edits
[lambda.git] / topics / _week10_gsv.mdwn
index 3fd046c..1cd25a8 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- λ ∃ Λ ∀ ≡ α β γ ρ ω φ ψ Ω ○ μ η δ ζ ξ ⋆ ★ • ∙ ● ⚫ 𝟎 𝟏 𝟐 𝟘 𝟙 𝟚 𝟬 𝟭 𝟮 ⇧ (U+2e17) ¢ -->
+<!-- Î» â\97\8a â\89  â\88\83 Î\9b â\88\80 â\89¡ Î± Î² Î³ Ï\81 Ï\89 Ï\86 Ï\88 Î© â\97\8b Î¼ Î· Î´ Î¶ Î¾ â\8b\86 â\98\85 â\80¢ â\88\99 â\97\8f â\9a« ð\9d\9f\8e ð\9d\9f\8f ð\9d\9f\90 ð\9d\9f\98 ð\9d\9f\99 ð\9d\9f\9a ð\9d\9f¬ ð\9d\9f­ ð\9d\9f® â\87§ (U+2e17) Â¢ -->
 
 [[!toc levels=2]]
 
@@ -9,7 +9,15 @@
 GSV are interested in developing and establishing a reasonable theory
 of discourse update.  One way of looking at this paper is like this:
 
-  GSV = GS + V
+  GSV = GS + V, where
+        
+  GS = Dynamic theories of binding of Groenendijk and Stokhof, e.g.,
+       Dynamic Predicate Logic L&P 1991: dynamic binding, donkey anaphora
+       Dynamic Montague Grammar 1990: generalized quantifiers, discourse referents
+
+  V = a dynamic theory of epistemic modality, e.g., 
+      Veltman, Frank. "Data semantics." 
+      In Truth, Interpretation and Information, Foris, Dordrecht (1984): 43-63.
 
 That is, Groenendijk and Stokhof have a well-known theory of dynamic
 semantics, and Veltman has a well-known theory of epistemic modality,
@@ -21,88 +29,42 @@ view and from a practical engineering point of view.  On the
 theoretical level, these scholars are proposing a strategy for
 managing the connection between variables and the objects they
 designate in way that is flexible enough to be useful for describing
-natural language.  The main way they attempt to do this is by
-inserting an extra level in between the variable and the object:
-instead of having an assignment function that maps variables directly
-onto objects, GSV provide *pegs*: variables map onto pegs, and pegs
-map onto objects.  We'll discuss in considerable detail what pegs
-allow us to do, since it is highly relevant to one of the main
-applications of the course, namely, reference and coreference.
+natural language.  
 
-What are pegs?  The term harks back to a paper by Landman called `Pegs
-and Alecs'.  There pegs are simply hooks for hanging properties on.
-Pegs are supposed to be as anonymous as possible.  Think of hanging
-your coat on a physical peg: you don't care which peg it is, only that
-there are enough pegs for everyone's coat to hang from.  Likewise, for
-the pegs of GSV, all that matters is that there are enough of them.
-(Incidentally, there is nothing in Gronendijk and Stokhof's original
-DPL paper that corresponds naturally to pegs; but in their Dynamic
-Montague Grammar paper, pegs serve a purpose similar to discourse
-referents there, though the connection is not simple.)
-
-On an engineering level, the fact that GSV are combining anaphora and
-bound quantification with epistemic quantification means that they are
-gluing together related but distinct subsystems into a single
-fragment.  These subsystems naturally cleave into separate layers in a
-way that is obscured in the paper.  We will argue in detail that
-re-engineering GSV using monads will lead to a cleaner system that
-does all of the same theoretical work.
-
-Empirical targets: on the anaphoric side, GSV want to 
-
-On the epistemic side, GSV aim to account for asymmetries such as
-
-    It might be raining.  It's not raining.
-    #It's not raining.  It might be raining.
-
-## Basics
-
-There are a lot of formal details in the paper in advance of the
-empirical discussion.  Here are the ones that matter:
-
-    type var = string
-    type peg = int
-    type refsys = var -> peg
-    type ent = Alice | Bob | Carl
-    type assignment = peg -> ent
-
-So in order to get from a variable to an object, we have to compose a
-refsys `r` with an assignment `g`.  For instance, we might have
-r (g ("x")) = Alice.
-
-    type pred = string
-    type world = pred -> ent -> bool
-    type pegcount = int
-    type poss = world * pegcount * refsys * assignment
-    type infostate = [poss]
+## Basics of GSV's fragment
 
