week4 debugging more
[lambda.git] / week4.mdwn
index 6ca6d68..bd3d8e5 100644 (file)
 [[!toc]]
 
-#These notes return to the topic of fixed point combiantors for one
- more return to the topic of fixed point combinators#
-
-Q: How do you know that every term in the untyped lambda calculus has
-a fixed point?
+#Q: How do you know that every term in the untyped lambda calculus has a fixed point?#
 
 A: That's easy: let `T` be an arbitrary term in the lambda calculus.  If
 `T` has a fixed point, then there exists some `X` such that `X <~~>
 TX` (that's what it means to *have* a fixed point).
 
-   let W = \x.T(xx) in
-   let X = WW in
-   X = WW = (\x.T(xx))W = T(WW) = TX
+<pre><code>let L = \x. T (x x) in
+let X = L L in
+X &equiv; L L &equiv; (\x. T (x x)) L ~~> T (L L) &equiv; T X
+</code></pre>
+
+Please slow down and make sure that you understand what justified each
+of the equalities in the last line.
 
-Q: How do you know that for any term T, YT is a fixed point of T?
+#Q: How do you know that for any term `T`, `Y T` is a fixed point of `T`?#
 
 A: Note that in the proof given in the previous answer, we chose `T`
-and then set `X = WW = (\x.T(xx))(\x.T(xx))`.  If we abstract over
-`T`, we get the Y combinator, `\T.(\x.T(xx))(\x.T(xx))`.  No matter
-what argument `T` we feed Y, it returns some `X` that is a fixed point
+and then set `X = L L = (\x. T (x x)) (\x. T (x x))`.  If we abstract over
+`T`, we get the Y combinator, `\T. (\x. T (x x)) (\x. T (x x))`.  No matter
+what argument `T` we feed `Y`, it returns some `X` that is a fixed point
 of `T`, by the reasoning in the previous answer.
 
-Q: So if every term has a fixed point, even Y has fixed point.
+#Q: So if every term has a fixed point, even `Y` has fixed point.#
 
 A: Right:
 
-    let Y = \T.(\x.T(xx))(\x.T(xx)) in
-    Y Y = \T.(\x.T(xx))(\x.T(xx)) Y
-        = (\x.Y(xx))(\x.Y(xx))
-        = Y((\x.Y(xx))(\x.Y(xx)))
-        = Y(Y((\x.Y(xx))(\x.Y(xx))))
-        = Y(Y(Y(...(Y(YY))...)))
+<pre><code>let Y = \T. (\x. T (x x)) (\x. T (x x)) in
+Y Y &equiv; \T. (\x. T (x x)) (\x. T (x x)) Y
+~~> (\x. Y (x x)) (\x. Y (x x))
+~~> Y ((\x. Y (x x)) (\x. Y (x x)))
+~~> Y (Y ((\x. Y (x x)) (\x. Y (x x))))
+~~> Y (Y (Y (...(Y (Y Y))...)))</code></pre>
+
 
-Q: Ouch!  Stop hurting my brain.
+#Q: Ouch!  Stop hurting my brain.#
 
-A: Let's come at it from the direction of arithmetic.  Recall that we
+A: Is that a question?
+
+Let's come at it from the direction of arithmetic.  Recall that we
 claimed that even `succ`---the function that added one to any
 number---had a fixed point.  How could there be an X such that X = X+1?
-Then
+That would imply that
 
-    X = succ X = succ (succ X) = succ (succ (succ (X))) = succ (... (succ X)...)
+    X <~~> succ X <~~> succ (succ X) <~~> succ (succ (succ (X))) <~~> succ (... (succ X)...)
 
 In other words, the fixed point of `succ` is a term that is its own
 successor.  Let's just check that `X = succ X`:
 
