update for rename of topics/week1_advanced_notes.mdwn to topics/week1_kapulet_advance...
authorjim <jim@web>
Sat, 7 Feb 2015 15:04:13 +0000 (10:04 -0500)
committerLinux User <ikiwiki@localhost.members.linode.com>
Sat, 7 Feb 2015 15:04:13 +0000 (10:04 -0500)
rosetta1.mdwn

index bd2da5a..fa18958 100644 (file)
@@ -158,7 +158,7 @@ Here the last displayed line will fail, because `add` expects as its argument a
 Kapulet essentially works like OCaml and Haskell; though for pedagogical reasons we started out by introducing uncurried definitions, rather than the *curried* definitions those other languages predominantly use.
 
 <a id=sections></a>
 Kapulet essentially works like OCaml and Haskell; though for pedagogical reasons we started out by introducing uncurried definitions, rather than the *curried* definitions those other languages predominantly use.
 
 <a id=sections></a>
-[[As we mentioned in the course notes|topics/week1_advanced_notes#sections]], in Kapulet, OCaml, and Haskell, there is a shorthand that enables you to write things like:
+[[As we mentioned in the course notes|topics/week1_kapulet_advanced#sections]], in Kapulet, OCaml, and Haskell, there is a shorthand that enables you to write things like:
 
     # Kapulet
     let
 
     # Kapulet
     let
@@ -446,7 +446,7 @@ Kapulet's `dup` isn't predefined in Haskell but can be easily expressed as `\x -
 
 These are the same in Kapulet and Haskell (modulo the differences between [[Kapulet's multivalues|topics/week1_kapulet_intro#lightweight]] or "lightweight tuples" and Haskell's tuples): `id`, `const`, `flip`, `curry`, `uncurry`. None of these are predefined in OCaml.
 
 
 These are the same in Kapulet and Haskell (modulo the differences between [[Kapulet's multivalues|topics/week1_kapulet_intro#lightweight]] or "lightweight tuples" and Haskell's tuples): `id`, `const`, `flip`, `curry`, `uncurry`. None of these are predefined in OCaml.
 
-Kapulet and Haskell both have `( $ )`, which was explained [[in the course notes|topics/week1_advanced_notes#dollar]]. OCaml expresses this as `( @@ )`. (OCaml also uses `|>` to express the converse operation: `f x`, `f @@ x` and `x |> f` all mean the same.)
+Kapulet and Haskell both have `( $ )`, which was explained [[in the course notes|topics/week1_kapulet_advanced#dollar]]. OCaml expresses this as `( @@ )`. (OCaml also uses `|>` to express the converse operation: `f x`, `f @@ x` and `x |> f` all mean the same.)
 
 
 
 
 
 
@@ -492,7 +492,7 @@ Note there is no closing `end` or `}`. You can enclose the whole expression in p
       | 1 -> result1
       | x -> resultx
 
       | 1 -> result1
       | x -> resultx
 
-The syntax for [[guards|topics/week1_advanced_notes#guards]] and [[as-patterns|topics/week1_advanced_notes#as-patterns]] also only varies slightly between these languages:
+The syntax for [[guards|topics/week1_kapulet_advanced#guards]] and [[as-patterns|topics/week1_kapulet_advanced#as-patterns]] also only varies slightly between these languages:
 
     # Kapulet
     case some_expression of
 
     # Kapulet
     case some_expression of
@@ -791,7 +791,7 @@ Haskell's "toplevel interpreter" (ghci) permits a syntactic form that looks supe
     let x = 2
     x
 
     let x = 2
     x
 
-but under the covers something quite different is happening. (Specifically, you're working "inside the IO Monad", except that in this special context, expressions like `x` that don't evaluate to monadic values are permitted and evaluated. We don't expect that you will understand yet what any of this means.) If you're writing *in a file* that you want Haskell to interpret or compile, on the other hand, you have to do something a bit different (which you can't easily also do at the toplevel in ghci). [[Recall|topics/week1_advanced_notes#funct-declarations]] the shortcut by which we permitted:
+but under the covers something quite different is happening. (Specifically, you're working "inside the IO Monad", except that in this special context, expressions like `x` that don't evaluate to monadic values are permitted and evaluated. We don't expect that you will understand yet what any of this means.) If you're writing *in a file* that you want Haskell to interpret or compile, on the other hand, you have to do something a bit different (which you can't easily also do at the toplevel in ghci). [[Recall|topics/week1_kapulet_advanced#funct-declarations]] the shortcut by which we permitted:
 
     # Kapulet
     let
 
     # Kapulet
     let