Merge branch 'master' of ssh://server.philosophy.fas.nyu.edu/Users/lambda/lambda
[lambda.git] / week11.mdwn
index 79543c8..0128a5d 100644 (file)
@@ -1,19 +1,11 @@
-[[!toc]]
+These notes may change in the next few days (today is 30 Nov 2010).
+The material here benefited from many discussions with Ken Shan.
 
 
-##List Zippers##
+##[[Tree and List Zippers]]##
 
 
-Say you've got some moderately-complex function for searching through a list, for example:
+##[[Coroutines and Aborts]]##
 
 
-       let find_nth (test : 'a -> bool) (n : int) (lst : 'a list) : (int * 'a) ->
-               let rec helper (position : int) n lst =
-                       match lst with
-                       | [] -> failwith "not found"
-                       | x :: xs when test x -> (if n = 1
-                               then (position, x)
-                               else helper (position + 1) (n - 1) xs
-                       )
-                       | x :: xs -> helper (position + 1) n xs
-               in helper 0 n lst;;
+##[[From Lists to Continuations]]##
 
 This searches for the `n`th element of a list that satisfies the predicate `test`, and returns a pair containing the position of that element, and the element itself. Good. But now what if you wanted to retrieve a different kind of information, such as the `n`th element matching `test`, together with its preceding and succeeding elements? In a real situation, you'd want to develop some good strategy for reporting when the target element doesn't have a predecessor and successor; but we'll just simplify here and report them as having some default value:
 
 
 This searches for the `n`th element of a list that satisfies the predicate `test`, and returns a pair containing the position of that element, and the element itself. Good. But now what if you wanted to retrieve a different kind of information, such as the `n`th element matching `test`, together with its preceding and succeeding elements? In a real situation, you'd want to develop some good strategy for reporting when the target element doesn't have a predecessor and successor; but we'll just simplify here and report them as having some default value:
 
@@ -111,7 +103,7 @@ The leftmost leaf and the rightmost leaf have the same label; but they are diffe
          /      \
         3        4
 
          /      \
         3        4
 
-Here I haven't drawn what the labels are. The leftmost leaf, the node tagged "3" in this diagram, doesn't have the label `3`. It has the label 1, as we said before. I just haven't put that into the diagram. The node tagged "2" doesn't have the label `2`. It doesn't have any label. The tree in this example only has labels on its leafs, not on any of its inner nodes.
+Here I haven't drawn what the labels are. The leftmost leaf, the node tagged "3" in this diagram, doesn't have the label `3`. It has the label 1, as we said before. I just haven't put that into the diagram. The node tagged "2" doesn't have the label `2`. It doesn't have any label. The tree in this example only has information labeling its leafs, not any of its inner nodes. The identity of its inner nodes is exhausted by their position in the tree.
 
 That is a second thing to note. In what follows, we'll only be working with *leaf-labeled* trees. In some uses of trees, one also wants labels on inner nodes. But we won't be discussing any such trees now. Our trees only have labels on their leafs. The diagrams below will tag all of the nodes, as in the second diagram above, and won't display what the leafs' labels are.
 
 
 That is a second thing to note. In what follows, we'll only be working with *leaf-labeled* trees. In some uses of trees, one also wants labels on inner nodes. But we won't be discussing any such trees now. Our trees only have labels on their leafs. The diagrams below will tag all of the nodes, as in the second diagram above, and won't display what the leafs' labels are.
 
@@ -134,21 +126,21 @@ This is a leaf-labeled tree whose labels aren't displayed. The `9200` and so on
 
 Suppose we want to represent that we're *at* the node marked `50`. We might use the following metalanguage notation to specify this:
 
 
 Suppose we want to represent that we're *at* the node marked `50`. We might use the following metalanguage notation to specify this:
 
-       {parent = ...; siblings = [node 20; *; node 80]}, * filled by node 50
+       {parent = ...; siblings = [subtree 20; *; subtree 80]}, * filled by subtree 50
 
 
-This is modeled on the notation suggested above for list zippers. Here `node 20` refers not to a `int` label associated with that node, but rather to the whole subtree rooted at that node:
+This is modeled on the notation suggested above for list zippers. Here `subtree 20` refers to the whole subtree rooted at node `20`:
 
          20
         / | \
        1  2  3
 
 
          20
         / | \
        1  2  3
 
-Similarly for `node 50` and `node 80`. We haven't said yet what goes in the `parent = ...` slot. Well, the parent of a subtree targetted on `node 50` should intuitively be a tree targetted on `node 500`:
+Similarly for `subtree 50` and `subtree 80`. We haven't said yet what goes in the `parent = ...` slot. Well, the parent of a subtree targetted on `node 50` should intuitively be a tree targetted on `node 500`:
 
 
-       {parent = ...; siblings = [*; node 920; node 950]}, * filled by node 500
+       {parent = ...; siblings = [*; subtree 920; subtree 950]}, * filled by subtree 500
 
 And the parent of that targetted subtree should intuitively be a tree targetted on `node 9200`:
 
 
 And the parent of that targetted subtree should intuitively be a tree targetted on `node 9200`:
 
-       {parent = None; siblings = [*]}, * filled by node 9200
+       {parent = None; siblings = [*]}, * filled by tree 9200
 
 This tree has no parents because it's the root of the base tree. Fully spelled out, then, our tree targetted on `node 50` would be:
 
 
 This tree has no parents because it's the root of the base tree. Fully spelled out, then, our tree targetted on `node 50` would be:
 
@@ -157,26 +149,13 @@ This tree has no parents because it's the root of the base tree. Fully spelled o
              parent = {
                 parent = None;
                 siblings = [*]
              parent = {
                 parent = None;
                 siblings = [*]
-             }, * filled by node 9200;
-             siblings = [*; node 920; node 950]
-          }, * filled by node 500;
-          siblings = [node 20; *; node 80]
-       }, * filled by node 50
-
-In fact, there's some redundancy in this structure, at the points where we have `* filled by node 9200` and `* filled by node 500`. Most of `node 9200`---with the exception of any label attached to node `9200` itself---is determined by the rest of this structure; and so too with `node 500`. So we could really work with:
-
-       {
-          parent = {
-             parent = {
-                parent = None;
-                siblings = [*]
-             }, label for * position (at node 9200);
-             siblings = [*; node 920; node 950]
-          }, label for * position (at node 500);
-          siblings = [node 20; *; node 80]
-       }, * filled by node 50
+             }, * filled by tree 9200;
+             siblings = [*; subtree 920; subtree 950]
+          }, * filled by subtree 500;
+          siblings = [subtree 20; *; subtree 80]
+       }, * filled by subtree 50
 
 
-Or, if we only had labels on the leafs of our tree:
+In fact, there's some redundancy in this structure, at the points where we have `* filled by tree 9200` and `* filled by subtree 500`. Since node 9200 doesn't have any label attached to it, the subtree rooted in it is determined by the rest of this structure; and so too with `subtree 500`. So we could really work with:
 
        {
           parent = {
 
        {
           parent = {
@@ -184,47 +163,46 @@ Or, if we only had labels on the leafs of our tree:
                 parent = None;
                 siblings = [*]
              },
                 parent = None;
                 siblings = [*]
              },
-             siblings = [*; node 920; node 950]
+             siblings = [*; subtree 920; subtree 950]
           },
           },
-          siblings = [node 20; *; node 80]
-       }, * filled by node 50
+          siblings = [subtree 20; *; subtree 80]
+       }, * filled by subtree 50
 
 
-We're understanding the `20` here in `node 20` to just be a metalanguage marker to help us theorists keep track of which node we're referring to. We're supposing the tree structure itself doesn't associate any informative labelling information with those nodes. It only associates informative labels with the tree leafs. (We haven't represented any such labels in our diagrams.)
 
 
-We still do need to keep track of what fills the outermost targetted position---`* filled by node 50`---because that contain a subtree of arbitrary complexity, that is not determined by the rest of this data structure.
+We still do need to keep track of what fills the outermost targetted position---`* filled by subtree 50`---because that contain a subtree of arbitrary complexity, that is not determined by the rest of this data structure.
 
 For simplicity, I'll continue to use the abbreviated form:
 
 
 For simplicity, I'll continue to use the abbreviated form:
 
-       {parent = ...; siblings = [node 20; *; node 80]}, * filled by node 50
+       {parent = ...; siblings = [subtree 20; *; subtree 80]}, * filled by subtree 50
 
 
-But that should be understood as standing for the more fully-spelled-out structure. Structures of this sort are called **tree zippers**, for a reason that will emerge. They should already seem intuitively similar to list zippers, though, at least in what we're using them to represent. I think it may initially be more helpful to call these **targetted trees**, though, and so will be switching back and forth between this different terms.
+But that should be understood as standing for the more fully-spelled-out structure. Structures of this sort are called **tree zippers**. They should already seem intuitively similar to list zippers, at least in what we're using them to represent. I think it may also be helpful to call them **targetted trees**, though, and so will be switching back and forth between these different terms.
 
 Moving left in our targetted tree that's targetted on `node 50` would be a matter of shifting the `*` leftwards:
 
 
 Moving left in our targetted tree that's targetted on `node 50` would be a matter of shifting the `*` leftwards:
 
-       {parent = ...; siblings = [*; node 50; node 80]}, * filled by node 20
+       {parent = ...; siblings = [*; subtree 50; subtree 80]}, * filled by subtree 20
 
 and similarly for moving right. If the sibling list is implemented as a list zipper, you should already know how to do that. If one were designing a tree zipper for a more restricted kind of tree, however, such as a binary tree, one would probably not represent siblings with a list zipper, but with something more special-purpose and economical.
 
