5299e29780b16c4b94f0ee16ef4ce45d6d2d90e1
[lambda.git] / week1.mdwn
1 Here's what we did in seminar on Monday 9/13,
2
3 Sometimes these notes will expand on things mentioned only briefly in class, or discuss useful tangents that didn't even make it into class. This present page expands on *a lot*, and some of this material will be reviewed next week.
4
5 [Linguistic and Philosophical Applications of the Tools We'll be Studying](/applications)
6 ==========================================================================
7
8 [Explanation of the "Damn" example shown in class](/damn)
9
10 Basics of Lambda Calculus
11 =========================
12
13 See also:
14
15 *       [Chris Barker's Lambda Tutorial](http://homepages.nyu.edu/~cb125/Lambda)
16 *       [Lambda Animator](http://thyer.name/lambda-animator/)
17 *       MORE
18
19 The lambda calculus we'll be focusing on for the first part of the course has no types. (Some prefer to say it instead has a single type---but if you say that, you have to say that functions from this type to this type also belong to this type. Which is weird.)
20
21 Here is its syntax:
22
23 <blockquote>
24 <strong>Variables</strong>: <code>x</code>, <code>y</code>, <code>z</code>...
25 </blockquote>
26
27 Each variable is an expression. For any expressions M and N and variable a, the following are also expressions:
28
29 <blockquote>
30 <strong>Abstract</strong>: <code>(&lambda;a M)</code>
31 </blockquote>
32
33 We'll tend to write <code>(&lambda;a M)</code> as just `(\a M)`, so we don't have to write out the markup code for the <code>&lambda;</code>. You can yourself write <code>(&lambda;a M)</code> or `(\a M)` or `(lambda a M)`.
34
35 <blockquote>
36 <strong>Application</strong>: <code>(M N)</code>
37 </blockquote>
38
39 Some authors reserve the term "term" for just variables and abstracts. We'll probably just say "term" and "expression" indiscriminately for expressions of any of these three forms.
40
41 Examples of expressions:
42
43         x
44         (y x)
45         (x x)
46         (\x y)
47         (\x x)
48         (\x (\y x))
49         (x (\x x))
50         ((\x (x x)) (\x (x x)))
51
52 The lambda calculus has an associated proof theory. For now, we can regard the
53 proof theory as having just one rule, called the rule of **beta-reduction** or
54 "beta-contraction". Suppose you have some expression of the form:
55
56         ((\a M) N)
57
58 that is, an application of an abstract to some other expression. This compound form is called a **redex**, meaning it's a "beta-reducible expression." `(\a M)` is called the **head** of the redex; `N` is called the **argument**, and `M` is called the **body**.
59
60 The rule of beta-reduction permits a transition from that expression to the following:
61
62         M [a:=N]
63
64 What this means is just `M`, with any *free occurrences* inside `M` of the variable `a` replaced with the term `N`.
65
66 What is a free occurrence?
67
68 >       An occurrence of a variable `a` is **bound** in T if T has the form `(\a N)`.
69
70 >       If T has the form `(M N)`, any occurrences of `a` that are bound in `M` are also bound in T, and so too any occurrences of `a` that are bound in `N`.
71
72 >       An occurrence of a variable is **free** if it's not bound.
73
74 For instance:
75
76
77 >       T is defined to be `(x (\x (\y (x (y z)))))`
78
79 The first occurrence of `x` in T is free.  The `\x` we won't regard as containing an occurrence of `x`. The next occurrence of `x` occurs within a form that begins with `\x`, so it is bound as well. The occurrence of `y` is bound; and the occurrence of `z` is free.
