cat theory: different bold
[lambda.git] / advanced_topics / monads_in_category_theory.mdwn
index aef5538..0f84bb2 100644 (file)
@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@ Categories
 ----------
 A **category** is a generalization of a monoid. A category consists of a class of **elements**, and a class of **morphisms** between those elements. Morphisms are sometimes also called maps or arrows. They are something like functions (and as we'll see below, given a set of functions they'll determine a category). However, a single morphism only maps between a single source element and a single target element. Also, there can be multiple distinct morphisms between the same source and target, so the identity of a morphism goes beyond its "extension."
 
-When a morphism `f` in category **C** has source `C1` and target `C2`, we'll write `f:C1->C2`.
+When a morphism `f` in category <b>C</b> has source `C1` and target `C2`, we'll write `f:C1->C2`.
 
 To have a category, the elements and morphisms have to satisfy some constraints:
 
@@ -71,18 +71,18 @@ Some examples of categories are:
 
 Functors
 --------
-A **functor** is a "homomorphism", that is, a structure-preserving mapping, between categories. In particular, a functor `F` from category **C** to category **D** must:
+A **functor** is a "homomorphism", that is, a structure-preserving mapping, between categories. In particular, a functor `F` from category <b>C</b> to category <b>D</b> must:
 
 <pre>
-       (i) associate with every element C1 of **C** an element F(C1) of **D**
-       (ii) associate with every morphism f:C1->C2 of **C** a morphism F(f):F(C1)->F(C2) of **D**
-       (iii) "preserve identity", that is, for every element C1 of **C**: F of C1's identity morphism in **C** must be the identity morphism of F(C1) in **D**: F(1<sub>C1</sub>) = 1<sub>F(C1)</sub>.
-       (iv) "distribute over composition", that is for any morphisms f and g in **C**: F(g o f) = F(g) o F(f)
+       (i) associate with every element C1 of <b>C</b> an element F(C1) of <b>D</b>
+       (ii) associate with every morphism f:C1->C2 of <b>C</b> a morphism F(f):F(C1)->F(C2) of <b>D</b>
+       (iii) "preserve identity", that is, for every element C1 of <b>C</b>: F of C1's identity morphism in <b>C</b> must be the identity morphism of F(C1) in <b>D</b>: F(1<sub>C1</sub>) = 1<sub>F(C1)</sub>.
+       (iv) "distribute over composition", that is for any morphisms f and g in <b>C</b>: F(g o f) = F(g) o F(f)
 </pre>
 
-A functor that maps a category to itself is called an **endofunctor**. The (endo)functor that maps every element and morphism of **C** to itself is denoted `1C`.
+A functor that maps a category to itself is called an **endofunctor**. The (endo)functor that maps every element and morphism of <b>C</b> to itself is denoted `1C`.
 
-How functors compose: If `G` is a functor from category **C** to category **D**, and `K` is a functor from category **D** to category **E**, then `KG` is a functor which maps every element `C1` of **C** to element `K(G(C1))` of **E**, and maps every morphism `f` of **C** to morphism `K(G(f))` of **E**.
+How functors compose: If `G` is a functor from category <b>C</b> to category <b>D</b>, and `K` is a functor from category <b>D</b> to category <b>E</b>, then `KG` is a functor which maps every element `C1` of <b>C</b> to element `K(G(C1))` of <b>E</b>, and maps every morphism `f` of <b>C</b> to morphism `K(G(f))` of <b>E</b>.
 
 I'll assert without proving that functor composition is associative.
 
@@ -92,18 +92,18 @@ Natural Transformation
 ----------------------
 So categories include elements and morphisms. Functors consist of mappings from the elements and morphisms of one category to those of another (or the same) category. **Natural transformations** are a third level of mappings, from one functor to another.
 