-Worlds in general settle all matters of fact in the world.  In
-particular, they determine the extensions of predicates and relations.
-In this discussion, we'll (crudely) approximate worlds by making them
-a function from predicates such as "man" to a function mapping each
-entity to a boolean.  
+The fragment in this paper is unusually elegant.  We'll present it on
+its own terms, with the exception that we will not use pegs.  See the
+digression below concerning pegs for an explanation.  After presenting
+the paper, we'll re-engineering the fragment using explicit monads.
 
-As we'll see, indefinites as a side effect increase the number of pegs
-by one.  GSV assume that we can determine what integer the next unused
-peg corresponds to by examining the range of the refsys function.
-We'll make things easy on ourselves by simply tracking the total
-number of used pegs in a counter called `pegcount`.
+In this fragment, points of evaluation are not just worlds, but a pair
+of a world and an assginment function.  This is familiar from Heim's
+1983 File Change Semantics.  We'll follow GSV and call a
+world-assignment pair a "possibility".  Then a context is a set (an
+"information state") is a set of possiblities.  Infostates
+simultaneously track both information about the world (which possible
+worlds are live possibilities?) as well as information about the
+discourse (which objects to the variables refer to?).
 
-So information states track both facts about the world (e.g., which
-objects count as a man), and facts about the discourse (e.g., how many
-pegs have been used).
+Worlds in general settle all matters of fact in the world.  In
+particular, they determine the extensions of predicates and relations.
 
 The formal language the fragment interprets is Predicate Calculus with
-equality, existential and universal quantification, and one unary
-modality (box and diamond, corresponding to epistemic necessity and
-epistemic possibility).
+equality, existential and universal quantification, along with one
+unary modality (box and diamond, corresponding to epistemic necessity
+and epistemic possibility).
+
+An implementation in OCaml is available [[here|code/gsv.ml]]; consult
+that code for details of syntax, types, and values.  [[An implementation
+in Haskell|code/gsv.hs]] is available as well, if you prefer.
 
 Terms in this language are either individuals such as Alice or Bob, or
 else variables.  So in general, the referent of a term can depend on a
 possibility:
 
     ref(i, t) = t if t is an individual, and 
-                g(r(t)) if t is a variable, where i = (w,n,r,g)
+                g(t) if t is a variable, where i = (w,g)
 
 Here are the main clauses for update (their definition 3.1).  
 
@@ -111,31 +73,28 @@ state `s` with the information in φ) as `s[φ]`.
 
     s[P(t)] = {i in s | w(P)(ref(i,t))}
 
-So `man(x)` is the set of live possibilities `i = (w,r,g)` in s such that
+So `man(x)` is the set of live possibilities `i = (w,g)` in s such that
 the set of men in `w` given by `w(man)` maps the object referred to by
-`x`, namely, `r(g("x"))`, to `true`.   That is, update with "man(x)"
+`x`, namely, `g("x")`, to `true`.   That is, update with "man(x)"
 discards all possibilities in which "x" fails to refer to a man.
 
-    s[t1 = t2] = {i in s | ref(i,t1) = ref(i,t2)}
+    s[t1 = t2] = {i in s | ref(i,t1) == ref(i,t2)}
 
     s[φ and ψ] = s[φ][ψ]
 
 When updating with a conjunction, first update with the left conjunct,
 then update with the right conjunct.
 
-Existential quantification requires adding a new peg to the set of
-discourse referents.  
-
-    s[∃xφ] = {(w, n+1, r[x->n], g[n->a]) | (w,n,r,g) in s and a in ent}[φ]
+Existential quantification is somewhat intricate.
 