80
81 To read further:
82
83 *       [[!wikipedia Free variables and bound variables]]
84
85 Here's an example of beta-reduction:
86
87         ((\x (y x)) z)
88
89 beta-reduces to:
90
91         (y z)
92
93 We'll write that like this:
94
95         ((\x (y x)) z) ~~> (y z)
96
97 Different authors use different notations. Some authors use the term "contraction" for a single reduction step, and reserve the term "reduction" for the reflexive transitive closure of that, that is, for zero or more reduction steps. Informally, it seems easiest to us to say "reduction" for one or more reduction steps. So when we write:
98
99         M ~~> N
100
101 We'll mean that you can get from M to N by one or more reduction steps. Hankin uses the symbol <code><big><big>&rarr;</big></big></code> for one-step contraction, and the symbol <code><big><big>&#8608;</big></big></code> for zero-or-more step reduction. Hindley and Seldin use <code><big><big><big>&#8883;</big></big></big><sub>1</sub></code> and <code><big><big><big>&#8883;</big></big></big></code>.
102
103 When M and N are such that there's some P that M reduces to by zero or more steps, and that N also reduces to by zero or more steps, then we say that M and N are **beta-convertible**. We'll write that like this:
104
105         M <~~> N
106
107 This is what plays the role of equality in the lambda calculus. Hankin uses the symbol `=` for this. So too do Hindley and Seldin. Personally, I keep confusing that with the relation to be described next, so let's use this notation instead. Note that `M <~~> N` doesn't mean that each of `M` and `N` are reducible to each other; that only holds when `M` and `N` are the same expression. (Or, with our convention of only saying "reducible" for one or more reduction steps, it never holds.)
108
109 In the metatheory, it's also sometimes useful to talk about formulas that are syntactically equivalent *before any reductions take place*. Hankin uses the symbol <code>&equiv;</code> for this. So too do Hindley and Seldin. We'll use that too, and will avoid using `=` when discussing the metatheory. Instead we'll use `<~~>` as we said above. When we want to introduce a stipulative definition, we'll write it out longhand, as in:
110
111 >       T is defined to be `(M N)`.
112
113 We'll regard the following two expressions:
114
115         (\x (x y))
116
117         (\z (z y))
118
119 as syntactically equivalent, since they only involve a typographic change of a bound variable. Read Hankin section 2.3 for discussion of different attitudes one can take about this.
120
121 Note that neither of those expressions are identical to:
122
123         (\x (x w))
124
125 because here it's a free variable that's been changed. Nor are they identical to:
126
127         (\y (y y))
128
129 because here the second occurrence of `y` is no longer free.
130
131 There is plenty of discussion of this, and the fine points of how substitution works, in Hankin and in various of the tutorials we've linked to about the lambda calculus. We expect you have a good intuitive understanding of what to do already, though, even if you're not able to articulate it rigorously.
132
133 *       MORE
134
135
136 Shorthand
137 ---------
138
139 The grammar we gave for the lambda calculus leads to some verbosity. There are several informal conventions in widespread use, which enable the language to be written more compactly. (If you like, you could instead articulate a formal grammar which incorporates these additional conventions. Instead of showing it to you, we'll leave it as an exercise for those so inclined.)
140
141
142 **Parentheses** Outermost parentheses around applications can be dropped. Moreover, applications will associate to the left, so `M N P` will be understood as `((M N) P)`. Finally, you can drop parentheses around abstracts, but not when they're part of an application. So you can abbreviate:
143
144         (\x (x y))
145
146 as:
147
148         \x (x y)
149
150 but you should include the parentheses in:
151
152         (\x (x y)) z
153
154 and:
155
156         z (\x (x y))
157
158
159 **Dot notation** Dot means "put a left paren here, and put the right
160 paren as far the right as possible without creating unbalanced
161 parentheses". So:
162
163         \x (\y (x y))
164
165 can be abbreviated as:
166
167         \x (\y. x y)
168
169 and that as:
170
171         \x. \y. x y
172
173 This:
174
175         \x. \y. (x y) x
176
177 abbreviates:
178
179         \x (\y ((x y) x))
180
181 This on the other hand:
182
183         (\x. \y. (x y)) x
184
185 abbreviates:
186
187         ((\x (\y (x y))) x)
188
189
190 **Merging lambdas** An expression of the form `(\x (\y M))`, or equivalently, `(\x. \y. M)`, can be abbreviated as:
191
192         (\x y. M)
193
194 Similarly, `(\x (\y (\z M)))` can be abbreviated as:
195
196         (\x y z. M)
197
198
199 Lambda terms represent functions
200 --------------------------------
201
202 The untyped lambda calculus is Turing complete: all (recursively computable) functions can be represented by lambda terms. For some lambda terms, it is easy to see what function they represent:
203
204 >       `(\x x)` represents the identity function: given any argument `M`, this function
205 simply returns `M`: `((\x x) M) ~~> M`.