-Where `G` and `H` are functors from category **C** to category **D**, a natural transformation &eta; between `G` and `H` is a family of morphisms &eta;[C1]:G(C1)->H(C1)` in **D** for each element `C1` of **C**. That is, &eta;[C1]` has as source `C1`'s image under `G` in **D**, and as target `C1`'s image under `H` in **D**. The morphisms in this family must also satisfy the constraint:
+Where `G` and `H` are functors from category <b>C</b> to category <b>D</b>, a natural transformation &eta; between `G` and `H` is a family of morphisms &eta;[C1]:G(C1)->H(C1)` in <b>D</b> for each element `C1` of <b>C</b>. That is, &eta;[C1]` has as source `C1`'s image under `G` in <b>D</b>, and as target `C1`'s image under `H` in <b>D</b>. The morphisms in this family must also satisfy the constraint:
 
-       for every morphism f:C1->C2 in **C**: &eta;[C2] o G(f) = H(f) o &eta;[C1]
+       for every morphism f:C1->C2 in <b>C</b>: &eta;[C2] o G(f) = H(f) o &eta;[C1]
 
 That is, the morphism via `G(f)` from `G(C1)` to `G(C2)`, and then via &eta;[C2]` to `H(C2)`, is identical to the morphism from `G(C1)` via &eta;[C1]` to `H(C1)`, and then via `H(f)` from `H(C1)` to `H(C2)`.
 
 
 How natural transformations compose:
 
-Consider four categories **B**, **C**, **D**, and **E**. Let `F` be a functor from **B** to **C**; `G`, `H`, and `J` be functors from **C** to **D**; and `K` and `L` be functors from **D** to **E**. Let &eta; be a natural transformation from `G` to `H`; &phi; be a natural transformation from `H` to `J`; and &psi; be a natural transformation from `K` to `L`. Pictorally:
+Consider four categories <b>B</b>, <b>C</b>, <b>D</b>, and <b>E</b>. Let `F` be a functor from <b>B</b> to <b>C</b>; `G`, `H`, and `J` be functors from <b>C</b> to <b>D</b>; and `K` and `L` be functors from <b>D</b> to <b>E</b>. Let &eta; be a natural transformation from `G` to `H`; &phi; be a natural transformation from `H` to `J`; and &psi; be a natural transformation from `K` to `L`. Pictorally:
 
-       - **B** -+ +--- **C** --+ +---- **D** -----+ +-- **E** --
+       - <b>B</b> -+ +--- <b>C</b> --+ +---- <b>D</b> -----+ +-- <b>E</b> --
                 | |        | |            | |
         F: ------> G: ------>     K: ------>
                 | |        | |  | &eta;     | |  | &psi;
@@ -114,9 +114,9 @@ Consider four categories **B**, **C**, **D**, and **E**. Let `F` be a functor fr
                 | |    J: ------>         | |
        -----+ +--------+ +------------+ +-------
 
-Then `(&eta; F)` is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor `GF` to the composite functor `HF`, such that where `b1` is an element of category **B**, `(&eta; F)[b1] = &eta;[F(b1)]`---that is, the morphism in **D** that &eta; assigns to the element `F(b1)` of **C**.
+Then `(&eta; F)` is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor `GF` to the composite functor `HF`, such that where `b1` is an element of category <b>B</b>, `(&eta; F)[b1] = &eta;[F(b1)]`---that is, the morphism in <b>D</b> that &eta; assigns to the element `F(b1)` of <b>C</b>.
 
-And `(K &eta;)` is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor `KG` to the (composite) functor `KH`, such that where `C1` is an element of category **C**, `(K &eta;)[C1] = K(&eta;[C1])`---that is, the morphism in **E** that `K` assigns to the morphism &eta;[C1]` of **D**.
+And `(K &eta;)` is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor `KG` to the (composite) functor `KH`, such that where `C1` is an element of category <b>C</b>, `(K &eta;)[C1] = K(&eta;[C1])`---that is, the morphism in <b>E</b> that `K` assigns to the morphism &eta;[C1]` of <b>D</b>.
 
 
 `(&phi; -v- &eta;)` is a natural transformation from `G` to `J`; this is known as a "vertical composition". We will rely later on this, where `f:C1->C2`:
@@ -155,11 +155,11 @@ Monads
 ------
 In earlier days, these were also called "triples."
 