-Here's the recipe: for every possibility (w,n,r,g) in s, and for every
-entity a in the domain of discourse, construct a new possibility with
-the same world w, an incrementd peg count n+1, and a new r and g
-adjusted in such a way that the variable x refers to the object a.
+    s[∃xφ] = Union {{(w, g[x->a]) | (w,g) in s}[φ] | a in ent} 
 
-Note that this recipe does not examine φ.  This means that this
-analysis treats the formula prefix `∃x` as if it were a meaningful
-constituent independent of φ.
+Here's the recipe: given a starting infostate s, choose an object a
+from the domain of discourse.  Construct a modified infostate s' by
+adjusting the assignment function of each possibility so as to map the variable x to a.
+Then update s' with φ.  Finally, take the union over the results of
+doing this for every object a in the domain of discourse.  If you're
+unsure about this, examine the [[code|code/gsv.ml]].
 
 Negation is natural enough:
 
@@ -146,14 +105,490 @@ possibility i returns the empty information state, then not φ is true
 with respect to i.
 
 In GSV, disjunction, the conditional, and the universals are defined
-in terms of negation and the other connectives.
+in terms of negation and the other connectives (see fact 3.2).
+
+Exercise: assume that there are three entities in the domain of
+discourse, Alice, Bob, and Carl.  Assume that Alice is a woman, and
+Bob and Carl are men.
+
+Compute the following:
+
+    1. {(w,g)}[∃x.man(x)]
+
+       = {(w,g[n->a])}[man(x)] ++ {(w,g[n->b])}[man(x)] 
+                               ++ {(w,g[n->c])}[man(x)] 
+       = {} ++ {(w,g[n->b])} ++ {(w,g[n->c])}
+       = {(w,g[n->a]),(w,g[n->b]),(w,g[n->c])}
+       -- Bob and Carl are men
+
+    2. {(w,g)}[∃x.woman(x)]
+    3. {(w,g)}[∃x∃y.man(x) and man(y)]
+    4. {(w,n,r,g)}[∃x∃y.x=y]
+
+Running the [[code|code/gsv.ml]] gives the answers.
+
+
+## Order and modality
+
+The final remaining update rule concerns modality:
+
+    s[◊φ] = {i in s | s[φ] ≠ {}}
+
+This is a peculiar rule: a possibility `i` will survive update just in
+case something is true of the information state `s` as a whole.  That
+means that either every `i` in `s` will survive, or none of them will.
+The criterion is that updating `s` with the information in the
+prejacent φ does not produce the contradictory information state
+(i.e., `{}`).
+
+So let's explore what this means.  GSV offer a contrast between two
+discourses that differ only in the order in which the updates occur.
+The fact that the predictions of the fragment differ depending on
+order shows that the system is order-sensitive.
+
+    1. Alice isn't hungry.  #Alice might be hungry.
+
+According to GSV, the combination of these sentences in this order is
+`inconsistent', and they mark the second sentence with the star of
+ungrammaticality.  We'll say instead that the discourse is
+gramamtical, leave the exact way to think about its intuitive status
+up for grabs.  What is important for our purposes is to get clear on
+how the fragment behaves with respect to these sentences.
+
+We'll start with an infostate containing two possibilities.  In one
+possibility, Alice is hungry (call this possibility "hungry"); in the
+other, she is not (call it "full").
+
+      {hungry, full}[Alice isn't hungry][Alice might be hungry]
+    = {full}[Alice might be hungry]
+    = {}
+
+As usual in dynamic theories, a sequence of sentences is treated as if
+the sentence were conjoined.  This is the same thing as updating with
+the first sentence, then updating with the second sentence.
+Update with *Alice isn't hungry* eliminates the possibility in which
+Alice is hungry, leaving only the possibility in which she is full.
+Subsequent update with *Alice might be hungry* depends on the result
+of updating with the prejacent, *Alice is hungry*.  Let's do that side
+calculation:
+
+      {full}[Alice is hungry]
+    = {}
+
+Because the only possibility in the information state is one in which
+Alice is not hungry, update with *Alice is hungry* results in an empty
+information state.  That means that update with *Alice might be
+hungry* will also be empty, as indicated above.
+
+In order for update with *Alice might be hungry* to be non-empty,
+there must be at least one possibility in the input state in which
+Alice is hungry.  That is what epistemic might means in this fragment:
+the prejacent must be possible.  But update with *Alice isn't hungry*
+eliminates all possibilities in which Alice is hungry.  So the
+prediction of the fragment is that update with the sequence in (1)
+will always produce an empty information state.
+
+In contrast, consider the sentences in the opposite order:
+
+    2. Alice might be hungry.  Alice isn't hungry.
+
+We'll start with the same two possibilities.
+
+    = {hungry, full}[Alice might be hungry][Alice isn't hungry]
+    = {hungry, full}[Alice isn't hungry]
+    = {full}
+
+GSV comment that a single speaker couldn't possibly be in a position
+to utter the discourse in (2).  The reason is that in order for the
+speaker to appropriately assert that Alice isn't hungry, that speaker
+would have to possess knowledge (or sufficient justification,
+depending on your theory of the norms for assertion) that Alice isn't
+hungry.  But if they know that Alice isn't hungry, they couldn't
+appropriately assert *Alice might be hungry*, based on the predictions
+of the fragment.  
+
+Another view is that it can be acceptable to assert a sentence if it
+is supported by the information in the common ground.  So if the
+speaker assumes that as far as the listener knows, Alice might be
+hungry, they can utter the discourse in (2).  Here's a variant that
+makes this thought more vivid:
+
+    3. Based on public evidence, Alice might be hungry.  
+       But in fact I have private knowledge that she's not hungry.
+
+The main point to appreciate here is that the update behavior of the
+discourses depends on the order in which the updates due to the
+individual sentence occur.  
+
+Note, incidentally, that there is an asymmetry in the fragment
+concerning negation.
+
+    4. Alice might be hungry.  Alice *is* hungry.
+    5. Alice is hungry.  (So of course) Alice might be hungry.
+
+Both of these discourses lead to the same update effect: all and only
+those possibilites in which Alice is hungry survive.  You might think
+that asserting *might* requires that the prejacent be not only
+possible, but undecided.  If you like this idea, you can easily write
+an update rule for the diamond on which update with the prejacent and
+its negation must both be non-empty.
+
+## Order and binding
+
+The GSV fragment differs from the DPL and the DMG dynamic semantics in
+important details.  Nevertheless, it says something highly similar to
+DPL about anaphora, binding, quantificational binding, and donkey
+anaphora (at least, when modality is absent, as we'll discuss below).
+
+In particular, continuing the theme of order-based asymmetries,
+
+    6. A man^x entered.  He_x sat.
+    7. He_x sat.  A man^x entered.
+
+These discourses differ only in the order of the sentences.  Yet the
+first allows for coreference between the indefinite and the pronoun,
+where the second discourse does not.  In order to demonstrate, we'll
+need an information state whose refsys is defined for at least one
+variable.
+
+    8. {(w,g[x->b])}
+
+This infostate contains a refsys and an assignment that maps the
+variable x to Bob.  Here are the facts in world w:
+
+    extension w "enter" a = false
+    extension w "enter" b = true
+    extension w "enter" c = true
+
+    extension w "sit" a = true
+    extension w "sit" b = true
+    extension w "sit" c = false
+
+We can now consider the discourses in (6) and (7) (after magically
+converting them to the Predicate Calculus):
+
+    9. Someone^x entered.  He_x sat.  
+
+         {(w,g[x->b])}[∃x.enter(x)][sit(x)]
+
+       = (   {(w,g[x->b][x->a])}[enter(x)]
+          ++ {(w,g[x->b][x->b])}[enter(x)]
+          ++ {(w,g[x->b][x->c])}[enter(x)])[sit(x)]
+
+          -- "enter(x)" filters out the possibility in which x refers
+          -- to Alice, since Alice didn't enter
+
+       = (   {}
+          ++ {(w,g[x->b][x->b])}
+          ++ {(w,g[x->b][x->c])})[sit(x)]
+
+          -- "sit(x)" filters out the possibility in which x refers
+          -- to Carl, since Carl didn't sit
+
+       =  {(w,g[x->b][x->b])}
+
+One of the key facts here is that even though the existential has
+scope only over the first sentence, in effect it binds the pronoun in
+the following clause.  This is characteristic of dynamic theories in
+the style of Groenendijk and Stokhof, including DPL and DMG. 
+
+The outcome is different if the order of the sentences is reversed.
+
+    10. He_x sat.  Someone^x entered. 
 