206
207 >       `(\x (x x))` duplicates its argument:
208 `((\x (x x)) M) ~~> (M M)`
209
210 >       `(\x (\y x))` throws away its second argument:
211 `(((\x (\y x)) M) N) ~~> M`
212
213 and so on.
214
215 It is easy to see that distinct lambda expressions can represent the same
216 function, considered as a mapping from input to outputs. Obviously:
217
218         (\x x)
219
220 and:
221
222         (\z z)
223
224 both represent the same function, the identity function. However, we said above that we would be regarding these expressions as synactically equivalent, so they aren't yet really examples of *distinct* lambda expressions representing a single function. However, all three of these are distinct lambda expressions:
225
226         (\y x. y x) (\z z)
227
228         (\x. (\z z) x)
229
230         (\z z)
231
232 yet when applied to any argument M, all of these will always return M. So they have the same extension. It's also true, though you may not yet be in a position to see, that no other function can differentiate between them when they're supplied as an argument to it. However, these expressions are all syntactically distinct.
233
234 The first two expressions are *convertible*: in particular the first reduces to the second. So they can be regarded as proof-theoretically equivalent even though they're not syntactically identical. However, the proof theory we've given so far doesn't permit you to reduce the second expression to the third. So these lambda expressions are non-equivalent.
235
236 There's an extension of the proof-theory we've presented so far which does permit this further move. And in that extended proof theory, all computable functions with the same extension do turn out to be equivalent (convertible). However, at that point, we still won't be working with the traditional mathematical notion of a function as a set of ordered pairs. One reason is that the latter but not the former permits many uncomputable functions. A second reason is that the latter but not the former prohibits functions from applying to themselves. We discussed this some at the end of Monday's meeting (and further discussion is best pursued in person).
237
238
239
240 Booleans and pairs
241 ==================
242
243 Our definition of these is reviewed in [[Assignment1]].
244
245
246 It's possible to do the assignment without using a Scheme interpreter, however
247 you should take this opportunity to [get Scheme installed on your
248 computer](/how_to_get_the_programming_languages_running_on_your_computer), and
249 [get started learning Scheme](/learning_scheme). It will help you test out
250 proposed answers to the assignment.
251
252
253 There's also a (slow, bare-bones, but perfectly adequate) version of Scheme available for online use at <http://tryscheme.sourceforge.net/>.
254
255
256
257 Declarative/functional vs Imperatival/dynamic models of computation
258 ===================================================================
259
260 Many of you, like us, will have grown up thinking the paradigm of computation is a sequence of changes. Let go of that. It will take some care to separate the operative notion of "sequencing" here from other notions close to it, but once that's done, you'll see that languages that have no significant notions of sequencing or changes are Turing complete: they can perform any computation we know how to describe. In itself, that only puts them on equal footing with more mainstream, imperatival programming languages like C and Java and Python, which are also Turing complete. But further, the languages we want you to become familiar with can reasonably be understood to be more fundamental. They embody the elemental building blocks that computer scientists use when reasoning about and designing other languages.
261
262 Jim offered the metaphor: think of imperatival languages, which include "mutation" and "side-effects" (we'll flesh out these keywords as we proceeed), as the p&acirc;t&eacute; of computation. We want to teach you about the meat and potatoes, where as it turns out there is no sequencing and no changes. There's just the evaluation or simplification of complex expressions.
263
264 Now, when you ask the Scheme interpreter to simplify an expression for you, that's a kind of dynamic interaction between you and the interpreter. You may wonder then why these languages should not also be understood imperatively. The difference is that in a purely declarative or functional language, there are no dynamic effects in the language itself. It's just a static semantic fact about the language that one expression reduces to another. You may have verified that fact through your dynamic interactions with the Scheme interpreter, but that's different from saying that there are dynamic effects in the language itself.
