translating: more about records
[lambda.git] / week7.mdwn
index e4e884b..7544425 100644 (file)
@@ -58,12 +58,11 @@ operations.  So we have to jack up the types of the inputs:
 
 <pre>
 let div' (u:int option) (v:int option) =
-  match v with
+  match u with
          None -> None
-    | Some 0 -> None
-       | Some y -> (match u with
-                                         None -> None
-                    | Some x -> Some (x / y));;
+       | Some x -> (match v with
+                                 Some 0 -> None
+                               | Some y -> Some (x / y));;
 
 (*
 val div' : int option -> int option -> int option = <fun>
@@ -165,7 +164,7 @@ theory of accommodation, and a theory of the situations in which
 material within the sentence can satisfy presuppositions for other
 material that otherwise would trigger a presupposition violation; but,
 not surprisingly, these refinements will require some more
-sophisticated techniques than the super-simple option monad.]
+sophisticated techniques than the super-simple Option monad.]
 
 
 Monads in General
@@ -228,7 +227,7 @@ that provides at least the following three elements:
 
        So `unit` is a way to put something inside of a monadic box. It's crucial
        to the usefulness of monads that there will be monadic boxes that
-       aren't the result of that operation. In the option/maybe monad, for
+       aren't the result of that operation. In the Option/Maybe monad, for
        instance, there's also the empty box `None`. In another (whimsical)
        example, you might have, in addition to boxes merely containing integers,
        special boxes that contain integers and also sing a song when they're opened. 
@@ -237,9 +236,9 @@ that provides at least the following three elements:
        most straightforward way to lift an ordinary value into a monadic value
        of the monadic type in question.
 
-*      Thirdly, an operation that's often called `bind`. This is another
+*      Thirdly, an operation that's often called `bind`. As we said before, this is another
        unfortunate name: this operation is only very loosely connected to
-       what linguists usually mean by "binding." In our option/maybe monad, the
+       what linguists usually mean by "binding." In our Option/Maybe monad, the
        bind operation is:
 
                let bind u f = match u with None -> None | Some x -> f x;;
@@ -261,7 +260,7 @@ that provides at least the following three elements:
 
        The guts of the definition of the `bind` operation amount to
        specifying how to unbox the monadic value `u`.  In the `bind`
-       operator for the option monad, we unboxed the monadic value by
+       operator for the Option monad, we unboxed the monadic value by
        matching it with the pattern `Some x`---whenever `u`
        happened to be a box containing an integer `x`, this allowed us to
        get our hands on that `x` and feed it to `f`.
@@ -282,7 +281,7 @@ that provides at least the following three elements:
        For each new monadic type, this has to be worked out in an
        useful way.
 
-So the "option/maybe monad" consists of the polymorphic `option` type, the
+So the "Option/Maybe monad" consists of the polymorphic `option` type, the
 `unit`/return function, and the `bind` function.
 
 
@@ -310,16 +309,16 @@ homework may recognize this last expression.  You can think of the
 notation like this: take the singing box `u` and evaluate it (which
 includes listening to the song).  Take the int contained in the
 singing box (the end result of evaluting `u`) and bind the variable
-`x` to that int.  So `x <- u` means "Sing me up an int, and I'll call
-it `x`".
+`x` to that int.  So `x <- u` means "Sing me up an int, which I'll call
+`x`".
 
 (Note that the above "do" notation comes from Haskell. We're mentioning it here
-because you're likely to see it when reading about monads. It won't work in
+because you're likely to see it when reading about monads. (See our page on [[Translating between OCaml Scheme and Haskell]].) It won't work in
 OCaml. In fact, the `<-` symbol already means something different in OCaml,
 having to do with mutable record fields. We'll be discussing mutation someday
 soon.)
 
-As we proceed, we'll be seeing a variety of other monad systems. For example, another monad is the list monad. Here the monadic type is:
+As we proceed, we'll be seeing a variety of other monad systems. For example, another monad is the List monad. Here the monadic type is:
 
        # type 'a list
 
@@ -346,7 +345,7 @@ of `'b list`s into a single `'b list`:
        # List.concat [[1]; [1;2]; [1;3]; [1;2;4]]
        - : int list = [1; 1; 2; 1; 3; 1; 2; 4]
 
-So now we've seen two monads: the option/maybe monad, and the list monad. For any
+So now we've seen two monads: the Option/Maybe monad, and the List monad. For any
 monadic system, there has to be a specification of the complex monad type,
 which will be parameterized on some simpler type `'a`, and the `unit`/return
 operation, and the `bind` operation. These will be different for different
@@ -366,78 +365,88 @@ Just like good robots, monads must obey three laws designed to prevent
 them from hurting the people that use them or themselves.
 