-A **monad** is a structure consisting of an (endo)functor `M` from some category **C** to itself, along with some natural transformations, which we'll specify in a moment.
+A **monad** is a structure consisting of an (endo)functor `M` from some category <b>C</b> to itself, along with some natural transformations, which we'll specify in a moment.
 
-Let `T` be a set of natural transformations `p`, each being between some (variable) functor `P` and another functor which is the composite `MP'` of `M` and a (variable) functor `P'`. That is, for each element `C1` in **C**, `p` assigns `C1` a morphism from element `P(C1)` to element `MP'(C1)`, satisfying the constraints detailed in the previous section. For different members of `T`, the relevant functors may differ; that is, `p` is a transformation from functor `P` to `MP'`, `q` is a transformation from functor `Q` to `MQ'`, and none of `P`, `P'`, `Q`, `Q'` need be the same.
+Let `T` be a set of natural transformations `p`, each being between some (variable) functor `P` and another functor which is the composite `MP'` of `M` and a (variable) functor `P'`. That is, for each element `C1` in <b>C</b>, `p` assigns `C1` a morphism from element `P(C1)` to element `MP'(C1)`, satisfying the constraints detailed in the previous section. For different members of `T`, the relevant functors may differ; that is, `p` is a transformation from functor `P` to `MP'`, `q` is a transformation from functor `Q` to `MQ'`, and none of `P`, `P'`, `Q`, `Q'` need be the same.
 
-One of the members of `T` will be designated the "unit" transformation for `M`, and it will be a transformation from the identity functor `1C` for **C** to `M(1C)`. So it will assign to `C1` a morphism from `C1` to `M(C1)`.
+One of the members of `T` will be designated the "unit" transformation for `M`, and it will be a transformation from the identity functor `1C` for <b>C</b> to `M(1C)`. So it will assign to `C1` a morphism from `C1` to `M(C1)`.
 
 We also need to designate for `M` a "join" transformation, which is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor `MM` to `M`.
 
@@ -218,25 +218,25 @@ The standard category-theory presentation of the monad laws
 In category theory, the monad laws are usually stated in terms of `unit` and `join` instead of `unit` and `<=<`.
 
 (*
-       P2. every element C1 of a category **C** has an identity morphism 1<sub>C1</sub> such that for every morphism f:C1->C2 in **C**: 1<sub>C2</sub> o f = f = f o 1<sub>C1</sub>.
+       P2. every element C1 of a category <b>C</b> has an identity morphism 1<sub>C1</sub> such that for every morphism f:C1->C2 in <b>C</b>: 1<sub>C2</sub> o f = f = f o 1<sub>C1</sub>.
        P3. functors "preserve identity", that is for every element C1 in F's source category: F(1<sub>C1</sub>) = 1<sub>F(C1)</sub>.
 *)
 
 Let's remind ourselves of some principles:
        * composition of morphisms, functors, and natural compositions is associative
        * functors "distribute over composition", that is for any morphisms f and g in F's source category: F(g o f) = F(g) o F(f)
-       * if &eta; is a natural transformation from F to G, then for every f:C1->C2 in F and G's source category **C**: &eta;[C2] o F(f) = G(f) o &eta;[C1].
+       * if &eta; is a natural transformation from F to G, then for every f:C1->C2 in F and G's source category <b>C</b>: &eta;[C2] o F(f) = G(f) o &eta;[C1].
 
 
 Let's use the definitions of naturalness, and of composition of natural transformations, to establish two lemmas.
 