265
266 What the latter would amount to will become clearer as we build our way up to languages which are genuinely imperatival or dynamic.
267
268 Many of the slogans and keywords we'll encounter in discussions of these issues call for careful interpretation. They mean various different things.
269
270 For example, you'll encounter the claim that declarative languages are distinguished by their **referential transparency.** What's meant by this is not always exactly the same, and as a cluster, it's related to but not the same as this means for philosophers and linguists.
271
272 The notion of **function** that we'll be working with will be one that, by default, sometimes counts as non-identical functions that map all their inputs to the very same outputs. For example, two functions from jumbled decks of cards to sorted decks of cards may use different algorithms and hence be different functions.
273
274 It's possible to enhance the lambda calculus so that functions do get identified when they map all the same inputs to the same outputs. This is called making the calculus **extensional**. Church called languages which didn't do this **intensional**. If you try to understand that kind of "intensionality" in terms of functions from worlds to extensions (an idea also associated with Church), you may hurt yourself. So too if you try to understand it in terms of mental stereotypes, another notion sometimes designated by "intension."
275
276 It's often said that dynamic systems are distinguished because they are the ones in which **order matters**. However, there are many ways in which order can matter. If we have a trivalent boolean system, for example---easily had in a purely functional calculus---we might choose to give a truth-table like this for "and":
277
278         true and true   = true
279         true and *      = *
280         true and false  = false
281         * and true      = *
282         * and *         = *
283         * and false     = *
284         false and true  = false
285         false and *     = false
286         false and false = false
287
288 And then we'd notice that `* and false` has a different intepretation than `false and *`. (The same phenomenon is already present with the material conditional in bivalent logics; but seeing that a non-symmetric semantics for `and` is available even for functional languages is instructive.)
289
290 Another way in which order can matter that's present even in functional languages is that the interpretation of some complex expressions can depend on the order in which sub-expressions are evaluated. Evaluated in one order, the computations might never terminate (and so semantically we interpret them as having "the bottom value"---we'll discuss this). Evaluated in another order, they might have a perfectly mundane value. Here's an example, though we'll reserve discussion of it until later:
291
292         (\x. y) ((\x. x x) (\x. x x))
293
294 Again, these facts are all part of the metatheory of purely functional languages. But *there is* a different sense of "order matters" such that it's only in imperatival languages that order so matters.
295
296         x := 2
297         x := x + 1
298         x == 3
299
300 Here the comparison in the last line will evaluate to true.
301
302         x := x + 1
303         x := 2
304         x == 3
305
306 Here the comparison in the last line will evaluate to false.
307
308 One of our goals for this course is to get you to understand *what is* that new
309 sense such that only so matters in imperatival languages.
310
311 Finally, you'll see the term **dynamic** used in a variety of ways in the literature for this course:
312
313 *       dynamic versus static typing
314
315 *       dynamic versus lexical scoping
316
317 *       dynamic versus static control operators
318
319 *       finally, we're used ourselves to talking about dynamic versus static semantics
320
321 For the most part, these uses are only loosely connected to each other. We'll tend to use "imperatival" to describe the kinds of semantic properties made available in dynamic semantics, languages which have robust notions of sequencing changes, and so on.
322
323 To read further about the relation between declarative or functional programming, on the one hand, and imperatival programming on the other, you can begin here:
324
325 *       [[!wikipedia Declarative programming]]
326 *       [[!wikipedia Functional programming]]
327 *       [[!wikipedia Purely functional]]
328 *       [[!wikipedia Referential transparency (computer science)]]
329 *       [[!wikipedia Imperative programming]]
330
331
332
333 Map
334 ===
335
336 <table>
337 <tr>
338 <td width=30%>Scheme (functional part)</td>
339 <td width=30%>OCaml (functional part)</td>
340 <td width=30%>C, Java, Pasval<br>
341 Scheme (imperative part)<br>
342 OCaml (imperative part)</td>
343 <tr>
344 <td width=30%>untyped lambda calculus<br>
345 combinatorial logic</td>
346 <tr>
347 <td colspan=3 align=center>--------------------------------------------------- Turing complete ---------------------------------------------------</td>
348 <tr>
349 <td width=30%>&nbsp;
350 <td width=30%>more advanced type systems, such as polymorphic types
351 <td width=30%>&nbsp;
352 <tr>
353 <td width=30%>&nbsp;
354 <td width=30%>simply-typed lambda calculus (what linguists mostly use)
355 <td width=30%>&nbsp;