 *      **Left identity: unit is a left identity for the bind operation.**
-       That is, for all `f:'a -> 'a m`, where `'a m` is a monadic
-       type, we have `(unit x) * f == f x`.  For instance, `unit` is itself
+       That is, for all `f:'a -> 'b m`, where `'b m` is a monadic
+       type, we have `(unit x) >>= f == f x`.  For instance, `unit` is itself
        a function of type `'a -> 'a m`, so we can use it for `f`:
 
                # let unit x = Some x;;
                val unit : 'a -> 'a option = <fun>
-               # let ( * ) u f = match u with None -> None | Some x -> f x;;
-               val ( * ) : 'a option -> ('a -> 'b option) -> 'b option = <fun>
+               # let ( >>= ) u f = match u with None -> None | Some x -> f x;;
+               val ( >>= ) : 'a option -> ('a -> 'b option) -> 'b option = <fun>
 
        The parentheses is the magic for telling OCaml that the
        function to be defined (in this case, the name of the function
-       is `*`, pronounced "bind") is an infix operator, so we write
-       `u * f` or `( * ) u f` instead of `* u f`. Now:
+       is `>>=`, pronounced "bind") is an infix operator, so we write
+       `u >>= f` or equivalently `( >>= ) u f` instead of `>>= u
+       f`.
 
                # unit 2;;
                - : int option = Some 2
-               # unit 2 * unit;;
+               # unit 2 >>= unit;;
                - : int option = Some 2
 
+       Now, for a less trivial instance of a function from `int`s to `int option`s:
+
                # let divide x y = if 0 = y then None else Some (x/y);;
                val divide : int -> int -> int option = <fun>
                # divide 6 2;;
                - : int option = Some 3
-               # unit 2 * divide 6;;
+               # unit 2 >>= divide 6;;
                - : int option = Some 3
 
                # divide 6 0;;
                - : int option = None
-               # unit 0 * divide 6;;
+               # unit 0 >>= divide 6;;
                - : int option = None
 
 
 *      **Associativity: bind obeys a kind of associativity**. Like this:
 
-               (u * f) * g == u * (fun x -> f x * g)
+               (u >>= f) >>= g  ==  u >>= (fun x -> f x >>= g)
+
+       If you don't understand why the lambda form is necessary (the
+       "fun x -> ..." part), you need to look again at the type of `bind`.
 
-       If you don't understand why the lambda form is necessary (the "fun
-       x" part), you need to look again at the type of `bind`.
+       Wadler and others try to make this look nicer by phrasing it like this,
+       where U, V, and W are schematic for any expressions with the relevant monadic type:
 
-       Some examples of associativity in the option monad:
+               (U >>= fun x -> V) >>= fun y -> W  ==  U >>= fun x -> (V >>= fun y -> W)
 
-               # Some 3 * unit * unit;; 
+       Some examples of associativity in the Option monad (bear in
+       mind that in the Ocaml implementation of integer division, 2/3
+       evaluates to zero, throwing away the remainder):
+
+               # Some 3 >>= unit >>= unit;; 
                - : int option = Some 3
-               # Some 3 * (fun x -> unit x * unit);;
+               # Some 3 >>= (fun x -> unit x >>= unit);;
                - : int option = Some 3
 
-               # Some 3 * divide 6 * divide 2;;
+               # Some 3 >>= divide 6 >>= divide 2;;
                - : int option = Some 1
-               # Some 3 * (fun x -> divide 6 x * divide 2);;
+               # Some 3 >>= (fun x -> divide 6 x >>= divide 2);;
                - : int option = Some 1
 
-               # Some 3 * divide 2 * divide 6;;
+               # Some 3 >>= divide 2 >>= divide 6;;
                - : int option = None
-               # Some 3 * (fun x -> divide 2 x * divide 6);;
+               # Some 3 >>= (fun x -> divide 2 x >>= divide 6);;
                - : int option = None
 
-Of course, associativity must hold for *arbitrary* functions of
-type `'a -> 'a m`, where `m` is the monad type.  It's easy to
-convince yourself that the `bind` operation for the option monad
-obeys associativity by dividing the inputs into cases: if `u`
-matches `None`, both computations will result in `None`; if
-`u` matches `Some x`, and `f x` evalutes to `None`, then both
-computations will again result in `None`; and if the value of
-`f x` matches `Some y`, then both computations will evaluate
-to `g y`.
+       Of course, associativity must hold for *arbitrary* functions of
+       type `'a -> 'b m`, where `m` is the monad type.  It's easy to
+       convince yourself that the `bind` operation for the Option monad
+       obeys associativity by dividing the inputs into cases: if `u`
+       matches `None`, both computations will result in `None`; if
+       `u` matches `Some x`, and `f x` evalutes to `None`, then both
+       computations will again result in `None`; and if the value of
+       `f x` matches `Some y`, then both computations will evaluate
+       to `g y`.
 