 Moving downward in the tree would be a matter of constructing a tree targetted on some child of `node 20`, with the first part of the targetted tree above as its parent:
 
        {
 
 and similarly for moving right. If the sibling list is implemented as a list zipper, you should already know how to do that. If one were designing a tree zipper for a more restricted kind of tree, however, such as a binary tree, one would probably not represent siblings with a list zipper, but with something more special-purpose and economical.
 
 Moving downward in the tree would be a matter of constructing a tree targetted on some child of `node 20`, with the first part of the targetted tree above as its parent:
 
        {
-          parent = {parent = ...; siblings = [*; node 50; node 80]};
+          parent = {parent = ...; siblings = [*; subtree 50; subtree 80]};
           siblings = [*; leaf 2; leaf 3]
        }, * filled by leaf 1
 
           siblings = [*; leaf 2; leaf 3]
        }, * filled by leaf 1
 
-How would we move upward in a tree? Well, we'd build a regular, untargetted tree with a root node---let's call it `20`---and whose children are given by the outermost sibling list in the targetted tree above, after inserting the targetted subtree into the `*` position:
+How would we move upward in a tree? Well, we'd build a regular, untargetted tree with a root node---let's call it `20'`---and whose children are given by the outermost sibling list in the targetted tree above, after inserting the targetted subtree into the `*` position:
 
 
-              node 20
+              node 20'
            /     |    \
         /        |      \
        leaf 1  leaf 2  leaf 3
 
            /     |    \
         /        |      \
        leaf 1  leaf 2  leaf 3
 
-We'll call this new untargetted tree `node 20`. The result of moving upward from our previous targetted tree, targetted on `leaf 1`, would be the outermost `parent` element of that targetted tree, with `node 20` being the subtree that fills that parent's target position `*`:
+We'll call this new untargetted tree `subtree 20'`. The result of moving upward from our previous targetted tree, targetted on `leaf 1`, would be the outermost `parent` element of that targetted tree, with `subtree 20'` being the subtree that fills that parent's target position `*`:
 
        {
           parent = ...;
 
        {
           parent = ...;
-          siblings = [*; node 50; node 80]
-       }, * filled by node 20
+          siblings = [*; subtree 50; subtree 80]
+       }, * filled by subtree 20'
 
 Or, spelling that structure out fully:
 
 
 Or, spelling that structure out fully:
 
@@ -234,10 +212,10 @@ Or, spelling that structure out fully:
                 parent = None;
                 siblings = [*]
              },
                 parent = None;
                 siblings = [*]
              },
-             siblings = [*; node 920; node 950]
+             siblings = [*; subtree 920; subtree 950]
           },
           },
-          siblings = [*; node 50; node 80]
-       }, * filled by node 20
+          siblings = [*; subtree 50; subtree 80]
+       }, * filled by subtree 20'
 
 Moving upwards yet again would get us:
 
 
 Moving upwards yet again would get us:
 
@@ -246,15 +224,15 @@ Moving upwards yet again would get us:
              parent = None;
              siblings = [*]
           },
              parent = None;
              siblings = [*]
           },
-          siblings = [*; node 920; node 950]
-       }, * filled by node 500
+          siblings = [*; subtree 920; subtree 950]
+       }, * filled by subtree 500'
 
 
-where `node 500` refers to a tree built from a root node whose children are given by the list `[*; node 50; node 80]`, with `node 20` inserted into the `*` position. Moving upwards yet again would get us:
+where `subtree 500'` refers to a tree built from a root node whose children are given by the list `[*; subtree 50; subtree 80]`, with `subtree 20'` inserted into the `*` position. Moving upwards yet again would get us:
 
        {
           parent = None;
           siblings = [*]
 
        {
           parent = None;
           siblings = [*]
-       }, * filled by node 9200
+       }, * filled by tree 9200'
 
 where the targetted element is the root of our base tree. Like the "moving backward" operation for the list zipper, this "moving upward" operation is supposed to be reminiscent of closing a zipper, and that's why these data structures are called zippers.
 
 
 where the targetted element is the root of our base tree. Like the "moving backward" operation for the list zipper, this "moving upward" operation is supposed to be reminiscent of closing a zipper, and that's why these data structures are called zippers.
 
@@ -264,9 +242,10 @@ We haven't given you a real implementation of the tree zipper, but only a sugges
 *      Huet, Gerard. ["Functional Pearl: The Zipper"](http://www.st.cs.uni-sb.de/edu/seminare/2005/advanced-fp/docs/huet-zipper.pdf) Journal of Functional Programming 7 (5): 549-554, September 1997.
 *      As always, [Oleg](http://okmij.org/ftp/continuations/Continuations.html#zipper) takes this a few steps deeper.
 
 *      Huet, Gerard. ["Functional Pearl: The Zipper"](http://www.st.cs.uni-sb.de/edu/seminare/2005/advanced-fp/docs/huet-zipper.pdf) Journal of Functional Programming 7 (5): 549-554, September 1997.
 *      As always, [Oleg](http://okmij.org/ftp/continuations/Continuations.html#zipper) takes this a few steps deeper.
 
-##Same-fringe using a tree zipper##
 
 
-Recall back in [[Assignment4]], we asked you to enumerate the "fringe" of a leaf-labeled tree. Both of these trees:
+##Same-fringe using a zipper-based coroutine##
+
+Recall back in [[Assignment4]], we asked you to enumerate the "fringe" of a leaf-labeled tree. Both of these trees (here I *am* drawing the labels in the diagram):
 
            .                .
           / \              / \
 
            .                .
           / \              / \
@@ -274,7 +253,7 @@ Recall back in [[Assignment4]], we asked you to enumerate the "fringe" of a leaf
         / \                  / \
        1   2                2   3
 
         / \                  / \
        1   2                2   3
 
-have the same fringe: `[1;2;3]`. We also asked you to write a function that determined when two trees have the same fringe. The way you approached that back then was to enumerate each tree's fringe, and then compare the two lists for equality. Today, and then again in a later class, we'll encounter two new ways to approach the problem of determining when two trees have the same fringe.
+have the same fringe: `[1;2;3]`. We also asked you to write a function that determined when two trees have the same fringe. The way you approached that back then was to enumerate each tree's fringe, and then compare the two lists for equality. Today, and then again in a later class, we'll encounter new ways to approach the problem of determining when two trees have the same fringe.
 
 
 Supposing you did work out an implementation of the tree zipper, then one way to determine whether two trees have the same fringe would be: go downwards (and leftwards) in each tree as far as possible. Compare the targetted leaves. If they're different, stop because the trees have different fringes. If they're the same, then for each tree, move rightward if possible; if it's not (because you're at the rightmost position in a sibling list), more upwards then try again to move rightwards. Repeat until you are able to move rightwards. Once you do move rightwards, go downwards (and leftwards) as far as possible. Then you'll be targetted on the next leaf in the tree's fringe. The operations it takes to get to "the next leaf" may be different for the two trees. For example, in these trees:
 
 
 Supposing you did work out an implementation of the tree zipper, then one way to determine whether two trees have the same fringe would be: go downwards (and leftwards) in each tree as far as possible. Compare the targetted leaves. If they're different, stop because the trees have different fringes. If they're the same, then for each tree, move rightward if possible; if it's not (because you're at the rightmost position in a sibling list), more upwards then try again to move rightwards. Repeat until you are able to move rightwards. Once you do move rightwards, go downwards (and leftwards) as far as possible. Then you'll be targetted on the next leaf in the tree's fringe. The operations it takes to get to "the next leaf" may be different for the two trees. For example, in these trees:
@@ -338,20 +317,21 @@ Here is how you can extract the components of a labeled record:
 
 Anyway, using record types, we might define the tree zipper interface like so:
 
 
 Anyway, using record types, we might define the tree zipper interface like so:
 
-       type 'a starred_tree = Root | Starring_Left of 'a starred_pair | Starring_Right of 'a starred_pair
-       and 'a starred_pair = { parent : 'a starred_tree; sibling: 'a tree }
-       and 'a zipper = { tree : 'a starred_tree; filler: 'a tree };;
+       type 'a starred_level = Root | Starring_Left of 'a starred_nonroot | Starring_Right of 'a starred_nonroot
+       and 'a starred_nonroot = { parent : 'a starred_level; sibling: 'a tree };;
+
+       type 'a zipper = { level : 'a starred_level; filler: 'a tree };;
 
        let rec move_botleft (z : 'a zipper) : 'a zipper =
            (* returns z if the targetted node in z has no children *)
            (* else returns move_botleft (zipper which results from moving down and left in z) *)
 
 <!--
 
        let rec move_botleft (z : 'a zipper) : 'a zipper =
            (* returns z if the targetted node in z has no children *)
            (* else returns move_botleft (zipper which results from moving down and left in z) *)
 
 <!--
-           let {tree; filler} = z
+           let {level; filler} = z
            in match filler with
            | Leaf _ -> z
            | Node(left, right) ->
            in match filler with
            | Leaf _ -> z
            | Node(left, right) ->
-               let zdown = {tree = Starring_Left {parent = tree; sibling = right}; filler = left}
+               let zdown = {level = Starring_Left {parent = level; sibling = right}; filler = left}
                in move_botleft zdown
            ;;
 -->
                in move_botleft zdown
            ;;
 -->
@@ -362,12 +342,12 @@ Anyway, using record types, we might define the tree zipper interface like so:
            (* else returns move_right_or_up (result of moving up in z) *)
 