356 </table>
357
358
359 Rosetta Stone
360 =============
361
362 Here's how it looks to say the same thing in various of these languages.
363
364 The following site may be useful; it lets you run a Scheme interpreter inside your web browser:
365
366 *       [Try Scheme in your web browser](http://tryscheme.sourceforge.net/)
367
368 &nbsp;
369
370 1.      Function application and parentheses
371
372         In Scheme and the lambda calculus, the functions you're applying always go to the left. So you write `(foo 2)` and also `(+ 2 3)`.
373
374         Mostly that's how OCaml is written too:
375
376                 foo 2
377
378         But a few familiar binary operators can be written infix, so:
379
380                 2 + 3
381
382         You can also write them operator-leftmost, if you put them inside parentheses to help the parser understand you:
383
384                 ( + ) 2 3
385
386         I'll mostly do this, for uniformity with Scheme and the lambda calculus.
387
388         In OCaml and the lambda calculus, this:
389
390                 foo 2 3
391
392         means the same as:
393
394                 ((foo 2) 3)
395
396         These functions are "curried". `foo 2` returns a `2`-fooer, which waits for an argument like `3` and then foos `2` to it. `( + ) 2` returns a `2`-adder, which waits for an argument like `3` and then adds `2` to it. For further reading: 
397
398 *       [[!wikipedia Currying]]
399
400         In Scheme, on the other hand, there's a difference between `((foo 2) 3)` and `(foo 2 3)`. Scheme distinguishes between unary functions that return unary functions and binary functions. For our seminar purposes, it will be easiest if you confine yourself to unary functions in Scheme as much as possible.
401
402         Scheme is very sensitive to parentheses and whenever you want a function applied to any number of arguments, you need to wrap the function and its arguments in a parentheses. So you have to write `(foo 2)`; if you only say `foo 2`, Scheme won't understand you.
403
404         Scheme uses a lot of parentheses, and they are always significant, never optional. Often the parentheses mean "apply this function to these arguments," as just described. But in a moment we'll see other constructions in Scheme where the parentheses have different roles. They do lots of different work in Scheme.
405
406
407 2.      Binding suitable values to the variables `three` and `two`, and adding them.
408
409         In Scheme:
410
411                 (let* ((three 3))
412                           (let* ((two 2))
413                                    (+ three two)))
414
415         Most of the parentheses in this construction *aren't* playing the role of applying a function to some arguments---only the ones in `(+ three two)` are doing that.
416
417
418         In OCaml:
419
420                 let three = 3 in
421                         let two = 2 in
422                                 ( + ) three two
423
424         In the lambda calculus:
425
426         Here we're on our own, we don't have predefined constants like `+` and `3` and `2` to work with. We've got to build up everything from scratch. We'll be seeing how to do that over the next weeks.
427
428         But supposing you had constructed appropriate values for `+` and `3` and `2`, you'd place them in the ellided positions in:
429
430                 (((\three (\two ((... three) two))) ...) ...)
431         
432         In an ordinary imperatival language like C:
433
434                 int three = 3;
435                 int two = 2;
436                 three + two;
437
438 2.      Mutation
439
440         In C this looks almost the same as what we had before:
441
442                 int x = 3;
443                 x = 2;
444
445         Here we first initialize `x` to hold the value 3; then we mutate `x` to hold a new value.
446
447         In (the imperatival part of) Scheme, this could be done as:
448
449                 (let ((x (box 3)))
450                          (set-box! x 2))
451
452         In general, mutating operations in Scheme are named with a trailing `!`. There are other imperatival constructions, though, like `(print ...)`, that don't follow that convention.
