index,new_stuff
[lambda.git] / week7.mdwn
index 4c74015..7544425 100644 (file)
@@ -402,11 +402,16 @@ them from hurting the people that use them or themselves.
 
 *      **Associativity: bind obeys a kind of associativity**. Like this:
 
-               (u >>= f) >>= g == u >>= (fun x -> f x >>= g)
+               (u >>= f) >>= g  ==  u >>= (fun x -> f x >>= g)
 
        If you don't understand why the lambda form is necessary (the
        "fun x -> ..." part), you need to look again at the type of `bind`.
 
+       Wadler and others try to make this look nicer by phrasing it like this,
+       where U, V, and W are schematic for any expressions with the relevant monadic type:
+
+               (U >>= fun x -> V) >>= fun y -> W  ==  U >>= fun x -> (V >>= fun y -> W)
+
        Some examples of associativity in the Option monad (bear in
        mind that in the Ocaml implementation of integer division, 2/3
        evaluates to zero, throwing away the remainder):
@@ -426,15 +431,15 @@ them from hurting the people that use them or themselves.
                # Some 3 >>= (fun x -> divide 2 x >>= divide 6);;
                - : int option = None
 
-Of course, associativity must hold for *arbitrary* functions of
-type `'a -> 'b m`, where `m` is the monad type.  It's easy to
-convince yourself that the `bind` operation for the Option monad
-obeys associativity by dividing the inputs into cases: if `u`
-matches `None`, both computations will result in `None`; if
-`u` matches `Some x`, and `f x` evalutes to `None`, then both
-computations will again result in `None`; and if the value of
-`f x` matches `Some y`, then both computations will evaluate
-to `g y`.
+       Of course, associativity must hold for *arbitrary* functions of
+       type `'a -> 'b m`, where `m` is the monad type.  It's easy to
+       convince yourself that the `bind` operation for the Option monad
+       obeys associativity by dividing the inputs into cases: if `u`
+       matches `None`, both computations will result in `None`; if
+       `u` matches `Some x`, and `f x` evalutes to `None`, then both
+       computations will again result in `None`; and if the value of
+       `f x` matches `Some y`, then both computations will evaluate
+       to `g y`.
 
 *      **Right identity: unit is a right identity for bind.**  That is, 
        `u >>= unit == u` for all monad objects `u`.  For instance,
@@ -462,6 +467,7 @@ Theory](/advanced_topics/monads_in_category_theory).
 See also:
 
 *      [Haskell wikibook on Monad Laws](http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Monad_Laws).
+*      [Yet Another Haskell Tutorial on Monad Laws](http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/YAHT/Monads#Definition)
 *      [Haskell wikibook on Understanding Monads](http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/Understanding_monads)
 *      [Haskell wikibook on Advanced Monads](http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/Advanced_monads)
 *      [Haskell wikibook on do-notation](http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/do_Notation)