 <!--
            (* else returns move_right_or_up (result of moving up in z) *)
 
 <!--
-           let {tree; filler} = z
-           in match tree with
-           | Starring_Left {parent; sibling = right} -> Some {tree = Starring_Right {parent; sibling = filler}; filler = right}
+           let {level; filler} = z
+           in match level with
+           | Starring_Left {parent; sibling = right} -> Some {level = Starring_Right {parent; sibling = filler}; filler = right}
            | Root -> None
            | Starring_Right {parent; sibling = left} ->
            | Root -> None
            | Starring_Right {parent; sibling = left} ->
-               let z' = {tree = parent; filler = Node(left, filler)}
+               let z' = {level = parent; filler = Node(left, filler)}
                in move_right_or_up z'
            ;;
 -->
                in move_right_or_up z'
            ;;
 -->
@@ -375,22 +355,19 @@ Anyway, using record types, we might define the tree zipper interface like so:
 The following function takes an 'a tree and returns an 'a zipper focused on its root:
 
        let new_zipper (t : 'a tree) : 'a zipper =
 The following function takes an 'a tree and returns an 'a zipper focused on its root:
 
        let new_zipper (t : 'a tree) : 'a zipper =
-           {tree = Root; filler = t}
+           {level = Root; filler = t}
            ;;
 
 Finally, we can use a mutable reference cell to define a function that enumerates a tree's fringe until it's exhausted:
 
        let make_fringe_enumerator (t: 'a tree) =
            ;;
 
 Finally, we can use a mutable reference cell to define a function that enumerates a tree's fringe until it's exhausted:
 
        let make_fringe_enumerator (t: 'a tree) =
-           (* create a zipper targetting the root of t *)
-           let zstart = new_zipper t
-           in let zbotleft = move_botleft zstart
+           (* create a zipper targetting the botleft of t *)
+           let zbotleft = move_botleft (new_zipper t)
            (* create a refcell initially pointing to zbotleft *)
            in let zcell = ref (Some zbotleft)
            (* construct the next_leaf function *)
            in let next_leaf () : 'a option =
                match !zcell with
            (* create a refcell initially pointing to zbotleft *)
            in let zcell = ref (Some zbotleft)
            (* construct the next_leaf function *)
            in let next_leaf () : 'a option =
                match !zcell with
-               | None -> (* we've finished enumerating the fringe *)
-                   None
                | Some z -> (
                    (* extract label of currently-targetted leaf *)
                    let Leaf current = z.filler
                | Some z -> (
                    (* extract label of currently-targetted leaf *)
                    let Leaf current = z.filler
@@ -400,6 +377,8 @@ Finally, we can use a mutable reference cell to define a function that enumerate
                        | Some z' -> Some (move_botleft z')
                    (* return saved label *)
                    in Some current
                        | Some z' -> Some (move_botleft z')
                    (* return saved label *)
                    in Some current
+               | None -> (* we've finished enumerating the fringe *)
+                   None
                )
            (* return the next_leaf function *)
            in next_leaf
                )
            (* return the next_leaf function *)
            in next_leaf
@@ -473,6 +452,7 @@ If you want to read more about these kinds of threads, here are some links:
 
 <!-- * [[!wikipedia Computer_multitasking]]
 *      [[!wikipedia Thread_(computer_science)]] -->
 
 <!-- * [[!wikipedia Computer_multitasking]]
 *      [[!wikipedia Thread_(computer_science)]] -->
+
 *      [[!wikipedia Coroutine]]
 *      [[!wikipedia Iterator]]
 *      [[!wikipedia Generator_(computer_science)]]
 *      [[!wikipedia Coroutine]]
 *      [[!wikipedia Iterator]]
 *      [[!wikipedia Generator_(computer_science)]]
@@ -482,6 +462,221 @@ If you want to read more about these kinds of threads, here are some links:
 
 The way we built cooperative threads here crucially relied on two heavyweight tools. First, it relied on our having a data structure (the tree zipper) capable of being a static snapshot of where we left off in the tree whose fringe we're enumerating. Second, it relied on our using mutable reference cells so that we could update what the current snapshot (that is, tree zipper) was, so that the next invocation of the `next_leaf` function could start up again where the previous invocation left off.
 
 
 The way we built cooperative threads here crucially relied on two heavyweight tools. First, it relied on our having a data structure (the tree zipper) capable of being a static snapshot of where we left off in the tree whose fringe we're enumerating. Second, it relied on our using mutable reference cells so that we could update what the current snapshot (that is, tree zipper) was, so that the next invocation of the `next_leaf` function could start up again where the previous invocation left off.
 
