week1: fix markup processing?
[lambda.git] / week1.mdwn
index 801ae69..c13fa7c 100644 (file)
@@ -59,7 +59,6 @@ We'll tend to write <code>(&lambda;a M)</code> as just `(\a M)`, so we don't hav
 
 Some authors reserve the term "term" for just variables and abstracts. We'll probably just say "term" and "expression" indiscriminately for expressions of any of these three forms.
 
-<div>
 Examples of expressions:
 
        x
@@ -70,7 +69,6 @@ Examples of expressions:
        (\x (\y x))
        (x (\x x))
        ((\x (x x)) (\x (x x)))
-</div>
 
 The lambda calculus has an associated proof theory. For now, we can regard the
 proof theory as having just one rule, called the rule of **beta-reduction** or
@@ -605,7 +603,6 @@ Here's how it looks to say the same thing in various of these languages.
 
        It's easy to be lulled into thinking this is a kind of imperative construction. *But it's not!* It's really just a shorthand for the compound "let"-expressions we've already been looking at, taking the maximum syntactically permissible scope. (Compare the "dot" convention in the lambda calculus, discussed above.)
 
-
 9.     Some shorthand
 
        OCaml permits you to abbreviate:
@@ -654,6 +651,8 @@ Here's how it looks to say the same thing in various of these languages.
 
        or in other words, interpret the rest of the file or interactive session with `bar` assigned the function `(lambda (x) B)`.
 
+<!--
+
 
 10.    Shadowing
 
@@ -682,6 +681,7 @@ Here's how it looks to say the same thing in various of these languages.
 
        When a previously-bound variable is rebound in the way we see here, that's called **shadowing**: the outer binding is shadowed during the scope of the inner binding.
 
+-->
 
 Some more comparisons between Scheme and OCaml
 ----------------------------------------------