 *      **Right identity: unit is a right identity for bind.**  That is, 
-       `u * unit == u` for all monad objects `u`.  For instance,
+       `u >>= unit == u` for all monad objects `u`.  For instance,
 
-               # Some 3 * unit;;
+               # Some 3 >>= unit;;
                - : int option = Some 3
-               # None * unit;;
+               # None >>= unit;;
                - : 'a option = None
 
 
@@ -447,41 +456,47 @@ More details about monads
 If you studied algebra, you'll remember that a *monoid* is an
 associative operation with a left and right identity.  For instance,
 the natural numbers along with multiplication form a monoid with 1
-serving as the left and right identity.  That is, temporarily using
-`*` to mean arithmetic multiplication, `1 * u == u == u * 1` for all
+serving as the left and right identity.  That is, `1 * u == u == u * 1` for all
 `u`, and `(u * v) * w == u * (v * w)` for all `u`, `v`, and `w`.  As
 presented here, a monad is not exactly a monoid, because (unlike the
 arguments of a monoid operation) the two arguments of the bind are of
 different types.  But it's possible to make the connection between
 monads and monoids much closer. This is discussed in [Monads in Category
-Theory](/advanced_notes/monads_in_category_theory).
-See also <http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Monad_Laws>.
+Theory](/advanced_topics/monads_in_category_theory).
+
+See also:
+
+*      [Haskell wikibook on Monad Laws](http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Monad_Laws).
+*      [Yet Another Haskell Tutorial on Monad Laws](http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/YAHT/Monads#Definition)
+*      [Haskell wikibook on Understanding Monads](http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/Understanding_monads)
+*      [Haskell wikibook on Advanced Monads](http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/Advanced_monads)
+*      [Haskell wikibook on do-notation](http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/do_Notation)
+*      [Yet Another Haskell Tutorial on do-notation](http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/YAHT/Monads#Do_Notation)
+
 
 Here are some papers that introduced monads into functional programming:
 
-*      [Eugenio Moggi, Notions of Computation and Monads](http://www.disi.unige.it/person/MoggiE/ftp/ic91.pdf): Information and Computation 93 (1) 1991.
+*      [Eugenio Moggi, Notions of Computation and Monads](http://www.disi.unige.it/person/MoggiE/ftp/ic91.pdf): Information and Computation 93 (1) 1991. Would be very difficult reading for members of this seminar. However, the following two papers should be accessible.
+
+*      [Philip Wadler. The essence of functional programming](http://homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/wadler/papers/essence/essence.ps):
+invited talk, *19'th Symposium on Principles of Programming Languages*, ACM Press, Albuquerque, January 1992.
+<!--   This paper explores the use monads to structure functional programs. No prior knowledge of monads or category theory is required.
+       Monads increase the ease with which programs may be modified. They can mimic the effect of impure features such as exceptions, state, and continuations; and also provide effects not easily achieved with such features. The types of a program reflect which effects occur.
+       The first section is an extended example of the use of monads. A simple interpreter is modified to support various extra features: error messages, state, output, and non-deterministic choice. The second section describes the relation between monads and continuation-passing style. The third section sketches how monads are used in a compiler for Haskell that is written in Haskell.-->
 
 *      [Philip Wadler. Monads for Functional Programming](http://homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/wadler/papers/marktoberdorf/baastad.pdf):
 in M. Broy, editor, *Marktoberdorf Summer School on Program Design
 Calculi*, Springer Verlag, NATO ASI Series F: Computer and systems
 sciences, Volume 118, August 1992. Also in J. Jeuring and E. Meijer,
 editors, *Advanced Functional Programming*, Springer Verlag, 
-LNCS 925, 1995. Some errata fixed August 2001.  This paper has a great first
-line: **Shall I be pure, or impure?**
+LNCS 925, 1995. Some errata fixed August 2001.
 <!--   The use of monads to structure functional programs is described. Monads provide a convenient framework for simulating effects found in other languages, such as global state, exception handling, output, or non-determinism. Three case studies are looked at in detail: how monads ease the modification of a simple evaluator; how monads act as the basis of a datatype of arrays subject to in-place update; and how monads can be used to build parsers.-->
 
-*      [Philip Wadler. The essence of functional programming](http://homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/wadler/papers/essence/essence.ps):
-invited talk, *19'th Symposium on Principles of Programming Languages*, ACM Press, Albuquerque, January 1992.
-<!--   This paper explores the use monads to structure functional programs. No prior knowledge of monads or category theory is required.
-       Monads increase the ease with which programs may be modified. They can mimic the effect of impure features such as exceptions, state, and continuations; and also provide effects not easily achieved with such features. The types of a program reflect which effects occur.
-       The first section is an extended example of the use of monads. A simple interpreter is modified to support various extra features: error messages, state, output, and non-deterministic choice. The second section describes the relation between monads and continuation-passing style. The third section sketches how monads are used in a compiler for Haskell that is written in Haskell.-->
-
-*      [Daniel Friedman. A Schemer's View of Monads](/schemersviewofmonads.ps): from <https://www.cs.indiana.edu/cgi-pub/c311/doku.php?id=home> but the link above is to a local copy.
 