+It's possible to build cooperative threads without using those tools, however. Some languages have a native syntax for them. Here's how we'd write the same-fringe solution above using native coroutines in the language Lua:
+
+       > function fringe_enumerator (tree)
+           if tree.leaf then
+               coroutine.yield (tree.leaf)
+           else
+               fringe_enumerator (tree.left)
+               fringe_enumerator (tree.right)
+           end
+       end
+       
+       > function same_fringe (tree1, tree2)
+           local next1 = coroutine.wrap (fringe_enumerator)
+           local next2 = coroutine.wrap (fringe_enumerator)
+           local function loop (leaf1, leaf2)
+               if leaf1 or leaf2 then
+                   return leaf1 == leaf2 and loop( next1(), next2() )
+               elseif not leaf1 and not leaf2 then
+                   return true
+               else
+                   return false
+               end
+           end
+           return loop (next1(tree1), next2(tree2))
+       end
+       
+       > return same_fringe ( {leaf=1}, {leaf=2})
+       false
+       
+       > return same_fringe ( {leaf=1}, {leaf=1})
+       true
+       
+       > return same_fringe ( {left = {leaf=1}, right = {left = {leaf=2}, right = {leaf=3}}},
+           {left = {left = {leaf=1}, right = {leaf=2}}, right = {leaf=3}} )
+       true
+
+We're going to think about the underlying principles to this execution pattern, and instead learn how to implement it from scratch---without necessarily having zippers to rely on.
+
+
+##Exceptions and Aborts##
+
+To get a better understanding of how that execution patter works, we'll add yet a second execution pattern to our plate, and then think about what they have in common.
+
+While writing OCaml code, you've probably come across errors. In fact, you've probably come across errors of two sorts. One sort of error comes about when you've got syntax errors or type errors and the OCaml interpreter isn't even able to understand your code:
+
+       # let lst = [1; 2] in
+         "a" :: lst;;
+       Error: This expression has type int list
+                  but an expression was expected of type string list
+
+But you may also have encountered other kinds of error, that arise while your program is running. For example:
+
+       # 1/0;;
+       Exception: Division_by_zero.
+       # List.nth [1;2] 10;;
+       Exception: Failure "nth".
+
+These "Exceptions" are **run-time errors**. OCaml will automatically detect some of them, like when you attempt to divide by zero. Other exceptions are *raised* by code. For instance, here is the implementation of `List.nth`:
+
+       let nth l n =
+         if n < 0 then invalid_arg "List.nth" else
+         let rec nth_aux l n =
+               match l with
+               | [] -> failwith "nth"
+               | a::l -> if n = 0 then a else nth_aux l (n-1)
+         in nth_aux l n
+
+Notice the two clauses `invalid_arg "List.nth"` and `failwith "nth"`. These are two helper functions which are shorthand for:
+
+       raise (Invalid_argument "List.nth");;
+       raise (Failure "nth");;
+
+where `Invalid_argument "List.nth"` is a value of type `exn`, and so too `Failure "nth"`. When you have some value `ex` of type `exn` and evaluate the expression:
+
+       raise ex
+
+the effect is for the program to immediately stop without evaluating any further code:
+
+       # let xcell = ref 0;;
+       val xcell : int ref = {contents = 0}
+       # let ex = Failure "test"
+         in let _ = raise ex
+         in xcell := 1;;
+       Exception: Failure "test".
+       # !xcell;;
+       - : int = 0
+
+Notice that the line `xcell := 1` was never evaluated, so the contents of `xcell` are still `0`.
+
+I said when you evaluate the expression:
+
+       raise ex
+
+the effect is for the program to immediately stop. That's not exactly true. You can also programmatically arrange to *catch* errors, without the program necessarily stopping. In OCaml we do that with a `try ... with PATTERN -> ...` construct, analogous to the `match ... with PATTERN -> ...` construct:
+
+       # let foo x =
+           try
+               if x = 1 then 10
+               else if x = 2 then raise (Failure "two")
+               else raise (Failure "three")
+           with Failure "two" -> 20
+           ;;
+       val foo : int -> int = <fun>
+       # foo 1;;
+       - : int = 10
+       # foo 2;;
+       - : int = 20
+       # foo 3;;
+       Exception: Failure "three".
+
+Notice what happens here. If we call `foo 1`, then the code between `try` and `with` evaluates to `10`, with no exceptions being raised. That then is what the entire `try ... with ...` block evaluates to; and so too what `foo 1` evaluates to. If we call `foo 2`, then the code between `try` and `with` raises an exception `Failure "two"`. The pattern in the `with` clause matches that exception, so we get instead `20`. If we call `foo 3`, we again raise an exception. This exception isn't matched by the `with` block, so it percolates up to the top of the program, and then the program immediately stops.
+
+So what I should have said is that when you evaluate the expression:
+
+       raise ex
+
+*and that exception is never caught*, then the effect is for the program to immediately stop.
+
+Of course, it's possible to handle errors in other ways too. There's no reason why the implementation of `List.nth` *had* to do things this way. They might instead have returned `Some a` when the list had an nth member `a`, and `None` when it does not. But it's pedagogically useful for us to think about this pattern now.
+
+When an exception is raised, it percolates up through the code that called it, until it finds a surrounding `try ... with ...` that matches it. That might not be the first `try ... with ...` that it encounters. For example:
+
+       # try
+           try
+               raise (Failure "blah")
+           with Failure "fooey" -> 10
+         with Failure "blah" -> 20;;
+       - : int = 20
+
+The matching `try ... with ...` block need not *lexically surround* the site where the error was raised:
+
+       # let foo b x =
+           try
+               b x
+           with Failure "blah" -> 20
+       in let bar x =
+           raise (Failure "blah")
+       in foo bar 0;;
+       - : int = 20
+
+Here we call `foo bar 0`, and `foo` in turn calls `bar 0`, and `bar` raises the exception. Since there's no matching `try ... with ...` block in `bar`, we percolate back up the history of *who called this function?* and find a matching `try ... with ...` block in `foo`. This catches the error and so then the `try ... with ...` block in `foo` that called `bar` in the first place will evaluate to `20`.
+
+OK, now this exception-handling apparatus does exemplify the second execution pattern we want to focus on. But it may bring it into clearer focus if we simplify the pattern even more. Imagine we could write code like this instead:
+
+       # let foo x =
+           try
+               (if x = 1 then 10
+               else abort 20) + 1
+           end
+           ;;
+
+then if we called `foo 1`, we'd get the result `11`. If we called `foo 2`, on the other hand, we'd get `20` (note, not `21`). This exemplifies the same interesting "jump out of this part of the code" behavior that the `try ... raise ... with ...` code does, but without the details of matching which exception was raised, and handling the exception to produce a new result.
+
+Many programming languages have this simplified exceution pattern, either instead of or alongside a `try ... with ...`-like pattern. In Lua and many other languages, `abort` is instead called `return`. The preceding example would be written:
+
+       > function foo(x)
+           local value
+           if (x == 1) then
+               value = 10
+           else
+               return 20
+           end
+           return value + 1
+       end
+       
+       > return foo(1)
+       11
+       
+       > return foo(2)
+       20
+
+Okay, so that's our second execution pattern.
+
+##What do these have in common?##
+
+In both of these patterns, we need to have some way to take a snapshot of where we are in the evaluation of a complex piece of code, so that we might later resume execution at that point. In the coroutine example, the two threads need to have a snapshot of where they were in the enumeration of their tree's leaves. In the abort example, we need to have a snapshot of where to pick up again if some embedded piece of code aborts. Sometimes we might distill that snapshot into a datastructure like a zipper. But we might not always know how to do so; and learning how to think about these snapshots without the help of zippers will help us see patterns and similarities we might otherwise miss.
+
+A more general way to think about these snapshots is to think of the code we're taking a snapshot of as a *function.* For example, in this code:
+
+       let foo x =
+           try
+               (if x = 1 then 10
+               else abort 20) + 1
+           end
+       in (foo 2) + 1;;
+
+we can imagine a box:
+
+       let foo x =
+       +---------------------------+
+       |   try                     |
+       |       (if x = 1 then 10   |
+       |       else abort 20) + 1  |
+       |   end                     |
+       +---------------------------+
+       in (foo 2) + 1;;
+
+and as we're about to enter the box, we want to take a snapshot of the code *outside* the box. If we decide to abort, we'd be aborting to that snapshotted code.
+
+<!--
+# #require "delimcc";;
+# open Delimcc;;
+# let reset body = let p = new_prompt () in push_prompt p (body p);;
+val reset : ('a Delimcc.prompt -> unit -> 'a) -> 'a = <fun>
+# let foo x = reset(fun p () -> (shift p (fun k -> if x = 1 then k 10 else 20)) + 1) in (foo 1) + 100;;
+- : int = 111
+# let foo x = reset(fun p () -> (shift p (fun k -> if x = 1 then k 10 else 20)) + 1) in (foo 2) + 100;;
+- : int = 120
+-->
+
+
+
+
+--------------------------------------
+
 In coming weeks, we'll learn about a different way to create threads, that relies on **continuations** rather than on those two tools. All of these tools are inter-related. As Oleg says, "Zipper can be viewed as a delimited continuation reified as a data structure." These different tools are also inter-related with monads. Many of these tools can be used to define the others. We'll explore some of the connections between them in the remaining weeks, but we encourage you to explore more.
 
 
 In coming weeks, we'll learn about a different way to create threads, that relies on **continuations** rather than on those two tools. All of these tools are inter-related. As Oleg says, "Zipper can be viewed as a delimited continuation reified as a data structure." These different tools are also inter-related with monads. Many of these tools can be used to define the others. We'll explore some of the connections between them in the remaining weeks, but we encourage you to explore more.
 
 
@@ -553,3 +748,1008 @@ So now, guess what would be the result of doing the following:
 <!-- (1, 7) ... explain why not (1, 8) -->
 
