4a4e06d2a36f5b6ad49072453ffc9b0533b11ff5
[lambda.git] / assignment5.mdwn
1 Assignment 5
2
3 Types and OCAML
4 ---------------
5
6 0. Recall that the S combinator is given by \x y z. x z (y z).
7    Give two different typings for this function in OCAML.
8    To get you started, here's one typing for K:
9
10     # let k (y:'a) (n:'b) = y;;
11     val k : 'a -> 'b -> 'a = [fun]
12     # k 1 true;;
13     - : int = 1
14
15
16 1. Which of the following expressions is well-typed in OCAML?  
17    For those that are, give the type of the expression as a whole.
18    For those that are not, why not?
19
20     let rec f x = f x;;
21
22     let rec f x = f f;;
23
24     let rec f x = f x in f f;;
25
26     let rec f x = f x in f ();;
27
28     let rec f () = f f;;
29
30     let rec f () = f ();;
31
32     let rec f () = f () in f f;;
33
34     let rec f () = f () in f ();;
35
36 2. Throughout this problem, assume that we have 
37
38     let rec omega x = omega x;;
39
40    All of the following are well-typed.
41    Which ones terminate?  What are the generalizations?
42
43     omega;;
44
45     omega ();;
46
47     fun () -> omega ();;
48
49     (fun () -> omega ()) ();;
50
51     if true then omega else omega;;
52
53     if false then omega else omega;;
54
55     if true then omega else omega ();;
56
57     if false then omega else omega ();;
58
59     if true then omega () else omega;;
60
61     if false then omega () else omega;;
62
63     if true then omega () else omega ();;
64
65     if false then omega () else omega ();;
66
67     let _ = omega in 2;;
68
69     let _ = omega () in 2;;
70
71 3. This problem is to begin thinking about controlling order of evaluation.
72 The following expression is an attempt to make explicit the
73 behavior of `if`-`then`-`else` explored in the previous question.
74 The idea is to define an `if`-`then`-`else` expression using 
75 other expression types.  So assume that "yes" is any OCAML expression,
76 and "no" is any other OCAML expression (of the same type as "yes"!),
77 and that "bool" is any boolean.  Then we can try the following:
78 "if bool then yes else no" should be equivalent to
79
80     let b = bool in
81     let y = yes in 
82     let n = no in 
83     match b with true -> y | false -> n
84
85 This almost works.  For instance, 
86
87     if true then 1 else 2;;
88
89 evaluates to 1, and 
90
91     let b = true in let y = 1 in let n = 2 in 
92     match b with true -> y | false -> n;;
93
94 also evaluates to 1.  Likewise,
95
96     if false then 1 else 2;;
97
98 and
99
100     let b = false in let y = 1 in let n = 2 in 
101     match b with true -> y | false -> n;;
102
103 both evaluate to 2.
104
105 However,
106
107     let rec omega x = omega x in 
108     if true then omega else omega ();;
109
110 terminates, but 
111
112     let rec omega x = omega x in 
113     let b = true in
114     let y = omega in 
115     let n = omega () in 
116     match b with true -> y | false -> n;;
117
118 does not terminate.  Incidentally, `match bool with true -> yes |
119 false -> no;;` works as desired, but your assignment is to solve it
120 without using the magical evaluation order properties of either `if`
121 or of `match`.  That is, you must keep the `let` statements, though
122 you're allowed to adjust what `b`, `y`, and `n` get assigned to.
123
124 [[Hint assignment 5 problem 3]]
125
126 Baby monads
127 -----------
128
129    Read the lecture notes for week 6, then write a
130    function `lift` that generalized the correspondence between + and
131    `add`: that is, `lift` takes any two-place operation on integers
132    and returns a version that takes arguments of type `int option`
133    instead, returning a result of `int option`.  In other words,
134    `lift` will have type
135
136      (int -> int -> int) -> (int option) -> (int option) -> (int option)
137
138    so that `lift (+) (Some 3) (Some 4)` will evalute to `Some 7`.  
139    Don't worry about why you need to put `+` inside of parentheses.
140    You should make use of `bind` in your definition of `lift`:
141
142     let bind (x: int option) (f: int -> (int option)) = 
143       match x with None -> None | Some n -> f n;;
144
145
146 Booleans, Church numbers, and Church lists in OCAML
147 ---------------------------------------------------
148
149 These questions adapted from web materials written by some smart dude named Acar.
150 The idea is to get booleans, Church numbers, "Church" lists, and
151 binary trees working in OCAML.
152
153    Recall from class System F, or the polymorphic λ-calculus.
154
155     τ ::= α | τ1 → τ2 | ∀α. τ
156     e ::= x | λx:τ. e | e1 e2 | Λα. e | e [τ ]
157
158    Recall that bool may be encoded as follows:
159
160     bool := ∀α. α → α → α
161     true := Λα. λt:α. λf :α. t
162     false := Λα. λt:α. λf :α. f
163
164    (where τ indicates the type of e1 and e2)
165
166    Note that each of the following terms, when applied to the
167    appropriate arguments, return a result of type bool.
168
169     (a) the term not that takes an argument of type bool and computes its negation;
170     (b) the term and that takes two arguments of type bool and computes their conjunction;
171     (c) the term or that takes two arguments of type bool and computes their disjunction.
172
173    The type nat (for "natural number") may be encoded as follows:
174
175     nat := ∀α. α → (α → α) → α
176     zero := Λα. λz:α. λs:α → α. z
177     succ := λn:nat. Λα. λz:α. λs:α → α. s (n [α] z s)
178
179    A nat n is defined by what it can do, which is to compute a function iterated n times. In the polymorphic
180    encoding above, the result of that iteration can be any type α, as long as you have a base element z : α and
181    a function s : α → α.
182
183    **Excercise**: get booleans and Church numbers working in OCAML,
184      including OCAML versions of bool, true, false, zero, succ, add.
185
186    Consider the following list type:
187
188     type ’a list = Nil | Cons of ’a * ’a list
189
190    We can encode τ lists, lists of elements of type τ as follows:
191
192     τ list := ∀α. α → (τ → α → α) → α
193     nilτ := Λα. λn:α. λc:τ → α → α. n
194     makeListτ := λh:τ. λt:τ list. Λα. λn:α. λc:τ → α → α. c h (t [α] n c)
195
196    As with nats, recursion is built into the datatype.
197
198    We can write functions like map:
199
200     map : (σ → τ ) → σ list → τ list
201       := λf :σ → τ. λl:σ list. l [τ list] nilτ (λx:σ. λy:τ list. consτ (f x) y
202
203    **Excercise** convert this function to OCAML.  Also write an `append` function.
204    Test with simple lists.
205
206    Consider the following simple binary tree type:
207
208     type ’a tree = Leaf | Node of ’a tree * ’a * ’a tree
209
210    **Excercise**
211    Write a function `sumLeaves` that computes the sum of all the
212    leaves in an int tree.
213
214    Write a function `inOrder` : τ tree → τ list that computes the in-order traversal of a binary tree. You
215    may assume the above encoding of lists; define any auxiliary functions you need.