-Exercise: assume that there are two entities in the domain of
-discourse, Alice and Bob.  Assume that Alice is a woman, and Bob is a
-man.  Show the following computations:
+         {(w,g[x->b])}[sit(x)][∃x.enter(x)]
+
+         -- evaluating `sit(x)` rules out nothing, since (coincidentally)
+         -- x refers to Bob, and Bob is a sitter
+
+       = {(w,g[x->b])}[∃x.enter(x)]
+
+         -- Just as before, the existential adds a new peg and assigns
+         -- it to each object
+
+       =    {(w,g[x->b][x->a])}[enter(x)]
+         ++ {(w,g[x->b][x->b])}[enter(x)]
+         ++ {(w,g[x->b][x->c])}[enter(x)]
+
+         -- enter(x) eliminates all those possibilities in which x did
+         -- not enter
+
+       = {} ++ {(w,g[x->b][x->b])}
+            ++ {(w,g[x->b][x->c])}
+
+       = {(w,g[x->b][x->b]), (w,g[x->b][x->c])}
+
+The result is different than before.  Before, there was only one
+possibility: that x refered to the only person who both entered and
+sat.  Here, there remain two possibilities: that x refers to Bob, or
+that x refers to Carl.  This makes predictions about the
+interpretation of continuations of the dialogs:
+
+    11. A man^x entered.  He_x sat.  He_x spoke.
+    12. He_x sat.  A man^x entered.  He_x spoke.
+
+The construal of (11) as marked entails that the person who spoke also
+entered and sat.  The construal of (12) guarantees only that the
+person who spoke also entered.  There is no guarantee that the person
+who spoke sat.  
+
+Intuitively, there is a strong impression in (12) that the person who
+entered and spoke not only should not be identified as the person who
+sat, he should be different from the person who sat.  Some dynamic
+systems, such as Heim's File Change Semantics, guarantee non-identity.
+That is not guaranteed by the GSV fragment.  If you wanted to add this
+as a refinement to the fragment, you could require that the
+existential only considers object in the domain that are not in the
+range of the starting assignment function.
+
+As usual with dynamic semantics, a point of pride is the ability to
+give a good account of donkey anaphora, as in
+
+    13. If a woman entered, she sat.
+
+See the paper for details.
+
+## Interactions of binding with modality
+
+At this point, we have a fragment that handles modality, and that
+handles indefinites and pronouns.  It it only interesting to combine
+these two elements if they interact in non-trivial ways.  This is
+exactly what GSV argue.
+
+The discussion of indefinites in the previous section established the
+following dynamic equivalence:
+
+    (∃x.enter(x)) and (sit(x)) ≡ ∃x (enter(x) and sit(x))
+
+In words, existentials take effective scope over subsequent clauses.
+
+The presence of modal possibility, however, disrupts this
+generalization.  GSV illustrate this with the following story.
+
+    The Broken Vase:
+    There are three children: Alice, Bob, and Carl.
+    One of them broke a vase.  
+    Alice is known to be innocent.  
+    Someone is hiding in the closet.
+
+    (∃x.closet(x)) and (◊guilty(x)) ≡/≡ ∃x (closet(x) and ◊guilty(x))
+
+To see this, we'll start with the left hand side.  We'll need at least
+two worlds.
+
+        in closet        guilty 
+        ---------------  ---------------
+    w:  a  true          a  false
+        b  false         b  true
+        c  true          c  false
+
+    w': a  false         a  false
+        b  false         b  false
+        c  true          c  true
+
+GSV say that (∃x.closet(x)) and (◊guilty(x)) is true if there is at
+least one possibility in which a person in the closet is guilty.  In
+this scenario, world w' is the verifying world: Carl is in the closet,
+and he's guilty.  It remains possible that there are closet hiders who
+are not guilty in any world.  Alice fits this bill: she's in the
+closet in world w', but she is not guilty in any world.
+
+Let's see how this works out in detail.
+
+    14. Someone^x is in the closet.  He_x might be guilty.
+
+         {(w,g), (w',g}[∃x.closet(x)][◊guilty(x)]
+
+         -- existential introduces new peg
+
+       = (   {(w,g[x->a])}[closet(x)]
+          ++ {(w,g[x->b])}[closet(x)]