 
 <!-- (1, 7) ... explain why not (1, 8) -->
 
 
+Refunctionalizing zippers: from lists to continuations
+------------------------------------------------------
+
+If zippers are continuations reified (defuntionalized), then one route
+to continuations is to re-functionalize a zipper.  Then the
+concreteness and understandability of the zipper provides a way of
+understanding and equivalent treatment using continuations.
+
+Let's work with lists of chars for a change.  To maximize readability, we'll
+indulge in an abbreviatory convention that "abSd" abbreviates the
+list `['a'; 'b'; 'S'; 'd']`.
+
+We will set out to compute a deceptively simple-seeming **task: given a
+string, replace each occurrence of 'S' in that string with a copy of
+the string up to that point.**
+
+We'll define a function `t` (for "task") that maps strings to their
+updated version.
+
+Expected behavior:
+
+<pre>
+t "abSd" ~~> "ababd"
+</pre>   
+
+
+In linguistic terms, this is a kind of anaphora
+resolution, where `'S'` is functioning like an anaphoric element, and
+the preceding string portion is the antecedent.
+
+This deceptively simple task gives rise to some mind-bending complexity.
+Note that it matters which 'S' you target first (the position of the *
+indicates the targeted 'S'):
+
+<pre>
+    t "aSbS" 
+        *
+~~> t "aabS" 
+          *
+~~> "aabaab"
+</pre>
+
+versus
+
+<pre>
+    t "aSbS"
+          *
+~~> t "aSbaSb" 
+        *
+~~> t "aabaSb"
+           *
+~~> "aabaaabab"
+</pre>   
+
+versus
+
+<pre>
+    t "aSbS"
+          *
+~~> t "aSbaSb"
+           *
+~~> t "aSbaaSbab"
+            *
+~~> t "aSbaaaSbaabab"
+             *
+~~> ...
+</pre>
+
+Aparently, this task, as simple as it is, is a form of computation,
+and the order in which the `'S'`s get evaluated can lead to divergent
+behavior.
+
+For now, we'll agree to always evaluate the leftmost `'S'`, which
+guarantees termination, and a final string without any `'S'` in it.
+
+This is a task well-suited to using a zipper.  We'll define a function
+`tz` (for task with zippers), which accomplishes the task by mapping a
+char list zipper to a char list.  We'll call the two parts of the
+zipper `unzipped` and `zipped`; we start with a fully zipped list, and
+move elements to the zipped part by pulling the zipped down until the
+entire list has been unzipped (and so the zipped half of the zipper is empty).
+
+<pre>
+type 'a list_zipper = ('a list) * ('a list);;
+
+let rec tz (z:char list_zipper) = 
+    match z with (unzipped, []) -> List.rev(unzipped) (* Done! *)
+               | (unzipped, 'S'::zipped) -> tz ((List.append unzipped unzipped), zipped) 
+               | (unzipped, target::zipped) -> tz (target::unzipped, zipped);; (* Pull zipper *)
+
+# tz ([], ['a'; 'b'; 'S'; 'd']);;
+- : char list = ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']
+
+# tz ([], ['a'; 'S'; 'b'; 'S']);;
+- : char list = ['a'; 'a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'a'; 'b']
+</pre>
+
+Note that this implementation enforces the evaluate-leftmost rule.
+Task completed.
+
+One way to see exactly what is going on is to watch the zipper in
+action by tracing the execution of `tz`.  By using the `#trace`
+directive in the Ocaml interpreter, the system will print out the
+arguments to `tz` each time it is (recurcively) called.  Note that the
+lines with left-facing arrows (`<--`) show (recursive) calls to `tz`,
+giving the value of its argument (a zipper), and the lines with
+right-facing arrows (`-->`) show the output of each recursive call, a
+simple list.  
+
+<pre>
+# #trace tz;;
+t1 is now traced.
+# tz ([], ['a'; 'b'; 'S'; 'd']);;
+tz <-- ([], ['a'; 'b'; 'S'; 'd'])
+tz <-- (['a'], ['b'; 'S'; 'd'])         (* Pull zipper *)
+tz <-- (['b'; 'a'], ['S'; 'd'])         (* Pull zipper *)
+tz <-- (['b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'a'], ['d'])    (* Special step *)
+tz <-- (['d'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'a'], [])  (* Pull zipper *)
+tz --> ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']        (* Output reversed *)
+tz --> ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']
+tz --> ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']
+tz --> ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']
+tz --> ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']
+- : char list = ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd'] 
+</pre>
+
+The nice thing about computations involving lists is that it's so easy
+to visualize them as a data structure.  Eventually, we want to get to
+a place where we can talk about more abstract computations.  In order
+to get there, we'll first do the exact same thing we just did with
+concrete zipper using procedures.  
+
+Think of a list as a procedural recipe: `['a'; 'b'; 'S'; 'd']` 
+is the result of the computation `a::(b::(S::(d::[])))` (or, in our old
+style, `makelist a (makelist b (makelist S (makelist c empty)))`).
+The recipe for constructing the list goes like this:
+
+<pre>
+(0)  Start with the empty list []
+(1)  make a new list whose first element is 'd' and whose tail is the list constructed in step (0)
+(2)  make a new list whose first element is 'S' and whose tail is the list constructed in step (1)
+-----------------------------------------
+(3)  make a new list whose first element is 'b' and whose tail is the list constructed in step (2)
+(4)  make a new list whose first element is 'a' and whose tail is the list constructed in step (3)
+</pre>
+
+What is the type of each of these steps?  Well, it will be a function
+from the result of the previous step (a list) to a new list: it will
+be a function of type `char list -> char list`.  We'll call each step
+(or group of steps) a **continuation** of the recipe.  So in this
+context, a continuation is a function of type `char list -> char
+list`.  For instance, the continuation corresponding to the portion of
+the recipe below the horizontal line is the function `fun (tail:char
+list) -> a::(b::tail)`.
+
+This means that we can now represent the unzipped part of our
+zipper--the part we've already unzipped--as a continuation: a function
+describing how to finish building the list.  We'll write a new
+function, `tc` (for task with continuations), that will take an input
+list (not a zipper!) and a continuation and return a processed list.
+The structure and the behavior will follow that of `tz` above, with
+some small but interesting differences.  We've included the orginal
+`tz` to facilitate detailed comparison:
+
+<pre>
+let rec tz (z:char list_zipper) = 
+    match z with (unzipped, []) -> List.rev(unzipped) (* Done! *)
+               | (unzipped, 'S'::zipped) -> tz ((List.append unzipped unzipped), zipped) 
+               | (unzipped, target::zipped) -> tz (target::unzipped, zipped);; (* Pull zipper *)
+
+let rec tc (l: char list) (c: (char list) -> (char list)) =
+  match l with [] -> List.rev (c [])
+             | 'S'::zipped -> tc zipped (fun x -> c (c x))
+             | target::zipped -> tc zipped (fun x -> target::(c x));;
+
+# tc ['a'; 'b'; 'S'; 'd'] (fun x -> x);;
+- : char list = ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b']
+
+# tc ['a'; 'S'; 'b'; 'S'] (fun x -> x);;
+- : char list = ['a'; 'a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'a'; 'b']
+</pre>
+
+To emphasize the parallel, I've re-used the names `zipped` and
+`target`.  The trace of the procedure will show that these variables
+take on the same values in the same series of steps as they did during
+the execution of `tz` above.  There will once again be one initial and
+four recursive calls to `tc`, and `zipped` will take on the values
+`"bSd"`, `"Sd"`, `"d"`, and `""` (and, once again, on the final call,
+the first `match` clause will fire, so the the variable `zipper` will
+not be instantiated).
+
+I have not called the functional argument `unzipped`, although that is
+what the parallel would suggest.  The reason is that `unzipped` is a
+list, but `c` is a function.  That's the most crucial difference, the
+point of the excercise, and it should be emphasized.  For instance,
+you can see this difference in the fact that in `tz`, we have to glue
+together the two instances of `unzipped` with an explicit (and
+relatively inefficient) `List.append`.
+In the `tc` version of the task, we simply compose `c` with itself: 
+`c o c = fun x -> c (c x)`.
+
+Why use the identity function as the initial continuation?  Well, if
+you have already constructed the initial list `"abSd"`, what's the next
+step in the recipe to produce the desired result, i.e, the very same
+list, `"abSd"`?  Clearly, the identity continuation.
+
+A good way to test your understanding is to figure out what the
+continuation function `c` must be at the point in the computation when
+`tc` is called with the first argument `"Sd"`.  Two choices: is it
+`fun x -> a::b::x`, or it is `fun x -> b::a::x`?  The way to see if
+you're right is to execute the following command and see what happens:
+
+    tc ['S'; 'd'] (fun x -> 'a'::'b'::x);;
+
+There are a number of interesting directions we can go with this task.
+The reason this task was chosen is because it can be viewed as a
+simplified picture of a computation using continuations, where `'S'`
+plays the role of a control operator with some similarities to what is
+often called `shift`.  In the analogy, the input list portrays a
+sequence of functional applications, where `[f1; f2; f3; x]` represents
+`f1(f2(f3 x))`.  The limitation of the analogy is that it is only
+possible to represent computations in which the applications are
+always right-branching, i.e., the computation `((f1 f2) f3) x` cannot
+be directly represented.
+
+One possibile development is that we could add a special symbol `'#'`,
+and then the task would be to copy from the target `'S'` only back to
+the closest `'#'`.  This would allow the task to simulate delimited
+continuations with embedded prompts.
+
+The reason the task is well-suited to the list zipper is in part
+because the list monad has an intimate connection with continuations.
+The following section explores this connection.  We'll return to the
+list task after talking about generalized quantifiers below.
