adjusted talk about *and*
[lambda.git] / rosetta1.mdwn
index eda1a9f..70866b1 100644 (file)
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
 
 ## Can you summarize the differences between your made-up language and Scheme, OCaml, and Haskell? ##
 
 
 ## Can you summarize the differences between your made-up language and Scheme, OCaml, and Haskell? ##
 
-The made-up language we wet our toes in in week 1 is called Kapulet. (I'll tell you [the story behind its name](/randj.jpg) sometime.) The purpose of starting with this language is that it represents something of a center of gravity between Scheme, OCaml, and Haskell, and also lacks many of their idiosyncratic warts. One downside is that it's not yet implemented in a form that you can run on your computers. So for now, if you want to try out your code on a real mechanical evaluator, you'll need to use one of the other languages.
+The made-up language we wet our toes in in week 1 is called Kapulet. (I'll tell you [the story behind its name](/images/randj.jpg) sometime.) The purpose of starting with this language is that it represents something of a center of gravity between Scheme, OCaml, and Haskell, and also lacks many of their idiosyncratic warts. One downside is that it's not yet implemented in a form that you can run on your computers. So for now, if you want to try out your code on a real mechanical evaluator, you'll need to use one of the other languages.
 
 Also, if you want to read code written outside this seminar, or have others read your code, for these reasons too you'll need to make the shift over to one of the established languages.
 
 
 Also, if you want to read code written outside this seminar, or have others read your code, for these reasons too you'll need to make the shift over to one of the established languages.
 
@@ -215,7 +215,7 @@ Fourth, in Kapulet, `( - 10)` expresses λ `x. x - 10` (consistently with
     ( - 2)         # ( - 2) 10 == 8
     (0 - )
     ( - ) (5, 3)
     ( - 2)         # ( - 2) 10 == 8
     (0 - )
     ( - ) (5, 3)
-    
+
 
 and here are their translations into natural Haskell:
 
 
 and here are their translations into natural Haskell:
 
@@ -779,7 +779,7 @@ Notice that this form ends with `end`, not with `in result`. The above is roughl
       pat1  match expr1;
       ...
     in ... # rest of program or library
       pat1  match expr1;
       ...
     in ... # rest of program or library
-    
+
 That is, the bindings initiated by the clauses of the `let` construction remain in effect until the end of the program or library. They can of course be "hidden" by subsequent bindings to new variables spelled the same way. The program:
 
     # Kapulet
 That is, the bindings initiated by the clauses of the `let` construction remain in effect until the end of the program or library. They can of course be "hidden" by subsequent bindings to new variables spelled the same way. The program:
 
     # Kapulet