Revert "manip trees: deleted what I think was a spurious line"
[lambda.git] / week6.mdwn
index 1614972..2a4586a 100644 (file)
@@ -1,7 +1,36 @@
 [[!toc]]
 
-Types, OCaml
-------------
+Polymorphic Types and System F
+------------------------------
+
+[Notes still to be added. Hope you paid attention during seminar.]
+
+<!--
+
+8.     The simply-typed lambda calculus<p>
+9.     Parametric polymorphism, System F, "type inference"<p>
+
+1.     Product or record types, e.g. pairs and triples
+2.     Sum or variant types; tagged or "disjoint" unions
+3.     Maybe/option types; representing "out-of-band" values
+10.    [Phil/ling application] inner/outer domain semantics for positive free logic
+       <http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu/antonelli/papers/pegasus-JPL.pdf>
+11.    [Phil/ling application] King vs Schiffer in King 2007, pp 103ff. [which paper?](http://rci.rutgers.edu/~jeffreck/pub.php)
+12. [Phil/ling application] King and Pryor on that clauses, predicates vs singular property-designators
+       Russell On Denoting / Kaplan on plexy
+13.    Possible excursion: [Frege's "On Concept and Object"](http://www.persiangig.com/pages/download/?dl=http://sahmir.persiangig.com/document/Frege%27s%20Articles/On%20Concept%20And%20object%20%28Jstore%29.pdf)<p>
+
+6.     Inductive types (numbers, lists)
+
+5.     Unit type
+4.     Zero/bottom types
+7.     "Pattern-matching" or type unpacking<p>
+
+-->
+
+
+Types in OCaml
+--------------
 
 OCaml has type inference: the system can often infer what the type of
 an expression must be, based on the type of other known expressions.
@@ -44,9 +73,9 @@ Oh well.
 `==` operator instead of the `=` operator. Later when we discuss mutation,
 we'll discuss the difference between these two equality operations.
 Scheme has a similar pair, which they name `eq?` and `equal?`. In Python,
-these are `is` and `==` respectively. It's unfortunate that OCaml uses `==` for the opposite operation that Python and many other languages use it for. In any case, OCaml will understand `(f) == f` even though it doesn't understand
+these are `is` and `==` respectively. It's unfortunate that OCaml uses `==` for the opposite operation that Python and many other languages use it for. In any case, OCaml will accept `(f) == f` even though it doesn't accept
 `(f) = f`. However, don't expect it to figure out in general when two functions
-are identical. (That question is not Turing computable.)
+are equivalent. (That question is not Turing computable.)
 
        # (f) == (fun x -> x + 3);;
        - : bool = false
@@ -210,8 +239,8 @@ Now consider the following variations in behavior:
     # test ();;
     <Infinite loop, need to control-c to interrupt>
 
-We can use functions that take arguments of type unit to control
-execution.  In Scheme parlance, functions on the unit type are called
+We can use functions that take arguments of type `unit` to control
+execution.  In Scheme parlance, functions on the `unit` type are called
 *thunks* (which I've always assumed was a blend of "think" and "chunk").
 
 Question: why do thunks work? We know that `blackhole ()` doesn't terminate, so why do expressions like:
@@ -249,6 +278,8 @@ Here are some exercises that may help better understand this. Figure out what is
 
        let rec blackhole x = blackhole x in 2 :: (blackhole 1);;
 
+By the way, what's the type of this:
+
        let rec blackhole (x:'a) : 'a = blackhole x in blackhole
 
 
@@ -265,145 +296,8 @@ whether an expression that would diverge if we tried to fully evaluate it does
 diverge. As we consider richer languages, thunks will become more useful.
 
 
+Towards Monads
+--------------
+
+This has now been moved to the start of [[week7]].
 