+
+
+Rethinking the list monad
+-------------------------
+
+To construct a monad, the key element is to settle on a type
+constructor, and the monad more or less naturally follows from that.
+We'll remind you of some examples of how monads follow from the type
+constructor in a moment.  This will involve some review of familair
+material, but it's worth doing for two reasons: it will set up a
+pattern for the new discussion further below, and it will tie together
+some previously unconnected elements of the course (more specifically,
+version 3 lists and monads).
+
+For instance, take the **Reader Monad**.  Once we decide that the type
+constructor is
+
+    type 'a reader = env -> 'a
+
+then the choice of unit and bind is natural:
+
+    let r_unit (a : 'a) : 'a reader = fun (e : env) -> a
+
+The reason this is a fairly natural choice is that because the type of
+an `'a reader` is `env -> 'a` (by definition), the type of the
+`r_unit` function is `'a -> env -> 'a`, which is an instance of the
+type of the *K* combinator.  So it makes sense that *K* is the unit
+for the reader monad.
+
+Since the type of the `bind` operator is required to be
+
+    r_bind : ('a reader) -> ('a -> 'b reader) -> ('b reader)
+
+We can reason our way to the traditional reader `bind` function as
+follows. We start by declaring the types determined by the definition
+of a bind operation:
+
+    let r_bind (u : 'a reader) (f : 'a -> 'b reader) : ('b reader) = ...
+
+Now we have to open up the `u` box and get out the `'a` object in order to
+feed it to `f`.  Since `u` is a function from environments to
+objects of type `'a`, the way we open a box in this monad is
+by applying it to an environment:
+
+<pre>
+       ... f (u e) ...
+</pre>
+
+This subexpression types to `'b reader`, which is good.  The only
+problem is that we made use of an environment `e` that we didn't already have,
+so we must abstract over that variable to balance the books:
+
+       fun e -> f (u e) ...
+
+[To preview the discussion of the Curry-Howard correspondence, what
+we're doing here is constructing an intuitionistic proof of the type,
+and using the Curry-Howard labeling of the proof as our bind term.]
+
+This types to `env -> 'b reader`, but we want to end up with `env ->
+'b`.  Once again, the easiest way to turn a `'b reader` into a `'b` is to apply it to an environment.  So we end up as follows:
+
+<pre>
+r_bind (u : 'a reader) (f : 'a -> 'b reader) : ('b reader) = f (u e) e         
+</pre>
+
+And we're done. This gives us a bind function of the right type. We can then check whether, in combination with the unit function we chose, it satisfies the monad laws, and behaves in the way we intend. And it does.
+
+[The bind we cite here is a condensed version of the careful `let a = u e in ...`
+constructions we provided in earlier lectures.  We use the condensed
+version here in order to emphasize similarities of structure across
+monads.]
+
+The **State Monad** is similar.  Once we've decided to use the following type constructor:
+
+    type 'a state = store -> ('a, store)
+
+Then our unit is naturally:
+
+    let s_unit (a : 'a) : ('a state) = fun (s : store) -> (a, s)
+
+And we can reason our way to the bind function in a way similar to the reasoning given above. First, we need to apply `f` to the contents of the `u` box:
+
+    let s_bind (u : 'a state) (f : 'a -> 'b state) : 'b state = 
+               ... f (...) ...
+
+But unlocking the `u` box is a little more complicated.  As before, we
+need to posit a state `s` that we can apply `u` to.  Once we do so,
+however, we won't have an `'a`, we'll have a pair whose first element
+is an `'a`.  So we have to unpack the pair:
+
+       ... let (a, s') = u s in ... (f a) ...
+
+Abstracting over the `s` and adjusting the types gives the result:
+
+       let s_bind (u : 'a state) (f : 'a -> 'b state) : 'b state = 
+               fun (s : store) -> let (a, s') = u s in f a s'
+
+The **Option/Maybe Monad** doesn't follow the same pattern so closely, so we
+won't pause to explore it here, though conceptually its unit and bind
+follow just as naturally from its type constructor.
+
+Our other familiar monad is the **List Monad**, which we were told
+looks like this:
+
+    type 'a list = ['a];;
+    l_unit (a : 'a) = [a];;
+    l_bind u f = List.concat (List.map f u);;
+
+Thinking through the list monad will take a little time, but doing so
+will provide a connection with continuations.
+
+Recall that `List.map` takes a function and a list and returns the
+result to applying the function to the elements of the list:
+
+    List.map (fun i -> [i;i+1]) [1;2] ~~> [[1; 2]; [2; 3]]
+
+and List.concat takes a list of lists and erases the embdded list
+boundaries:
+
+    List.concat [[1; 2]; [2; 3]] ~~> [1; 2; 2; 3]
+
+And sure enough, 
+
+    l_bind [1;2] (fun i -> [i, i+1]) ~~> [1; 2; 2; 3]
+
+Now, why this unit, and why this bind?  Well, ideally a unit should
+not throw away information, so we can rule out `fun x -> []` as an
+ideal unit.  And units should not add more information than required,
+so there's no obvious reason to prefer `fun x -> [x,x]`.  In other
+words, `fun x -> [x]` is a reasonable choice for a unit.
+
+As for bind, an `'a list` monadic object contains a lot of objects of
+type `'a`, and we want to make use of each of them (rather than
+arbitrarily throwing some of them away).  The only
+thing we know for sure we can do with an object of type `'a` is apply
+the function of type `'a -> 'a list` to them.  Once we've done so, we
+have a collection of lists, one for each of the `'a`'s.  One
+possibility is that we could gather them all up in a list, so that
+`bind' [1;2] (fun i -> [i;i]) ~~> [[1;1];[2;2]]`.  But that restricts
+the object returned by the second argument of `bind` to always be of
+type `'b list list`.  We can elimiate that restriction by flattening
+the list of lists into a single list: this is
+just List.concat applied to the output of List.map.  So there is some logic to the
+choice of unit and bind for the list monad.  
+
+Yet we can still desire to go deeper, and see if the appropriate bind
+behavior emerges from the types, as it did for the previously
+considered monads.  But we can't do that if we leave the list type as
+a primitive Ocaml type.  However, we know several ways of implementing
+lists using just functions.  In what follows, we're going to use type
+3 lists, the right fold implementation (though it's important and
+intriguing to wonder how things would change if we used some other
+strategy for implementating lists).  These were the lists that made
+lists look like Church numerals with extra bits embdded in them:
+
+    empty list:                fun f z -> z
+    list with one element:     fun f z -> f 1 z
+    list with two elements:    fun f z -> f 2 (f 1 z)
+    list with three elements:  fun f z -> f 3 (f 2 (f 1 z))
+
+and so on.  To save time, we'll let the OCaml interpreter infer the
+principle types of these functions (rather than inferring what the
+types should be ourselves):
+
+       # fun f z -> z;;
+       - : 'a -> 'b -> 'b = <fun>
+       # fun f z -> f 1 z;;
+       - : (int -> 'a -> 'b) -> 'a -> 'b = <fun>
+       # fun f z -> f 2 (f 1 z);;
+       - : (int -> 'a -> 'a) -> 'a -> 'a = <fun>
+       # fun f z -> f 3 (f 2 (f 1 z))
+       - : (int -> 'a -> 'a) -> 'a -> 'a = <fun>
+
+We can see what the consistent, general principle types are at the end, so we
+can stop. These types should remind you of the simply-typed lambda calculus
+types for Church numerals (`(o -> o) -> o -> o`) with one extra type
+thrown in, the type of the element a the head of the list
+(in this case, an int).
+
+So here's our type constructor for our hand-rolled lists:
+
+    type 'b list' = (int -> 'b -> 'b) -> 'b -> 'b
+
+Generalizing to lists that contain any kind of element (not just
+ints), we have
+
+    type ('a, 'b) list' = ('a -> 'b -> 'b) -> 'b -> 'b
+
+So an `('a, 'b) list'` is a list containing elements of type `'a`,
+where `'b` is the type of some part of the plumbing.  This is more
+general than an ordinary OCaml list, but we'll see how to map them
+into OCaml lists soon.  We don't need to fully grasp the role of the `'b`'s
+in order to proceed to build a monad:
+
+    l'_unit (a : 'a) : ('a, 'b) list = fun a -> fun f z -> f a z
+
+No problem.  Arriving at bind is a little more complicated, but
+exactly the same principles apply, you just have to be careful and
+systematic about it.
+
+    l'_bind (u : ('a,'b) list') (f : 'a -> ('c, 'd) list') : ('c, 'd) list'  = ...
+
+Unpacking the types gives:
+
+    l'_bind (u : ('a -> 'b -> 'b) -> 'b -> 'b)
+            (f : 'a -> ('c -> 'd -> 'd) -> 'd -> 'd)
+            : ('c -> 'd -> 'd) -> 'd -> 'd = ...
+
+Perhaps a bit intimiating.
+But it's a rookie mistake to quail before complicated types. You should
+be no more intimiated by complex types than by a linguistic tree with
+deeply embedded branches: complex structure created by repeated
+application of simple rules.
+
+[This would be a good time to try to build your own term for the types
+just given.  Doing so (or attempting to do so) will make the next
+paragraph much easier to follow.]
+
+As usual, we need to unpack the `u` box.  Examine the type of `u`.
+This time, `u` will only deliver up its contents if we give `u` an
+argument that is a function expecting an `'a` and a `'b`. `u` will 
+fold that function over its type `'a` members, and that's how we'll get the `'a`s we need. Thus:
+
+       ... u (fun (a : 'a) (b : 'b) -> ... f a ... ) ...
+
+In order for `u` to have the kind of argument it needs, the `... (f a) ...` has to evaluate to a result of type `'b`. The easiest way to do this is to collapse (or "unify") the types `'b` and `'d`, with the result that `f a` will have type `('c -> 'b -> 'b) -> 'b -> 'b`. Let's postulate an argument `k` of type `('c -> 'b -> 'b)` and supply it to `(f a)`:
+
+       ... u (fun (a : 'a) (b : 'b) -> ... f a k ... ) ...
+
+Now we have an argument `b` of type `'b`, so we can supply that to `(f a) k`, getting a result of type `'b`, as we need:
+
+       ... u (fun (a : 'a) (b : 'b) -> f a k b) ...
+
+Now, we've used a `k` that we pulled out of nowhere, so we need to abstract over it:
+
+       fun (k : 'c -> 'b -> 'b) -> u (fun (a : 'a) (b : 'b) -> f a k b)
+
+This whole expression has type `('c -> 'b -> 'b) -> 'b -> 'b`, which is exactly the type of a `('c, 'b) list'`. So we can hypothesize that our bind is:
+
+    l'_bind (u : ('a -> 'b -> 'b) -> 'b -> 'b)
+            (f : 'a -> ('c -> 'b -> 'b) -> 'b -> 'b)
+            : ('c -> 'b -> 'b) -> 'b -> 'b = 
+      fun k -> u (fun a b -> f a k b)
+
+That is a function of the right type for our bind, but to check whether it works, we have to verify it (with the unit we chose) against the monad laws, and reason whether it will have the right behavior.
+
+Here's a way to persuade yourself that it will have the right behavior. First, it will be handy to eta-expand our `fun k -> u (fun a b -> f a k b)` to:
+
+      fun k z -> u (fun a b -> f a k b) z
+
+Now let's think about what this does. It's a wrapper around `u`. In order to behave as the list which is the result of mapping `f` over each element of `u`, and then joining (`concat`ing) the results, this wrapper would have to accept arguments `k` and `z` and fold them in just the same way that the list which is the result of mapping `f` and then joining the results would fold them. Will it?
+
+Suppose we have a list' whose contents are `[1; 2; 4; 8]`---that is, our list' will be `fun f z -> f 1 (f 2 (f 4 (f 8 z)))`. We call that list' `u`. Suppose we also have a function `f` that for each `int` we give it, gives back a list of the divisors of that `int` that are greater than 1. Intuitively, then, binding `u` to `f` should give us:
+
+       concat (map f u) =
+       concat [[]; [2]; [2; 4]; [2; 4; 8]] =
+       [2; 2; 4; 2; 4; 8]
+
+Or rather, it should give us a list' version of that, which takes a function `k` and value `z` as arguments, and returns the right fold of `k` and `z` over those elements. What does our formula
+
+      fun k z -> u (fun a b -> f a k b) z
+       
+do? Well, for each element `a` in `u`, it applies `f` to that `a`, getting one of the lists:
+
+       []
+       [2]
+       [2; 4]
+       [2; 4; 8]
+
+(or rather, their list' versions). Then it takes the accumulated result `b` of previous steps in the fold, and it folds `k` and `b` over the list generated by `f a`. The result of doing so is passed on to the next step as the accumulated result so far.
+
+So if, for example, we let `k` be `+` and `z` be `0`, then the computation would proceed:
+
+       0 ==>
+       right-fold + and 0 over [2; 4; 8] = 2+4+8+0 ==>
+       right-fold + and 2+4+8+0 over [2; 4] = 2+4+2+4+8+0 ==>
+       right-fold + and 2+4+2+4+8+0 over [2] = 2+2+4+2+4+8+0 ==>
+       right-fold + and 2+2+4+2+4+8+0 over [] = 2+2+4+2+4+8+0
+
+which indeed is the result of right-folding + and 0 over `[2; 2; 4; 2; 4; 8]`. If you trace through how this works, you should be able to persuade yourself that our formula:
+
+      fun k z -> u (fun a b -> f a k b) z
+
+will deliver just the same folds, for arbitrary choices of `k` and `z` (with the right types), and arbitrary list's `u` and appropriately-typed `f`s, as
+
+       fun k z -> List.fold_right k (concat (map f u)) z
+
+would.
+
+For future reference, we might make two eta-reductions to our formula, so that we have instead:
+
+      let l'_bind = fun k -> u (fun a -> f a k);;
+
+Let's make some more tests:
+
+
+    l_bind [1;2] (fun i -> [i, i+1]) ~~> [1; 2; 2; 3]
+
+    l'_bind (fun f z -> f 1 (f 2 z)) 
+            (fun i -> fun f z -> f i (f (i+1) z)) ~~> <fun>
+
+Sigh.  OCaml won't show us our own list.  So we have to choose an `f`
+and a `z` that will turn our hand-crafted lists into standard OCaml
+lists, so that they will print out.
+
+       # let cons h t = h :: t;;  (* OCaml is stupid about :: *)
+       # l'_bind (fun f z -> f 1 (f 2 z)) 
+                         (fun i -> fun f z -> f i (f (i+1) z)) cons [];;
+       - : int list = [1; 2; 2; 3]
+
+Ta da!
+
+
+Montague's PTQ treatment of DPs as generalized quantifiers
+----------------------------------------------------------
+
+We've hinted that Montague's treatment of DPs as generalized
+quantifiers embodies the spirit of continuations (see de Groote 2001,
+Barker 2002 for lengthy discussion).  Let's see why.  
+
+First, we'll need a type constructor.  As you probably know, 
+Montague replaced individual-denoting determiner phrases (with type `e`)
+with generalized quantifiers (with [extensional] type `(e -> t) -> t`.
+In particular, the denotation of a proper name like *John*, which
+might originally denote a object `j` of type `e`, came to denote a
+generalized quantifier `fun pred -> pred j` of type `(e -> t) -> t`.
+Let's write a general function that will map individuals into their
+corresponding generalized quantifier:
+
+   gqize (a : e) = fun (p : e -> t) -> p a
+
+This function is what Partee 1987 calls LIFT, and it would be
+reasonable to use it here, but we will avoid that name, given that we
+use that word to refer to other functions.
+
+This function wraps up an individual in a box.  That is to say,
+we are in the presence of a monad.  The type constructor, the unit and
+the bind follow naturally.  We've done this enough times that we won't
+belabor the construction of the bind function, the derivation is
+highly similar to the List monad just given:
+
+       type 'a continuation = ('a -> 'b) -> 'b
+       c_unit (a : 'a) = fun (p : 'a -> 'b) -> p a
+       c_bind (u : ('a -> 'b) -> 'b) (f : 'a -> ('c -> 'd) -> 'd) : ('c -> 'd) -> 'd =
+         fun (k : 'a -> 'b) -> u (fun (a : 'a) -> f a k)
+
+Note that `c_unit` is exactly the `gqize` function that Montague used
+to lift individuals into the continuation monad.
+
+That last bit in `c_bind` looks familiar---we just saw something like
+it in the List monad.  How similar is it to the List monad?  Let's
+examine the type constructor and the terms from the list monad derived
+above:
+
+    type ('a, 'b) list' = ('a -> 'b -> 'b) -> 'b -> 'b
+    l'_unit a = fun f -> f a                 
+    l'_bind u f = fun k -> u (fun a -> f a k)
+
+(We performed a sneaky but valid eta reduction in the unit term.)
+
+The unit and the bind for the Montague continuation monad and the
+homemade List monad are the same terms!  In other words, the behavior
+of the List monad and the behavior of the continuations monad are
+parallel in a deep sense.
+
+Have we really discovered that lists are secretly continuations?  Or
+have we merely found a way of simulating lists using list
+continuations?  Well, strictly speaking, what we have done is shown
+that one particular implementation of lists---the right fold
+implementation---gives rise to a continuation monad fairly naturally,
+and that this monad can reproduce the behavior of the standard list
+monad.  But what about other list implementations?  Do they give rise
+to monads that can be understood in terms of continuations?
+
+Manipulating trees with monads
+------------------------------
+
+This topic develops an idea based on a detailed suggestion of Ken
+Shan's.  We'll build a series of functions that operate on trees,
+doing various things, including replacing leaves, counting nodes, and
+converting a tree to a list of leaves.  The end result will be an
+application for continuations.
+
+From an engineering standpoint, we'll build a tree transformer that
+deals in monads.  We can modify the behavior of the system by swapping
+one monad for another.  We've already seen how adding a monad can add
+a layer of funtionality without disturbing the underlying system, for
+instance, in the way that the reader monad allowed us to add a layer
+of intensionality to an extensional grammar, but we have not yet seen
+the utility of replacing one monad with other.
+
+First, we'll be needing a lot of trees during the remainder of the
+course.  Here's a type constructor for binary trees:
+
+    type 'a tree = Leaf of 'a | Node of ('a tree * 'a tree)
+
+These are trees in which the internal nodes do not have labels.  [How
+would you adjust the type constructor to allow for labels on the
+internal nodes?]
+
+We'll be using trees where the nodes are integers, e.g.,
+
+
+<pre>
+let t1 = Node ((Node ((Leaf 2), (Leaf 3))),
+               (Node ((Leaf 5),(Node ((Leaf 7),
+                                      (Leaf 11))))))
+
+    .
+ ___|___
+ |     |
+ .     .
+_|__  _|__
+|  |  |  |
+2  3  5  .
+        _|__
+        |  |
+        7  11
+</pre>
+
+Our first task will be to replace each leaf with its double:
+
+<pre>
+let rec treemap (newleaf:'a -> 'b) (t:'a tree):('b tree) =
+  match t with Leaf x -> Leaf (newleaf x)
+             | Node (l, r) -> Node ((treemap newleaf l),
+                                    (treemap newleaf r));;
+</pre>
+`treemap` takes a function that transforms old leaves into new leaves, 
+and maps that function over all the leaves in the tree, leaving the
+structure of the tree unchanged.  For instance:
+
+<pre>
+let double i = i + i;;
+treemap double t1;;
+- : int tree =
+Node (Node (Leaf 4, Leaf 6), Node (Leaf 10, Node (Leaf 14, Leaf 22)))
+
+    .
+ ___|____
+ |      |
+ .      .
+_|__  __|__
+|  |  |   |
+4  6  10  .
+        __|___
+        |    |
+        14   22
+</pre>
+
+We could have built the doubling operation right into the `treemap`
+code.  However, because what to do to each leaf is a parameter, we can
+decide to do something else to the leaves without needing to rewrite
+`treemap`.  For instance, we can easily square each leaf instead by
+supplying the appropriate `int -> int` operation in place of `double`:
+
+<pre>
+let square x = x * x;;
+treemap square t1;;
+- : int tree =ppp
+Node (Node (Leaf 4, Leaf 9), Node (Leaf 25, Node (Leaf 49, Leaf 121)))
+</pre>
+
+Note that what `treemap` does is take some global, contextual
+information---what to do to each leaf---and supplies that information
+to each subpart of the computation.  In other words, `treemap` has the
+behavior of a reader monad.  Let's make that explicit.  
+
+In general, we're on a journey of making our treemap function more and
+more flexible.  So the next step---combining the tree transducer with
+a reader monad---is to have the treemap function return a (monadized)
+tree that is ready to accept any `int->int` function and produce the