+          ++ {(w,g[x->c])}[closet(x)]
+          ++ {(w',g[x->a])}[closet(x)]
+          ++ {(w',g[x->b])}[closet(x)]
+          ++ {(w',g[x->c])}[closet(x)])[◊guilty(x)]
+
+         -- only possibilities in which x is in the closet survive
+         -- the first update
+
+       = {(w,g[x->a]), (w',g[x->c])}[◊guilty(x)]
+
+         -- Is there any possibility in which x is guilty?
+         -- yes: for x = Carl, in world w' Carl broke the vase
+         -- that's enough for the possiblity modal to allow the entire
+         -- infostate to pass through unmodified.
+
+       = {(w,g[x->a]),(w',g[x->c])}
+
+Now we consider the second half:
+
+    15. Someone^x is in the closet who_x might be guilty.
+
+         {(w,g), (w',g)}[∃x(closet(x) & ◊guilty(x))]
+       
+       =    {(w,g[x->a])}[closet(x)][◊guilty(x)]
+         ++ {(w,g[x->b])}[closet(x)][◊guilty(x)]
+         ++ {(w,g[x->c])}[closet(x)][◊guilty(x)]
+         ++ {(w',g[x->a])}[closet(x)][◊guilty(x)]
+         ++ {(w',g[x->b])}[closet(x)][◊guilty(x)]
+         ++ {(w',g[x->c])}[closet(x)][◊guilty(x)]
+
+          -- filter out possibilities in which x is not in the closet
+          -- and filter out possibilities in which x is not guilty
+          -- the only person who was guilty in the closet was Carl in
+          -- world w'
+
+       = {(w',g[x->c])}
+
+The result is different.  Fewer possibilities remain.
+We have elminated both possible worlds and possible discourses.
+So the second formula is more informative.
+
+One of main conclusions of GSV is that in the presence of modality,
+the hallmark of dynamic treatments--that existentials bind outside of 
+their syntactic scope--needs to refined into a more nuanced understanding.
+Binding still occurs, but the extent of the syntactic scope of an existential
+has a detectable effect on truth conditions.
+
+As we discovered in class, there is considerable work to be done to
+decide which expressions in natural language (if any) are capable of
+expressing which of the two translations into the GSV fragment.  We
+can certainly grasp the truth conditions, but that is not the same
+thing as discovering that there are natural language sentences that
+express one or the other or both.
+
+
+## Binding, modality, and identity
+
+The fragment correctly predicts the following contrast:
+
+    16. Someone^x entered.  He_x might be Bob.  He_x might not be Bob.
+        (∃x.enter(x)) & ◊x=b & ◊not(x=b)
+        -- This discourse requires a possibility in which Bob entered
+        -- and another possibility in which someone who is not Bob entered
+
+    17. Someone^x entered who might be Bob and who might not be Bob.
+        ∃x (enter(x) & ◊x=b & ◊not(x=b))
+        -- This is a contradition: there is no single person who might be Bob
+        -- and who simultaneously might be someone else
+
+These formulas are expressing extensional, de-reish intuitions.  If we
+add individual concepts to the fragment, the ability to express
+fancier claims would come along.
+
+## GSV's "Identifiers"
+
+Let α be a term which differs from x.  Then α is an identifier if the
+following formula is supported by every information state:
+
+    ∀x(◊(x=α) --> (x=α))
+
+The idea is that α is an identifier just in case there is only one
+object that it can refer to.  Here is what GSV say:
+
+    A term is an identifier per se if no mattter what the information
+    state is, it cannot fail to decie what the denotation of the term is.
+
+## Digression on pegs
+
+One of the more salient aspects of the technical part of the paper is
+that GSV insert an extra level in between the variable and the object:
+instead of having an assignment function that maps variables directly
+onto objects, GSV provide *pegs*: variables map onto pegs, and pegs
+map onto objects.  It happens that pegs play no role in the paper
+whatsoever.  We'll demonstrate this by providing a faithful
+implementation of the paper that does not use pegs at all.
+
+Nevertheless, it makes sense to pause here to discuss pegs briefly,
+since this technique is highly relevant to one of the main
+applications of the course, namely, reference and coreference.
 