-    let succ = \n s z. s (n s z) in
-    let X = (\x.succ(xx))(\x.succ(xx)) in
-    succ X 
-      = succ ((\x.succ(xx))(\x.succ(xx))) 
-      = succ (succ ((\x.succ(xx))(\x.succ(xx))))
-      = succ (succ X)
-
-You should see the close similarity with YY here.
-
-Q. So `Y` applied to `succ` returns infinity!
-
-A. Yes!  Let's see why it makes sense to think of `Y succ` as a Church
-numeral:
-
-      [same definitions]
-      succ X
-      = (\n s z. s (n s z)) X 
-      = \s z. s (X s z)
-      = succ (\s z. s (X s z)) ; using fixed-point reasoning
-      = \s z. s ([succ (\s z. s (X s z))] s z)
-      = \s z. s ([\s z. s ([succ (\s z. s (X s z))] s z)] s z)
-      = \s z. s (s (succ (\s z. s (X s z))))
-
-So `succ X` looks like a numeral: it takes two arguments, `s` and `z`,
-and returns a sequence of nested applications of `s`...
-
-You should be able to prove that `add 2 (Y succ) <~~> Y succ`,
-likewise for `mult`, `minus`, `pow`.  What happens if we try `minus (Y
-succ)(Y succ)`?  What would you expect infinity minus infinity to be?
-(Hint: choose your evaluation strategy so that you add two `s`s to the
-first number for every `s` that you add to the second number.)
-
-This is amazing, by the way: we're proving things about a term that
-represents arithmetic infinity.  It's important to bear in mind the
-simplest term in question is not infinite:
-
-     Y succ = (\f.(\x.f(xx))(\x.f(xx)))(\n s z. s (n s z))
-
-The way that infinity enters into the picture is that this term has
-no normal form: no matter how many times we perform beta reduction,
-there will always be an opportunity for more beta reduction.  (Lather,
-rinse, repeat!)
-
-Q. That reminds me, what about [[evaluation order]]?
-
-A. For a recursive function that has a well-behaved base case, such as
-the factorial function, evaluation order is crucial.  In the following
-computation, we will arrive at a normal form.  Watch for the moment at
-which we have to make a choice about which beta reduction to perform
-next: one choice leads to a normal form, the other choice leads to
-endless reduction:
-
-    let prefac = \f n. isZero n 1 (mult n (f (pred n))) in
-    let fac = Y prefac in
-    fac 2
-       = [(\f.(\x.f(xx))(\x.f(xx))) prefac] 2
-       = [(\x.prefac(xx))(\x.prefac(xx))] 2
-       = [prefac((\x.prefac(xx))(\x.prefac(xx)))] 2
-       = [prefac(prefac((\x.prefac(xx))(\x.prefac(xx))))] 2
-       = [(\f n. isZero n 1 (mult n (f (pred n))))
-          (prefac((\x.prefac(xx))(\x.prefac(xx))))] 2
-       = [\n. isZero n 1 (mult n ([prefac((\x.prefac(xx))(\x.prefac(xx)))] (pred n)))] 2
-       = isZero 2 1 (mult 2 ([prefac((\x.prefac(xx))(\x.prefac(xx)))] (pred 2)))
-       = mult 2 ([prefac((\x.prefac(xx))(\x.prefac(xx)))] 1)
-       ...
-       = mult 2 (mult 1 ([prefac((\x.prefac(xx))(\x.prefac(xx)))] 0))
-       = mult 2 (mult 1 (isZero 0 1 ([prefac((\x.prefac(xx))(\x.prefac(xx)))] (pred 0))))
-       = mult 2 (mult 1 1)
-       = mult 2 1
-       = 2
-
-The crucial step is the third from the last.  We have our choice of
-either evaluating the test `isZero 0 1 ...`, which evaluates to `1`,
-or we can evaluate the `Y` pump, `(\x.prefac(xx))(\x.prefac(xx))`, to
-produce another copy of `prefac`.  If we postpone evaluting the
-`isZero` test, we'll pump out copy after copy of `prefac`, and never
-realize that we've bottomed out in the recursion.  But if we adopt a
-leftmost/call by name/normal order evaluation strategy, we'll always
-start with the isZero predicate, and only produce a fresh copy of
-`prefac` if we are forced to. 
-
-Q.  You claimed that the Ackerman function couldn't be implemented
-using our primitive recursion techniques (such as the techniques that
-allow us to define addition and multiplication).  But you haven't
-shown that it is possible to define the Ackerman function using full
-recursion.
-
-A. OK:
-  
-<pre>
-A(m,n) =
-    | when m == 0 -> n + 1
-    | else when n == 0 -> A(m-1,1)
-    | else -> A(m-1, A(m,n-1))
-
-let A = Y (\A m n. isZero m (succ n) (isZero n (A (pred m) 1) (A (pred m) (A m (pred n))))) in
-</pre>
-
-For instance,
-
-    A 1 2
-    = A 0 (A 1 1)
-    = A 0 (A 0 (A 1 0))
-    = A 0 (A 0 (A 0 1))
-    = A 0 (A 0 2)
-    = A 0 3
-    = 4
-
-A 1 x is to A 0 x as addition is to the successor function;
-A 2 x is to A 1 x as multiplication is to addition;
-A 3 x is to A 2 x as exponentiation is to multiplication---
-so A 4 x is to A 3 x as super-exponentiation is to exponentiation...
+<pre><code>let succ = \n s z. s (n s z) in
+let X = (\x. succ (x x)) (\x. succ (x x)) in
+succ X 
+&equiv; succ ( (\x. succ (x x)) (\x. succ (x x)) ) 
+~~> succ (succ ( (\x. succ (x x)) (\x. succ (x x))))
+&equiv; succ (succ X)
+</code></pre>
+
+You should see the close similarity with `Y Y` here.
+