453
454         In (the imperatival part of) OCaml, this could be done as:
455
456                 let x = ref 3 in
457                         x := 2
458
459         Of course you don't need to remember any of this syntax. We're just illustrating it so that you see that in Scheme and OCaml it looks somewhat different than we had above. The difference is much more obvious than it is in C.
460
461         In the lambda calculus:
462
463         Sorry, you can't do mutation. At least, not natively. Later in the term we'll be learning how in fact, really, you can embed mutation inside the lambda calculus even though the lambda calculus has no primitive facilities for mutation.
464
465
466
467
468 3.      Anonymous functions
469
470         Functions are "first-class values" in the lambda calculus, in Scheme, and in OCaml. What that means is that they can be arguments to, and results of, other functions. They can be stored in data structures. And so on. To read further:
471
472         *       [[!wikipedia Higher-order function]]
473         *       [[!wikipedia First-class function]]
474
475         We'll begin by looking at what "anonymous" functions look like. These are functions that have not been bound as values to any variables. That is, there are no variables whose value they are.
476
477         In the lambda calculus:
478
479                 (\x M)
480
481         ---where `M` is any simple or complex expression---is anonymous. It's only when you do:
482
483                 ((\y N) (\x M))
484
485         that `(\x M)` has a "name" (it's named `y` during the evaluation of `N`).
486
487         In Scheme, the same thing is written:
488
489                 (lambda (x) M)
490
491         Not very different, right? For example, if `M` stands for `(+ 3 x)`, then here is an anonymous function that adds 3 to whatever argument it's given:
492
493                 (lambda (x) (+ 3 x))
494
495         In OCaml, we write our anonymous function like this:
496
497                 fun x -> ( + ) 3 x
498
499
500 4.      Supplying an argument to an anonymous function
501
502         Just because the functions we built aren't named doesn't mean we can't do anything with them. We can give them arguments. For example, in Scheme we can say:
503
504                 ((lambda (x) (+ 3 x)) 2)
505
506         The outermost parentheses here mean "apply the function `(lambda (x) (+ 3 x))` to the argument `2`, or equivalently, "give the value `2` as an argument to the function `(lambda (x) (+ 3 x))`.
507
508         In OCaml:
509
510                 (fun x -> ( + ) 3 x) 2
511
512
513 5.      Binding variables to values with "let"
514
515         Let's go back and re-consider this Scheme expression:
516
517                 (let* ((three 3))
518                           (let* ((two 2))
519                                    (+ three two)))
520
521         Scheme also has a simple `let` (without the ` *`), and it permits you to group several variable bindings together in a single `let`- or `let*`-statement, like this:
522
523                 (let* ((three 3) (two 2))
524                           (+ three two))
525
526         Often you'll get the same results whether you use `let*` or `let`. However, there are cases where it makes a difference, and in those cases, `let*` behaves more like you'd expect. So you should just get into the habit of consistently using that. It's also good discipline for this seminar, especially while you're learning, to write things out the longer way, like this:
527
528                 (let* ((three 3))
529                           (let* ((two 2))
530                                    (+ three two)))
531
532         However, here you've got the double parentheses in `(let* ((three 3)) ...)`. They're doubled because the syntax permits more assignments than just the assignment of the value `3` to the variable `three`. Myself I tend to use `[` and `]` for the outer of these parentheses: `(let* [(three 3)] ...)`. Scheme can be configured to parse `[...]` as if they're just more `(...)`.
533
534         It was asked in seminar if the `3` could be replaced by a more complex expression. The answer is "yes". You could also write:
535
536                 (let* [(three (+ 1 2))]
537                           (let* [(two 2)]
538                                    (+ three two)))
539         
540         It was also asked whether the `(+ 1 2)` computation would be performed before or after it was bound to the variable `three`. That's a terrific question. Let's say this: both strategies could be reasonable designs for a language. We are going to discuss this carefully in coming weeks. In fact Scheme and OCaml make the same design choice. But you should think of the underlying form of the `let`-statement as not settling this by itself.
