edits
authorChris Barker <barker@omega.(none)>
Sun, 31 Oct 2010 14:19:28 +0000 (10:19 -0400)
committerChris Barker <barker@omega.(none)>
Sun, 31 Oct 2010 14:19:28 +0000 (10:19 -0400)
week7.mdwn

index 52bc8eb..a78a77e 100644 (file)
@@ -105,14 +105,14 @@ them from hurting the people that use them or themselves.
      object, we have `(unit x) * f == f x`.  For instance, `unit` is a
      function of type `'a -> 'a option`, so we have
 
      object, we have `(unit x) * f == f x`.  For instance, `unit` is a
      function of type `'a -> 'a option`, so we have
 
-<pre>
-# let ( * ) m f = match m with None -> None | Some n -> f n;;
-val ( * ) : 'a option -> ('a -> 'b option) -> 'b option = <fun>
-# let unit x = Some x;;
-val unit : 'a -> 'a option = <fun>
-# unit 2 * unit;;
-- : int option = Some 2
-</pre>
+    <pre>
+    # let ( * ) m f = match m with None -> None | Some n -> f n;;
+    val ( * ) : 'a option -> ('a -> 'b option) -> 'b option = <fun>
+    # let unit x = Some x;;
+    val unit : 'a -> 'a option = <fun>
+    # unit 2 * unit;;
+    - : int option = Some 2
+    </pre>
 
        The parentheses is the magic for telling Ocaml that the
        function to be defined (in this case, the name of the function
 
        The parentheses is the magic for telling Ocaml that the
        function to be defined (in this case, the name of the function