manip trees: tweaks
[lambda.git] / manipulating_trees_with_monads.mdwn
index c279c38..de8fc5f 100644 (file)
@@ -28,14 +28,14 @@ internal nodes?]
 We'll be using trees where the nodes are integers, e.g.,
 
 
-       let t1 = Node ((Node ((Leaf 2), (Leaf 3))),
-                      (Node ((Leaf 5),(Node ((Leaf 7),
-                                             (Leaf 11))))))
+       let t1 = Node (Node (Leaf 2, Leaf 3),
+                      Node (Leaf 5, Node (Leaf 7,
+                                             Leaf 11)))
            .
         ___|___
         |     |
         .     .
-       _|__  _|__
+       _|_   _|__
        |  |  |  |
        2  3  5  .
                _|__
@@ -47,8 +47,8 @@ Our first task will be to replace each leaf with its double:
        let rec treemap (newleaf : 'a -> 'b) (t : 'a tree) : 'b tree =
          match t with
            | Leaf x -> Leaf (newleaf x)
-           | Node (l, r) -> Node ((treemap newleaf l),
-                                  (treemap newleaf r));;
+           | Node (l, r) -> Node (treemap newleaf l,
+                                  treemap newleaf r);;
 
 `treemap` takes a function that transforms old leaves into new leaves,
 and maps that function over all the leaves in the tree, leaving the
@@ -89,47 +89,46 @@ behavior of a reader monad.  Let's make that explicit.
 In general, we're on a journey of making our treemap function more and
 more flexible.  So the next step---combining the tree transformer with
 a reader monad---is to have the treemap function return a (monadized)
-tree that is ready to accept any `int->int` function and produce the
+tree that is ready to accept any `int -> int` function and produce the
 updated tree.
 
-\tree (. (. (f2) (f3))(. (f5) (.(f7)(f11))))
 
-       \f    .
-         ____|____
-         |       |
-         .       .
-       __|__   __|__
-       |   |   |   |
-       f2  f3  f5  .
-                 __|___
-                 |    |
-                 f7  f11
+       \f      .
+          _____|____
+          |        |
+          .        .
+        __|___   __|___
+        |    |   |    |
+       f 2  f 3  f 5  .
+                    __|___
+                    |    |
+                   f 7  f 11
 
 That is, we want to transform the ordinary tree `t1` (of type `int
-tree`) into a reader object of type `(int->int)-> int tree`: something
-that, when you apply it to an `int->int` function returns an `int
-tree` in which each leaf `x` has been replaced with `(f x)`.
+tree`) into a reader object of type `(int -> int) -> int tree`: something
+that, when you apply it to an `int -> int` function `f` returns an `int
+tree` in which each leaf `x` has been replaced with `f x`.
 
 With previous readers, we always knew which kind of environment to
 expect: either an assignment function (the original calculator
 simulation), a world (the intensionality monad), an integer (the
 Jacobson-inspired link monad), etc.  In this situation, it will be
 enough for now to expect that our reader will expect a function of
-type `int->int`.
+type `int -> int`.
 
-       type 'a reader = (int->int) -> 'a;;  (* mnemonic: e for environment *)
-       let reader_unit (x : 'a) : 'a reader = fun _ -> x;;
-       let reader_bind (u: 'a reader) (f : 'a -> 'c reader) : 'c reader = fun e -> f (u e) e;;
+       type 'a reader = (int -> int) -> 'a;;  (* mnemonic: e for environment *)
+       let reader_unit (a : 'a) : 'a reader = fun _ -> a;;
+       let reader_bind (u: 'a reader) (f : 'a -> 'b reader) : 'b reader = fun e -> f (u e) e;;
 
 It's easy to figure out how to turn an `int` into an `int reader`:
 
-       let int2int_reader (x : 'a): 'b reader = fun (op : 'a -> 'b) -> op x;;
+       let int2int_reader : 'a -> 'b reader = fun (a : 'a) -> fun (op : 'a -> 'b) -> op a;;
        int2int_reader 2 (fun i -> i + i);;
        - : int = 4
 
 But what do we do when the integers are scattered over the leaves of a
 tree?  A binary tree is not the kind of thing that we can apply a
-function of type `int->int` to.
+function of type `int -> int` to.
 
        let rec treemonadizer (f : 'a -> 'b reader) (t : 'a tree) : 'b tree reader =
            match t with
@@ -143,7 +142,7 @@ something of type `'a` into an `'b reader`, and I'll show you how to
 turn an `'a tree` into an `'a tree reader`.  In more fanciful terms,
 the `treemonadizer` function builds plumbing that connects all of the
 leaves of a tree into one connected monadic network; it threads the
-monad through the leaves.
+`'b reader` monad through the leaves.
 
        # treemonadizer int2int_reader t1 (fun i -> i + i);;
        - : int tree =
@@ -151,7 +150,7 @@ monad through the leaves.
 
 Here, our environment is the doubling function (`fun i -> i + i`).  If
 we apply the very same `int tree reader` (namely, `treemonadizer
-int2int_reader t1`) to a different `int->int` function---say, the
+int2int_reader t1`) to a different `int -> int` function---say, the
 squaring function, `fun i -> i * i`---we get an entirely different
 result:
 
@@ -159,18 +158,18 @@ result:
        - : int tree =
        Node (Node (Leaf 4, Leaf 9), Node (Leaf 25, Node (Leaf 49, Leaf 121)))
 
-Now that we have a tree transformer that accepts a monad as a
+Now that we have a tree transformer that accepts a reader monad as a
 parameter, we can see what it would take to swap in a different monad.
 For instance, we can use a state monad to count the number of nodes in
 the tree.
 
        type 'a state = int -> 'a * int;;
-       let state_unit x i = (x, i+.5);;
-       let state_bind u f i = let (a, i') = u i in f a (i'+.5);;
+       let state_unit a = fun i -> (a, i);;
+       let state_bind u f = fun i -> let (a, i') = u i in f a (i' + 1);;
 
 Gratifyingly, we can use the `treemonadizer` function without any
 modification whatsoever, except for replacing the (parametric) type
-`reader` with `state`:
+`'b reader` with `'b state`, and substituting in the appropriate unit and bind:
 
        let rec treemonadizer (f : 'a -> 'b state) (t : 'a tree) : 'b tree state =
            match t with
@@ -199,6 +198,15 @@ Then we can count the number of nodes in the tree:
 Notice that we've counted each internal node twice---it's a good
 exercise to adjust the code to count each node once.
 
+<!--
+A tree with n leaves has 2n - 1 nodes.
+This function will currently return n*1 + (n-1)*2 = 3n - 2.
+To convert b = 3n - 2 into 2n - 1, we can use: let n = (b + 2)/3 in 2*n -1
+
+But I assume Chris means here, adjust the code so that no corrections of this sort have to be applied.
+-->
+
+
 One more revealing example before getting down to business: replacing
 `state` everywhere in `treemonadizer` with `list` gives us