541
542         Repeating our starting point for reference:
543
544                 (let* [(three 3)]
545                           (let* [(two 2)]
546                                    (+ three two)))
547
548         Recall in OCaml this same computation was written:
549
550                 let three = 3 in
551                         let two = 2 in
552                                 ( + ) three two
553
554 6.      Binding with "let" is the same as supplying an argument to a lambda
555
556         The preceding expression in Scheme is exactly equivalent to:
557
558                 (((lambda (three) (lambda (two) (+ three two))) 3) 2)
559
560         The preceding expression in OCaml is exactly equivalent to:
561
562                 (fun three -> (fun two -> ( + ) three two)) 3 2
563
564         Read this several times until you understand it.
565
566 7.      Functions can also be bound to variables (and hence, cease being "anonymous").
567
568         In Scheme:
569
570                 (let* [(bar (lambda (x) B))] M)
571
572         then wherever `bar` occurs in `M` (and isn't rebound by a more local `let` or `lambda`), it will be interpreted as the function `(lambda (x) B)`.
573
574         Similarly, in OCaml:
575
576                 let bar = fun x -> B in
577                         M
578
579         This in Scheme:
580
581                 (let* [(bar (lambda (x) B))] (bar A))
582
583         as we've said, means the same as:
584
585                 ((lambda (bar) (bar A)) (lambda (x) B))
586
587         which beta-reduces to:
588
589                 ((lambda (x) B) A)
590
591         and that means the same as:
592
593                 (let* [(x A)] B)
594
595         in other words: evaluate `B` with `x` assigned to the value `A`.
596
597         Similarly, this in OCaml:
598
599                 let bar = fun x -> B in
600                         bar A
601
602         is equivalent to:
603
604                 (fun x -> B) A
605
606         and that means the same as:
607
608                 let x = A in
609                         B
610
611 8.      Pushing a "let"-binding from now until the end
612
613         What if you want to do something like this, in Scheme?
614
615                 (let* [(x A)] ... for the rest of the file or interactive session ...)
616
617         or this, in OCaml:
618
619                 let x = A in
620                         ... for the rest of the file or interactive session ...
621
622         Scheme and OCaml have syntactic shorthands for doing this. In Scheme it's written like this:
623
624                 (define x A)
625                 ... rest of the file or interactive session ...
626
627         In OCaml it's written like this:
628
629                 let x = A;;
630                 ... rest of the file or interactive session ...
631
632         It's easy to be lulled into thinking this is a kind of imperative construction. *But it's not!* It's really just a shorthand for the compound `let`-expressions we've already been looking at, taking the maximum syntactically permissible scope. (Compare the "dot" convention in the lambda calculus, discussed above. I'm fudging a bit here, since in Scheme `(define ...)` is really shorthand for a `letrec` epression, which we'll come to in later classes.)
633
634 9.      Some shorthand
635
636         OCaml permits you to abbreviate:
637
638                 let bar = fun x -> B in
639                         M
640
641         as:
642
643                 let bar x = B in
644                         M
645
646         It also permits you to abbreviate:
647
648                 let bar = fun x -> B;;
649
650         as:
651
652                 let bar x = B;;
653
654         Similarly, Scheme permits you to abbreviate:
655
656                 (define bar (lambda (x) B))
657
658         as:
659
660                 (define (bar x) B)
661
662         and this is the form you'll most often see Scheme definitions written in.
663
664         However, conceptually you should think backwards through the abbreviations and equivalences we've just presented.
665
666                 (define (bar x) B)
667
668         just means:
669
670                 (define bar (lambda (x) B))
671
672         which just means:
673
674                 (let* [(bar (lambda (x) B))] ... rest of the file or interactive session ...)
675
676         which just means:
677
678                 (lambda (bar) ... rest of the file or interactive session ...) (lambda (x) B)
679
680         or in other words, interpret the rest of the file or interactive session with `bar` assigned the function `(lambda (x) B)`.
681
682
683 10.     Shadowing
684
685         You can override a binding with a more inner binding to the same variable. For instance the following expression in OCaml:
686
687                 let x = 3 in
688                         let x = 2 in
689                                 x
690
691         will evaluate to 2, not to 3. It's easy to be lulled into thinking this is the same as what happens when we say in C:
692
693                 int x = 3;
694                 x = 2;
695         
696         <em>but it's not the same!</em> In the latter case we have mutation, in the former case we don't. You will learn to recognize the difference as we proceed.