+updated tree.
+
+\tree (. (. (f2) (f3))(. (f5) (.(f7)(f11))))
+<pre>
+\f    .
+  ____|____
+  |       |
+  .       .
+__|__   __|__
+|   |   |   |
+f2  f3  f5  .
+          __|___
+          |    |
+          f7  f11
+</pre>
+
+That is, we want to transform the ordinary tree `t1` (of type `int
+tree`) into a reader object of type `(int->int)-> int tree`: something 
+that, when you apply it to an `int->int` function returns an `int
+tree` in which each leaf `x` has been replaced with `(f x)`.
+
+With previous readers, we always knew which kind of environment to
+expect: either an assignment function (the original calculator
+simulation), a world (the intensionality monad), an integer (the
+Jacobson-inspired link monad), etc.  In this situation, it will be
+enough for now to expect that our reader will expect a function of
+type `int->int`.
+
+<pre>
+type 'a reader = (int->int) -> 'a;;  (* mnemonic: e for environment *)
+let reader_unit (x:'a): 'a reader = fun _ -> x;;
+let reader_bind (u: 'a reader) (f:'a -> 'c reader):'c reader = fun e -> f (u e) e;;
+</pre>
+
+It's easy to figure out how to turn an `int` into an `int reader`:
+
+<pre>
+let int2int_reader (x:'a): 'b reader = fun (op:'a -> 'b) -> op x;;
+int2int_reader 2 (fun i -> i + i);;
+- : int = 4
+</pre>
+
+But what do we do when the integers are scattered over the leaves of a
+tree?  A binary tree is not the kind of thing that we can apply a
+function of type `int->int` to.
+
+<pre>
+let rec treemonadizer (f:'a -> 'b reader) (t:'a tree):('b tree) reader =
+  match t with Leaf x -> reader_bind (f x) (fun x' -> reader_unit (Leaf x'))
+             | Node (l, r) -> reader_bind (treemonadizer f l) (fun x ->
+                                reader_bind (treemonadizer f r) (fun y ->
+                                  reader_unit (Node (x, y))));;
+</pre>
+
+This function says: give me a function `f` that knows how to turn
+something of type `'a` into an `'b reader`, and I'll show you how to 
+turn an `'a tree` into an `'a tree reader`.  In more fanciful terms, 
+the `treemonadizer` function builds plumbing that connects all of the
+leaves of a tree into one connected monadic network; it threads the
+monad through the leaves.
+
+<pre>
+# treemonadizer int2int_reader t1 (fun i -> i + i);;
+- : int tree =
+Node (Node (Leaf 4, Leaf 6), Node (Leaf 10, Node (Leaf 14, Leaf 22)))
+</pre>
+
+Here, our environment is the doubling function (`fun i -> i + i`).  If
+we apply the very same `int tree reader` (namely, `treemonadizer
+int2int_reader t1`) to a different `int->int` function---say, the
+squaring function, `fun i -> i * i`---we get an entirely different
+result:
+
+<pre>
+# treemonadizer int2int_reader t1 (fun i -> i * i);;
+- : int tree =
+Node (Node (Leaf 4, Leaf 9), Node (Leaf 25, Node (Leaf 49, Leaf 121)))
+</pre>
+
+Now that we have a tree transducer that accepts a monad as a
+parameter, we can see what it would take to swap in a different monad.
+For instance, we can use a state monad to count the number of nodes in
+the tree.
+
+<pre>
+type 'a state = int -> 'a * int;;
+let state_unit x i = (x, i+.5);;
+let state_bind u f i = let (a, i') = u i in f a (i'+.5);;
+</pre>
+
+Gratifyingly, we can use the `treemonadizer` function without any
+modification whatsoever, except for replacing the (parametric) type
+`reader` with `state`:
+
+<pre>
+let rec treemonadizer (f:'a -> 'b state) (t:'a tree):('b tree) state =
+  match t with Leaf x -> state_bind (f x) (fun x' -> state_unit (Leaf x'))
+             | Node (l, r) -> state_bind (treemonadizer f l) (fun x ->
+                                state_bind (treemonadizer f r) (fun y ->
+                                  state_unit (Node (x, y))));;
+</pre>
+
+Then we can count the number of nodes in the tree:
+
+<pre>
+# treemonadizer state_unit t1 0;;
+- : int tree * int =
+(Node (Node (Leaf 2, Leaf 3), Node (Leaf 5, Node (Leaf 7, Leaf 11))), 13)
+
+    .
+ ___|___
+ |     |
+ .     .
+_|__  _|__
+|  |  |  |
+2  3  5  .
+        _|__
+        |  |
+        7  11
+</pre>
+
+Notice that we've counted each internal node twice---it's a good
+exercise to adjust the code to count each node once.
+
+One more revealing example before getting down to business: replacing
+`state` everywhere in `treemonadizer` with `list` gives us
+
+<pre>
+# treemonadizer (fun x -> [ [x; square x] ]) t1;;
+- : int list tree list =
+[Node
+  (Node (Leaf [2; 4], Leaf [3; 9]),
+   Node (Leaf [5; 25], Node (Leaf [7; 49], Leaf [11; 121])))]
+</pre>
+
+Unlike the previous cases, instead of turning a tree into a function
+from some input to a result, this transformer replaces each `int` with
+a list of `int`'s.
+
+Now for the main point.  What if we wanted to convert a tree to a list
+of leaves?  
+
+<pre>
+type ('a, 'r) continuation = ('a -> 'r) -> 'r;;
+let continuation_unit x c = c x;;
+let continuation_bind u f c = u (fun a -> f a c);;
+
+let rec treemonadizer (f:'a -> ('b, 'r) continuation) (t:'a tree):(('b tree), 'r) continuation =
+  match t with Leaf x -> continuation_bind (f x) (fun x' -> continuation_unit (Leaf x'))
+             | Node (l, r) -> continuation_bind (treemonadizer f l) (fun x ->
+                                continuation_bind (treemonadizer f r) (fun y ->
+                                  continuation_unit (Node (x, y))));;
+</pre>
+
+We use the continuation monad described above, and insert the
+`continuation` type in the appropriate place in the `treemonadizer` code.
+We then compute:
+
+<pre>
+# treemonadizer (fun a c -> a :: (c a)) t1 (fun t -> []);;
+- : int list = [2; 3; 5; 7; 11]
+</pre>
+
+We have found a way of collapsing a tree into a list of its leaves.
+
+The continuation monad is amazingly flexible; we can use it to
+simulate some of the computations performed above.  To see how, first
+note that an interestingly uninteresting thing happens if we use the
+continuation unit as our first argument to `treemonadizer`, and then
+apply the result to the identity function:
+
+<pre>
+# treemonadizer continuation_unit t1 (fun x -> x);;
+- : int tree =
+Node (Node (Leaf 2, Leaf 3), Node (Leaf 5, Node (Leaf 7, Leaf 11)))
+</pre>
+
+That is, nothing happens.  But we can begin to substitute more
+interesting functions for the first argument of `treemonadizer`:
+
+<pre>
+(* Simulating the tree reader: distributing a operation over the leaves *)
+# treemonadizer (fun a c -> c (square a)) t1 (fun x -> x);;
+- : int tree =
+Node (Node (Leaf 4, Leaf 9), Node (Leaf 25, Node (Leaf 49, Leaf 121)))
+
+(* Simulating the int list tree list *)
+# treemonadizer (fun a c -> c [a; square a]) t1 (fun x -> x);;
+- : int list tree =
+Node
+ (Node (Leaf [2; 4], Leaf [3; 9]),
+  Node (Leaf [5; 25], Node (Leaf [7; 49], Leaf [11; 121])))
+
+(* Counting leaves *)
+# treemonadizer (fun a c -> 1 + c a) t1 (fun x -> 0);;
+- : int = 5
+</pre>
+
+We could simulate the tree state example too, but it would require
+generalizing the type of the continuation monad to 
+
+    type ('a -> 'b -> 'c) continuation = ('a -> 'b) -> 'c;;
+
+The binary tree monad
+---------------------
+
+Of course, by now you may have realized that we have discovered a new
+monad, the binary tree monad:
+
+<pre>
+type 'a tree = Leaf of 'a | Node of ('a tree) * ('a tree);;
+let tree_unit (x:'a) = Leaf x;;
+let rec tree_bind (u:'a tree) (f:'a -> 'b tree):'b tree = 
+  match u with Leaf x -> f x 
+             | Node (l, r) -> Node ((tree_bind l f), (tree_bind r f));;
+</pre>
+
+For once, let's check the Monad laws.  The left identity law is easy:
+
+    Left identity: bind (unit a) f = bind (Leaf a) f = fa
+
+To check the other two laws, we need to make the following
+observation: it is easy to prove based on `tree_bind` by a simple
+induction on the structure of the first argument that the tree
+resulting from `bind u f` is a tree with the same strucure as `u`,
+except that each leaf `a` has been replaced with `fa`:
+
+\tree (. (fa1) (. (. (. (fa2)(fa3)) (fa4)) (fa5)))
+<pre>
+                .                         .       
+              __|__                     __|__   
+              |   |                     |   |   
+              a1  .                    fa1  .   
+                 _|__                     __|__ 
+                 |  |                     |   | 
+                 .  a5                    .  fa5
+   bind         _|__       f   =        __|__   
+                |  |                    |   |   
+                .  a4                   .  fa4  
+              __|__                   __|___   
+              |   |                   |    |   
+              a2  a3                 fa2  fa3         
+</pre>   
+
+Given this equivalence, the right identity law
+
+    Right identity: bind u unit = u
+
+falls out once we realize that
+
+    bind (Leaf a) unit = unit a = Leaf a
+
+As for the associative law,
+
+    Associativity: bind (bind u f) g = bind u (\a. bind (fa) g)
+
+we'll give an example that will show how an inductive proof would
+proceed.  Let `f a = Node (Leaf a, Leaf a)`.  Then
+
+\tree (. (. (. (. (a1)(a2)))))
+\tree (. (. (. (. (a1) (a1)) (. (a1) (a1)))  ))
+<pre>
+                                           .
+                                       ____|____
+          .               .            |       |
+bind    __|__   f  =    __|_    =      .       .
+        |   |           |   |        __|__   __|__
+        a1  a2         fa1 fa2       |   |   |   |
+                                     a1  a1  a1  a1  
+</pre>
+
+Now when we bind this tree to `g`, we get
+
+<pre>
+           .
+       ____|____
+       |       |
+       .       .
+     __|__   __|__
+     |   |   |   |
+    ga1 ga1 ga1 ga1  
+</pre>
+
+At this point, it should be easy to convince yourself that
+using the recipe on the right hand side of the associative law will
+built the exact same final tree.
+
+So binary trees are a monad.
+
+Haskell combines this monad with the Option monad to provide a monad
+called a
+[SearchTree](http://hackage.haskell.org/packages/archive/tree-monad/0.2.1/doc/html/src/Control-Monad-SearchTree.html#SearchTree)
+that is intended to 
+represent non-deterministic computations as a tree.
+
+##[[List Monad as Continuation Monad]]##
+
+##[[Manipulating Trees with Monads]]##
+