 
-Recall that join is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor MM to M. So for elements C1 in **C**, join[C1] will be a morphism from MM(C1) to M(C1). And for any morphism f:a->b in **C**:
+Recall that join is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor MM to M. So for elements C1 in <b>C</b>, join[C1] will be a morphism from MM(C1) to M(C1). And for any morphism f:a->b in <b>C</b>:
 
        (1) join[b] o MM(f)  =  M(f) o join[a]
 
 Next, consider the composite transformation ((join MQ') -v- (MM q)).
-       q is a transformation from Q to MQ', and assigns elements C1 in **C** a morphism q*: Q(C1) -> MQ'(C1). (MM q) is a transformation that instead assigns C1 the morphism MM(q*).
+       q is a transformation from Q to MQ', and assigns elements C1 in <b>C</b> a morphism q*: Q(C1) -> MQ'(C1). (MM q) is a transformation that instead assigns C1 the morphism MM(q*).
        (join MQ') is a transformation from MMMQ' to MMQ' that assigns C1 the morphism join[MQ'(C1)].
        Composing them:
        (2) ((join MQ') -v- (MM q)) assigns to C1 the morphism join[MQ'(C1)] o MM(q*).
@@ -244,7 +244,7 @@ Next, consider the composite transformation ((join MQ') -v- (MM q)).
 Next, consider the composite transformation ((M q) -v- (join Q)).
        (3) This assigns to C1 the morphism M(q*) o join[Q(C1)].
 
-So for every element C1 of **C**:
+So for every element C1 of <b>C</b>:
        ((join MQ') -v- (MM q))[C1], by (2) is:
        join[MQ'(C1)] o MM(q*), which by (1), with f=q*: Q(C1)->MQ'(C1) is:
        M(q*) o join[Q(C1)], which by 3 is:
@@ -253,14 +253,14 @@ So for every element C1 of **C**:
 So our (lemma 1) is: ((join MQ') -v- (MM q))  =  ((M q) -v- (join Q)), where q is a transformation from Q to MQ'.
 
 
-Next recall that unit is a natural transformation from 1C to M. So for elements C1 in **C**, unit[C1] will be a morphism from C1 to M(C1). And for any morphism f:a->b in **C**:
+Next recall that unit is a natural transformation from 1C to M. So for elements C1 in <b>C</b>, unit[C1] will be a morphism from C1 to M(C1). And for any morphism f:a->b in <b>C</b>:
        (4) unit[b] o f = M(f) o unit[a]
 
 Next consider the composite transformation ((M q) -v- (unit Q)). (5) This assigns to C1 the morphism M(q*) o unit[Q(C1)].
 
 Next consider the composite transformation ((unit MQ') -v- q). (6) This assigns to C1 the morphism unit[MQ'(C1)] o q*.
 
-So for every element C1 of **C**:
+So for every element C1 of <b>C</b>:
        ((M q) -v- (unit Q))[C1], by (5) =
        M(q*) o unit[Q(C1)], which by (4), with f=q*: Q(C1)->MQ'(C1) is:
        unit[MQ'(C1)] o q*, which by (6) =
@@ -361,14 +361,14 @@ In functional programming, unit is usually called "return" and the monad laws ar
 
 Additionally, whereas in category-theory one works "monomorphically", in functional programming one usually works with "polymorphic" functions.
 
-The base category **C** will have types as elements, and monadic functions as its morphisms. The source and target of a morphism will be the types of its argument and its result. (As always, there can be multiple distinct morphisms from the same source to the same target.)
+The base category <b>C</b> will have types as elements, and monadic functions as its morphisms. The source and target of a morphism will be the types of its argument and its result. (As always, there can be multiple distinct morphisms from the same source to the same target.)
 
 A monad M will consist of a mapping from types C1 to types M(C1), and a mapping from functions f:C1->C2 to functions M(f):M(C1)->M(C2). This is also known as "fmap f" or "liftM f" for M, and is called "function f lifted into the monad M." For example, where M is the list monad, M maps every type X into the type "list of Xs", and maps every function f:x->y into the function that maps [x1,x2...] to [y1,y2,...].
 
 
 
 
-A natural transformation t assigns to each type C1 in **C** a morphism t[C1]: C1->M(C1) such that, for every f:C1->C2:
+A natural transformation t assigns to each type C1 in <b>C</b> a morphism t[C1]: C1->M(C1) such that, for every f:C1->C2:
        t[C2] o f = M(f) o t[C1]
 
 The composite morphisms said here to be identical are morphisms from the type C1 to the type M(C2).