gsv
[lambda.git] / topics / week7_introducing_monads.mdwn
index 49993ff..06dd06e 100644 (file)
@@ -380,9 +380,9 @@ That can be helpful, but it only enables us to have _zero or one_ elements in th
     let rec catmap (k : α -> β list) (xs : α list) : β list =
       match xs with
       | [] -> []
-      | x' :: xs' -> List.append (k x') (catmap f xs')
+      | x' :: xs' -> List.append (k x') (catmap k xs')
 
-Now we can have as many elements in the result for a given `α` as `k` cares to return. Another way to write `catmap k xs` is as (Haskell) `concat (map k cs)` or (OCaml) `List.flatten (List.map k xs)`. And this is just the definition of `mbind` or `>>=` for the List Monad. The definition of `mcomp` or `<=<`, that we gave above, differs only in that it's the way to compose two functions `j` and `k`, that you'd want to `catmap`, rather than the way to `catmap` one of those functions over a value that's already a list.
+Now we can have as many elements in the result for a given `α` as `k` cares to return. Another way to write `catmap k xs` is as (Haskell) `concat (map k xs)` or (OCaml) `List.flatten (List.map k xs)`. And this is just the definition of `mbind` or `>>=` for the List Monad. The definition of `mcomp` or `<=<`, that we gave above, differs only in that it's the way to compose two functions `j` and `k`, that you'd want to `catmap`, rather than the way to `catmap` one of those functions over a value that's already a list.
 
 This example is a good intuitive basis for thinking about the notions of `mbind` and `mcomp` more generally. Thus `mbind` for the option/Maybe type takes an option value, applies `k` to its element (if there is one), and returns the resulting option value. `mbind` for a tree with `α`-labeled leaves would apply `k` to each of the leaves, and return a tree containing arbitrarily large subtrees in place of all its former leaves, depending on what `k` returned.
 
@@ -466,4 +466,4 @@ Here is some other reading:
 *      [Haskell wikibook on Advanced Monads](http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/Advanced_monads)
 *      [Haskell wiki on Monad Laws](http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Monad_laws)
 
-There's a long list of monad tutorials linked at the [[Haskell wiki|https://wiki.haskell.org/Monad_tutorials_timeline]] (we linked to this at the top of the page), and on our own [[Offsite Reading]] page. (Skimming the titles is somewhat amusing.) If you are confused by monads, make use of these resources. Read around until you find a tutorial pitched at a level that's helpful for you.
+There's a long list of monad tutorials linked at the [[Haskell wiki|https://wiki.haskell.org/Monad_tutorials_timeline]] (we linked to this at the top of the page), and on our own [[Offsite Reading|/readings]] page. (Skimming the titles is somewhat amusing.) If you are confused by monads, make use of these resources. Read around until you find a tutorial pitched at a level that's helpful for you.