-    1. {}[∃x.person(x)]
-    2. {}[∃x.man(x)]
-    3. {}[∃x∃y.person(x) and person(y)]
-    4. {}[∃x∃y.x=x]
-    5. {}[∃x∃y.x=y]
+What are pegs?  The term harks back to a 1986 paper by Fred Landman
+called `Pegs and Alecs'.  Pegs are simply hooks for hanging properties
+on.  Pegs are supposed to be as anonymous as possible.  Think of
+hanging your coat on a physical peg: you don't care which peg it is,
+only that there are enough pegs for everyone's coat to hang from.
+Likewise, for the pegs of GSV, all that matters is that there are
+enough of them.  (Incidentally, there is nothing in Gronendijk and
+Stokhof's original DPL paper that corresponds naturally to pegs; but
+in their Dynamic Montague Grammar paper, pegs serve a purpose similar
+to discourse referents there, though the connection is not simple.)
+
+Pegs can be highly useful for exploring puzzles of reference and
+coreference.
+
+    Standard assignment function    System with Pegs (drefs)
+    ----------------------------    ------------------------
+     Variable      Object           Var      Peg      Object
+    ---------      -------          ---      ---      ------
+        x     -->    a               x   -->  0   -->   a
+        y     -/                     y   -/   
+        z     -->    b               z   -->  1   -->   a
+
+A standard assignment function can map two different variables onto
+the same object.  In the diagram, x and y are both mapped onto the
+object a.  With discourse referents in view, we can have two different
+flavors of coreference.  Just as with ordinary assignment functions,
+variables can be mapped onto pegs (discourse referents) that are in
+turn mapped onto the same object.  In the diagram, x is mapped onto
+the peg 0, which in turn is mapped onto the object a, and z is mapped
+onto a discourse referent that is mapped onto a.  On a deeper level,
+we can suppose that y is mapped onto the same discourse referent as
+x.  With a system like this, we are free to reassign the discourse
+referent associated with z to a different object, in which case x and
+z will no longer refer to the same object.  But there is no way to
+change the object associated with x without necessarily changing the
+object associated with y.  They are coreferent in a deeper, less
+accidental sense.  
+
+GSV could make use of this expressive power.  But they don't.  In
+fact, their system is careful designed to guarantee that every
+variable is assigned a discourse referent distinct from all previous
+discourse referents.
+
+The addition of pegs tracks an active discussion in the dynamic
+literature around the time of publication of the paper.  Groenendijk
+and Stokhof (Two theories of dynamic semantics, 1989) noted that it
+was possible in DPL for information to be "lost".
+
+    18. (∃x.P(x)) & (∃x.Q(x)) & R(x)
+
+If the two existentials happen to bind the same variable (here, "x"),
+then the second existential occludes the first.  That is, at the point
+at which we evalute R(x), all of the assignment functions will be
+mapping the variable "x" to objects that have property Q.  The
+information that there exist objects with property P has been lost.
+If you want your dynamic system to be eliminative---or in more general
+terms, if you want the amount of information embodied by an updated
+information state to be monotonically increasing---then this is a
+problem.  
+
+A syntactic solution is to require that the variable bound
+by an existential to be chosen fresh.
+
+Vermeulen, Cees FM. "Merging without mystery or: Variables in dynamics
+semantics." Journal of Philosophical Logic 24.4 (1995): 405-450 offers
+a different approach, one based on *referent systems*.  GSV's pegs are
+a referent system.  In the pegs system, when (18) is processed, the
+information that there is an object that has property P is maintained
+in the information state.  Curiously, however, there is still no way
+to refer to that object, at least, not with a variable, since there is
+no variable that is associated with the peg that points to the
+relevant object.  So the information is present, but not accessible. 
+
+That does not mean that there aren't other expression types that are
+able to latch onto peg.  An intriguing suggestion based on an example
+in Vermeulen is that "former" might be able to provide access to a
+hidden peg:
+
+    19. Someone entered.  Someone spoke.  The former was a woman.
+
+Presumably we want *the former* to be able to pick out the person who
+entered, whether or not the two existentials bind the same variable or
+not.  If we allow "former" to latch onto the second most recently
+established peg, no matter whether there is a variable still pointing
+to that peg, the desired effect is achieved. 
+
+But none of this is relevant for any of the explanations or analyses
+provide by the GSV fragment, and it is considerably simpler to see
+what their fragment is about if we leave referent systems out of it.