tweak final note
[lambda.git] / topics / week2_lambda_intro.mdwn
index 3718d31..d002abf 100644 (file)
@@ -228,7 +228,12 @@ abbreviates:
 
     ((\x (\y (x y))) x)
 
-We didn't have to insert any parentheses around the inner body of `\y. (x y)` because they were already there.
+The outermost parentheses were added because we have an application. `(\x. \y.
+...)` became `(\x (\y. ...))` because of the rule for dots. We didn't have to
+insert any parentheses around the inner body of `\y. (x y)` because they were
+already there. That is, in expressions of the form `\y. (...)`, the dot abbreviates
+nothing. It's harmless to write such a dot, though, and it can be conceptually
+helpful especially in light of the next convention...
 
 
 **Merging lambdas** An expression of the form `(\x (\y M))`, or equivalently, `(\x. \y. M)`, can be abbreviated as:
@@ -270,7 +275,7 @@ For some lambda terms, it is easy to see what function they represent:
 simply returns `M`: `((\x x) M) ~~> M`.
 
 > `(\x (x x))` duplicates its argument (applies it to itself):
-`((\x (x x)) M) ~~> (M M)` <!-- **M** or &omega;; W is \uv.uvv -->
+`((\x (x x)) M) ~~> (M M)` <!-- **M** or &omega;; W is \uv.uvv, L is \uv.u(vv) -->
 
 > `(\x (\y (y x)))` reorders its two arguments:
 `(((\x  (\y (y x))) M) N) ~~> (N M)` <!-- **T**; C is \uvx.uxv -->