697
698         The OCaml expression just means:
699
700                 (fun x -> ((fun x -> x) 2) 3)
701
702         and there's no more mutation going on there than there is in:
703
704         <pre><code>&forall;x. (F x or &forall;x (not (F x)))
705         </code></pre>
706
707         When a previously-bound variable is rebound in the way we see here, that's called **shadowing**: the outer binding is shadowed during the scope of the inner binding.
708
709         See also:
710
711         *       [[!wikipedia Variable shadowing]]
712
713
714 Some more comparisons between Scheme and OCaml
715 ----------------------------------------------
716
717 *       Simple predefined values
718
719         Numbers in Scheme: `2`, `3`  
720         In OCaml: `2`, `3`
721
722         Booleans in Scheme: `#t`, `#f`  
723         In OCaml: `true`, `false`
724
725         The eighth letter in the Latin alphabet, in Scheme: `#\h`  
726         In OCaml: `'h'`
727
728 *       Compound values
729
730         These are values which are built up out of (zero or more) simple values.
731
732         Ordered pairs in Scheme: `'(2 . 3)` or `(cons 2 3)`  
733         In OCaml: `(2, 3)`
734
735         Lists in Scheme: `'(2 3)` or `(list 2 3)`  
736         In OCaml: `[2; 3]`  
737         We'll be explaining the difference between pairs and lists next week.
738
739         The empty list, in Scheme: `'()` or `(list)`  
740         In OCaml: `[]`
741
742         The string consisting just of the eighth letter of the Latin alphabet, in Scheme: `"h"`  
743         In OCaml: `"h"`
744
745         A longer string, in Scheme: `"horse"`  
746         In OCaml: `"horse"`
747
748         A shorter string, in Scheme: `""`  
749         In OCaml: `""`
750
751
752
753 What "sequencing" is and isn't
754 ------------------------------
755
756 We mentioned before the idea that computation is a sequencing of some changes. I said we'd be discussing (fragments of, and in some cases, entire) languages that have no native notion of change.
757
758 Neither do they have any useful notion of sequencing. But what this would be takes some care to identify.
759
760 First off, the mere concatenation of expressions isn't what we mean by sequencing. Concatenation of expressions is how you build syntactically complex expressions out of simpler ones. The complex expressions often express a computation where a function is applied to one (or more) arguments,
761
762 Second, the kind of rebinding we called "shadowing" doesn't involve any changes or sequencing. All the precedence facts about that kind of rebinding are just consequences of the compound syntactic structures in which it occurs.
763
764 Third, the kinds of bindings we see in:
765
766         (define foo A)
767         (foo 2)
768
769 Or even:
770
771         (define foo A)
772         (define foo B)
773         (foo 2)
774
775 don't involve any changes or sequencing in the sense we're trying to identify. As we said, these programs are just syntactic variants of (single) compound syntactic structures involving `let`s and `lambda`s.
776
777 Since Scheme and OCaml also do permit imperatival constructions, they do have syntax for genuine sequencing. In Scheme it looks like this:
778
779         (begin A B C)
780
781 In OCaml it looks like this:
782
783         begin A; B; C end
784
785 Or this:
786
787         (A; B; C)
788
789 In the presence of imperatival elements, sequencing order is very relevant. For example, these will behave differently:
790
791         (begin (print "under") (print "water"))
792         
793         (begin (print "water") (print "under"))
794
795 And so too these:
796
797         begin x := 3; x := 2; x end
798
799         begin x := 2; x := 3; x end
800
801 However, if A and B are purely functional, non-imperatival expressions, then:
802
803         begin A; B; C end
804
805 just evaluates to C (so long as A and B evaluate to something at all). So:
806
807         begin A; B; C end
808
809 contributes no more to a larger context in which it's embedded than C does. This is the sense in which functional languages have no serious notion of sequencing.
810
811 We'll discuss this more as the seminar proceeds.
812
813
814
815