-There's a long list of monad tutorials on the [[Offsite Reading]] page. Skimming the titles makes me laugh.
+There's a long list of monad tutorials on the [[Offsite Reading]] page. (Skimming the titles is somewhat amusing.) If you are confused by monads, make use of these resources. Read around until you find a tutorial pitched at a level that's helpful for you.
 
 In the presentation we gave above---which follows the functional programming conventions---we took `unit`/return and `bind` as the primitive operations. From these a number of other general monad operations can be derived. It's also possible to take some of the others as primitive. The [Monads in Category
-Theory](/advanced_notes/monads_in_category_theory) notes do so, for example.
+Theory](/advanced_topics/monads_in_category_theory) notes do so, for example.
 
 Here are some of the other general monad operations. You don't have to master these; they're collected here for your reference.
 
@@ -499,12 +514,12 @@ that is:
 
 You could also do `bind u (fun x -> v)`; we use the `_` for the function argument to be explicit that that argument is never going to be used.
 
-The `lift` operation we asked you to define for last week's homework is a common operation. The second argument to `bind` converts `'a` values into `'b m` values---that is, into instances of the monadic type. What if we instead had a function that merely converts `'a` values into `'b` values, and we want to use it with our monadic type. Then we "lift" that function into an operation on the monad. For example:
+The `lift` operation we asked you to define for last week's homework is a common operation. The second argument to `bind` converts `'a` values into `'b m` values---that is, into instances of the monadic type. What if we instead had a function that merely converts `'a` values into `'b` values, and we want to use it with our monadic type? Then we "lift" that function into an operation on the monad. For example:
 
        # let even x = (x mod 2 = 0);;
        val g : int -> bool = <fun>
 
-`even` has the type `int -> bool`. Now what if we want to convert it into an operation on the option/maybe monad?
+`even` has the type `int -> bool`. Now what if we want to convert it into an operation on the Option/Maybe monad?
 
        # let lift g = fun u -> bind u (fun x -> Some (g x));;
        val lift : ('a -> 'b) -> 'a option -> 'b option = <fun>
@@ -517,7 +532,7 @@ also define a lift operation for binary functions:
 
 `lift2 (+)` will now be a function from `int option`s  and `int option`s to `int option`s. This should look familiar to those who did the homework.
 
-The `lift` operation (just `lift`, not `lift2`) is sometimes also called the `map` operation. (In Haskell, they say `fmap` or `<$>`.) And indeed when we're working with the list monad, `lift f` is exactly `List.map f`!
+The `lift` operation (just `lift`, not `lift2`) is sometimes also called the `map` operation. (In Haskell, they say `fmap` or `<$>`.) And indeed when we're working with the List monad, `lift f` is exactly `List.map f`!
 
 Wherever we have a well-defined monad, we can define a lift/map operation for that monad. The examples above used `Some (g x)` and so on; in the general case we'd use `unit (g x)`, using the specific `unit` operation for the monad we're working with.
 
@@ -544,7 +559,7 @@ and so on. Here are the laws that any `ap` operation can be relied on to satisfy
        ap (unit f) (unit x) = unit (f x)
        ap u (unit x) = ap (unit (fun f -> f x)) u
 
-Another general monad operation is called `join`. This is the operation that takes you from an iterated monad to a single monad. Remember when we were explaining the `bind` operation for the list monad, there was a step where
+Another general monad operation is called `join`. This is the operation that takes you from an iterated monad to a single monad. Remember when we were explaining the `bind` operation for the List monad, there was a step where
 we went from:
 
        [[1]; [1;2]; [1;3]; [1;2;4]]
@@ -574,15 +589,15 @@ Monad outlook
 -------------
 
 We're going to be using monads for a number of different things in the
-weeks to come.  The first main application will be the State monad,
+weeks to come.  One major application will be the State monad,
 which will enable us to model mutation: variables whose values appear
 to change as the computation progresses.  Later, we will study the
 Continuation monad.
 
-In the meantime, we'll look at several linguistic applications for monads, based
-on what's called the *reader monad*.
+But first, we'll look at several linguistic applications for monads, based
+on what's called the *Reader monad*.
 
-##[[Reader monad]]##
+##[[Reader Monad for Variable Binding]]##
 
-##[[Intensionality monad]]##
+##[[Reader Monad for Intensionality]]##