &lambda; `x. x`.
 
 
 We've already come across the `id` function, namely &lambda; `x. x`.