-Dividing by zero: Towards Monads
---------------------------------
-
-So the integer division operation presupposes that its second argument
-(the divisor) is not zero, upon pain of presupposition failure.
-Here's what my OCaml interpreter says:
-
-    # 12/0;;
-    Exception: Division_by_zero.
-
-So we want to explicitly allow for the possibility that
-division will return something other than a number.
-We'll use OCaml's option type, which works like this:
-
-    # type 'a option = None | Some of 'a;;
-    # None;;
-    - : 'a option = None
-    # Some 3;;
-    - : int option = Some 3
-
-So if a division is normal, we return some number, but if the divisor is
-zero, we return None. As a mnemonic aid, we'll append a `'` to the end of our new divide function.
-
-<pre>
-let div' (x:int) (y:int) =
-  match y with 0 -> None |
-               _ -> Some (x / y);;
-
-(*
-val div' : int -> int -> int option = fun
-# div' 12 3;;
-- : int option = Some 4
-# div' 12 0;;
-- : int option = None
-# div' (div' 12 3) 2;;
-Characters 4-14:
-  div' (div' 12 3) 2;;
-      ^^^^^^^^^^
-Error: This expression has type int option
-       but an expression was expected of type int
-*)
-</pre>
-
-This starts off well: dividing 12 by 3, no problem; dividing 12 by 0,
-just the behavior we were hoping for.  But we want to be able to use
-the output of the safe-division function as input for further division
-operations.  So we have to jack up the types of the inputs:
-
-<pre>
-let div' (x:int option) (y:int option) =
-  match y with None -> None |
-               Some 0 -> None |
-               Some n -> (match x with None -> None |
-                                       Some m -> Some (m / n));;
-
-(*
-val div' : int option -> int option -> int option = <fun>
-# div' (Some 12) (Some 4);;
-- : int option = Some 3
-# div' (Some 12) (Some 0);;
-- : int option = None
-# div' (div' (Some 12) (Some 0)) (Some 4);;
-- : int option = None
-*)
-</pre>
-
-Beautiful, just what we need: now we can try to divide by anything we
-want, without fear that we're going to trigger any system errors.
-
-I prefer to line up the `match` alternatives by using OCaml's
-built-in tuple type:
-
-<pre>
-let div' (x:int option) (y:int option) =
-  match (x, y) with (None, _) -> None |
-                    (_, None) -> None |
-                    (_, Some 0) -> None |
-                    (Some m, Some n) -> Some (m / n);;
-</pre>
-
-So far so good.  But what if we want to combine division with
-other arithmetic operations?  We need to make those other operations
-aware of the possibility that one of their arguments will trigger a
-presupposition failure:
-
-<pre>
-let add' (x:int option) (y:int option) =
-  match (x, y) with (None, _) -> None |
-                    (_, None) -> None |
-                    (Some m, Some n) -> Some (m + n);;
-
-(*
-val add' : int option -> int option -> int option = <fun>
-# add' (Some 12) (Some 4);;
-- : int option = Some 16
-# add' (div' (Some 12) (Some 0)) (Some 4);;
-- : int option = None
-*)
-</pre>
-
-This works, but is somewhat disappointing: the `add'` operation
-doesn't trigger any presupposition of its own, so it is a shame that
-it needs to be adjusted because someone else might make trouble.
-
-But we can automate the adjustment.  The standard way in OCaml,
-Haskell, etc., is to define a `bind` operator (the name `bind` is not
-well chosen to resonate with linguists, but what can you do). To continue our mnemonic association, we'll put a `'` after the name "bind" as well.
-
-<pre>
-let bind' (x: int option) (f: int -> (int option)) =
-  match x with None -> None |
-               Some n -> f n;;
-
-let add' (x: int option) (y: int option)  =
-  bind' x (fun x -> bind' y (fun y -> Some (x + y)));;
-
-let div' (x: int option) (y: int option) =
-  bind' x (fun x -> bind' y (fun y -> if (0 = y) then None else Some (x / y)));;
-
-(*
-#  div' (div' (Some 12) (Some 2)) (Some 4);;
-- : int option = Some 1
-#  div' (div' (Some 12) (Some 0)) (Some 4);;
-- : int option = None
-# add' (div' (Some 12) (Some 0)) (Some 4);;
-- : int option = None
-*)
-</pre>
-
-Compare the new definitions of `add'` and `div'` closely: the definition
-for `add'` shows what it looks like to equip an ordinary operation to
-survive in dangerous presupposition-filled world.  Note that the new
-definition of `add'` does not need to test whether its arguments are
-None objects or real numbers---those details are hidden inside of the
-`bind'` function.
-
-The definition of `div'` shows exactly what extra needs to be said in
-order to trigger the no-division-by-zero presupposition.
-
-For linguists: this is a complete theory of a particularly simply form
-of presupposition projection (every predicate is a hole).