Monad Transformers step by step
[lambda.git] / topics / week9_state_monad_tutorial.mdwn
index 14628f7..13310a1 100644 (file)
@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@ The main benefit of these techniques is that it gives you better type-checking:
 
 OK, back to our walk-through of "A State Monad Tutorial". What shall we use for a store? Instead of a plain `int`, let's suppose our store is a structure of two values: a running total, and a count of how many times the store has been modified. We'll implement this with a record. Hence:
 
-    type store' = { total : int; modifications: int };;
+    type store' = { total : int; modifications: int }
 
 State monads employing this store will then have *three* salient values at any point in the computation: the `total` and `modifications` field in the store, and also the `'a` payload that is currently wrapped in the monadic box.
 
@@ -95,7 +95,7 @@ If we wanted to work with one of the encapsulation techniques described above, w
 
 Here is how you'd have to do it using our OCaml/Juli8 monad library:
 
-    (* have Juli8 loaded, as explained elsewhere *)
+    (* have Juli8 loaded, as explained elsewhere *)
     # module S = Monad.State(struct type store = store' end);;
     # let increment_store'' : 'a S.t =
         S.(get >>= fun cur ->
@@ -127,12 +127,12 @@ That ensures that the value we get at the end is the value returned by the first
 You should start to see here how chaining monadic values together gives us a kind of programming language. Of course, it's a cumbersome programming language. It'd be much easier to write, directly in OCaml:
 
     let value = s0.total
-    in (value, { total = s0.total + 2; modifications = s0.modifications + 2};;
+    in (value, { total = s0.total + 2; modifications = s0.modifications + 2})
 
 or, using pattern-matching on the record (you don't have to specify every field in the record):
 
     let { total = value; _ } = s0
-    in (value, { total = s0.total + 2; modifications = s0.modifications + 2};;
+    in (value, { total = s0.total + 2; modifications = s0.modifications + 2})
 
 But **the point of learning how to do this monadically** is that (1) monads show us how to embed more sophisticated programming techniques, such as imperative state and continuations, into frameworks that don't natively possess them (such as the set-theoretic metalanguage of Groenendijk, Stokhof and Veltman's paper); (2) becoming familiar with monads will enable you to see patterns you'd otherwise miss, and implement some seemingly complex computations using the same simple patterns (same-fringe is an example); and finally, of course (3) monads are delicious.
 
@@ -184,13 +184,13 @@ Here's an example from "A State Monad Tutorial":
 
     increment_store >> get >>= fun cur ->
         State (fun s -> ((), { total = s.total / 2; modifications = succ s.modifications })) >>
-    increment_store >> mid cur.total
+        increment_store >> mid cur.total
 
 Or, as you'd have to write it using our OCaml monad library:
 
     increment_store'' >> get >>= fun cur ->
         put { total = cur.total / 2; modifications = succ cur.modifications } >>
-    increment_store'' >> mid cur.total
+        increment_store'' >> mid cur.total
 
 
 The last topic covered in "A State Monad Tutorial" is the use of do-notation to work with monads in Haskell. We discuss that on our [translation page](/translating_between_OCaml_Scheme_and_Haskell).