add set_equal?
[lambda.git] / exercises / assignment5.mdwn
index f4955d9..a74da85 100644 (file)
@@ -116,7 +116,7 @@ Choose one of these languages and write the following functions.
 
 6.  How would you use the function defined in problem 4 to enumerate a tree's fringe? (Don't worry about whether it comes out left-to-right or right-to-left.)
 
-7.  Write a recursive function to make a copy of a `color_tree` with the same structure and inner branch colors, but where the leftmost leaf is now labeled `0`, the second-leftmost leaf is now labeled `1`, and so on. (Here's a [[hint|assignment5 hint4]], if you need one.)
+7.  Write a recursive function to make a copy of a `color_tree` with the same structure and inner branch colors, but where the leftmost leaf is now labeled `0`, the second-leftmost leaf is now labeled `1`, and so on. (Here's a [[hint|assignment5 hint3]], if you need one.)
 
 8.  (More challenging.) Write a recursive function that makes a copy of a `color_tree` with the same structure and inner branch colors, but replaces each leaf label with the `int` that reports how many of that leaf's ancestors are labeled `Red`. For example, if we give your function a tree:
 
@@ -329,7 +329,7 @@ any type `α`, as long as your function is of type `α -> α` and you have a bas
         -- Or this:
         let sysf_true = (\y n -> y) :: Sysf_bool a
 
-    Note that in both OCaml and the Haskell code, the generalization `∀'a` on the free type variable `'a` is implicit. If you really want to, you can supply it explicitly in Haskell by saying:
+    Note that in both OCaml and Haskell code, the generalization `∀α` on the free type variable `α` is implicit. If you really want to, you can supply it explicitly in Haskell by saying:
 
         :set -XExplicitForAll
         let { sysf_true :: forall a. Sysf_bool a; ... }
@@ -408,7 +408,7 @@ Be sure to test your proposals with simple lists. (You'll have to `sysf_cons` up
         # k 1 true ;;
         - : int = 1
 
-    If you can't understand how one term can have several types, recall our discussion in this week's notes of "principal types". (WHERE?)
+    If you can't understand how one term can have several types, recall our discussion in this week's notes of "principal types".