manip trees: more explanation
[lambda.git] / manipulating_trees_with_monads.mdwn
index d0897ef..61d2964 100644 (file)
@@ -44,18 +44,18 @@ We'll be using trees where the nodes are integers, e.g.,
 
 Our first task will be to replace each leaf with its double:
 
-       let rec treemap (newleaf : 'a -> 'b) (t : 'a tree) : 'b tree =
+       let rec tree_map (leaf_modifier : 'a -> 'b) (t : 'a tree) : 'b tree =
          match t with
-           | Leaf i -> Leaf (newleaf i)
-           | Node (l, r) -> Node (treemap newleaf l,
-                                  treemap newleaf r);;
+           | Leaf i -> Leaf (leaf_modifier i)
+           | Node (l, r) -> Node (tree_map leaf_modifier l,
+                                  tree_map leaf_modifier r);;
 
-`treemap` takes a function that transforms old leaves into new leaves,
+`tree_map` takes a function that transforms old leaves into new leaves,
 and maps that function over all the leaves in the tree, leaving the
 structure of the tree unchanged.  For instance:
 
        let double i = i + i;;
-       treemap double t1;;
+       tree_map double t1;;
        - : int tree =
        Node (Node (Leaf 4, Leaf 6), Node (Leaf 10, Node (Leaf 14, Leaf 22)))
        
@@ -70,25 +70,25 @@ structure of the tree unchanged.  For instance:
                |    |
                14   22
 
-We could have built the doubling operation right into the `treemap`
-code.  However, because what to do to each leaf is a parameter, we can
+We could have built the doubling operation right into the `tree_map`
+code.  However, because we've left what to do to each leaf as a parameter, we can
 decide to do something else to the leaves without needing to rewrite
-`treemap`.  For instance, we can easily square each leaf instead by
+`tree_map`.  For instance, we can easily square each leaf instead by
 supplying the appropriate `int -> int` operation in place of `double`:
 
        let square i = i * i;;
-       treemap square t1;;
+       tree_map square t1;;
        - : int tree =ppp
        Node (Node (Leaf 4, Leaf 9), Node (Leaf 25, Node (Leaf 49, Leaf 121)))
 
-Note that what `treemap` does is take some global, contextual
+Note that what `tree_map` does is take some unchanging contextual
 information---what to do to each leaf---and supplies that information
-to each subpart of the computation.  In other words, `treemap` has the
+to each subpart of the computation.  In other words, `tree_map` has the
 behavior of a reader monad.  Let's make that explicit.
 
-In general, we're on a journey of making our treemap function more and
+In general, we're on a journey of making our `tree_map` function more and
 more flexible.  So the next step---combining the tree transformer with
-a reader monad---is to have the treemap function return a (monadized)
+a reader monad---is to have the `tree_map` function return a (monadized)
 tree that is ready to accept any `int -> int` function and produce the
 updated tree.
 
@@ -113,77 +113,106 @@ tree` in which each leaf `i` has been replaced with `f i`.
 With previous readers, we always knew which kind of environment to
 expect: either an assignment function (the original calculator
 simulation), a world (the intensionality monad), an integer (the
-Jacobson-inspired link monad), etc.  In this situation, it will be
-enough for now to expect that our reader will expect a function of
-type `int -> int`.
+Jacobson-inspired link monad), etc.  In the present case, we expect that our "environment" will be some function of type `int -> int`. "Looking up" some `int` in the environment will return us the `int` that comes out the other side of that function.
 
        type 'a reader = (int -> int) -> 'a;;  (* mnemonic: e for environment *)
        let reader_unit (a : 'a) : 'a reader = fun _ -> a;;
        let reader_bind (u: 'a reader) (f : 'a -> 'b reader) : 'b reader = fun e -> f (u e) e;;
 
-It's easy to figure out how to turn an `int` into an `int reader`:
+It would be a simple matter to turn an *integer* into an `int reader`:
 
-       let int2int_reader : 'a -> 'b reader = fun (a : 'a) -> fun (op : 'a -> 'b) -> op a;;
-       int2int_reader 2 (fun i -> i + i);;
+       let int_readerize : int -> int reader = fun (a : int) -> fun (modifier : int -> int) -> modifier a;;
+       int_readerize 2 (fun i -> i + i);;
        - : int = 4
 
-But what do we do when the integers are scattered over the leaves of a
-tree?  A binary tree is not the kind of thing that we can apply a
+But how do we do the analagous transformation when our `int`s are scattered over the leaves of a tree? How do we turn an `int tree` into a reader?
+A tree is not the kind of thing that we can apply a
 function of type `int -> int` to.
 
-       let rec treemonadizer (f : 'a -> 'b reader) (t : 'a tree) : 'b tree reader =
+But we can do this:
+
+       let rec tree_monadize (f : 'a -> 'b reader) (t : 'a tree) : 'b tree reader =
            match t with
            | Leaf i -> reader_bind (f i) (fun i' -> reader_unit (Leaf i'))
-           | Node (l, r) -> reader_bind (treemonadizer f l) (fun x ->
-                              reader_bind (treemonadizer f r) (fun y ->
+           | Node (l, r) -> reader_bind (tree_monadize f l) (fun x ->
+                              reader_bind (tree_monadize f r) (fun y ->
                                 reader_unit (Node (x, y))));;
 
 This function says: give me a function `f` that knows how to turn
-something of type `'a` into an `'b reader`, and I'll show you how to
-turn an `'a tree` into an `'a tree reader`.  In more fanciful terms,
-the `treemonadizer` function builds plumbing that connects all of the
-leaves of a tree into one connected monadic network; it threads the
-`'b reader` monad through the leaves.
+something of type `'a` into an `'b reader`---this is a function of the same type that you could bind an `'a reader` to---and I'll show you how to
+turn an `'a tree` into an `'b tree reader`.  That is, if you show me how to do this:
+
+                     ------------
+         1     --->  |    1     |
+                     ------------
+
+then I'll give you back the ability to do this:
+
+                     ____________
+         .           |    .     |
+       __|___  --->  |  __|___  |
+       |    |        |  |    |  |
+       1    2        |  1    2  |
+                     ------------
+
+And how will that boxed tree behave? Whatever actions you perform on it will be transmitted down to corresponding operations on its leaves. For instance, our `int reader` expects an `int -> int` environment. If supplying environment `e` to our `int reader` doubles the contained `int`:
 
-       # treemonadizer int2int_reader t1 (fun i -> i + i);;
+                     ------------
+         1     --->  |    1     |  applied to e  ~~>  2
+                     ------------
+
+Then we can expect that supplying it to our `int tree reader` will double all the leaves:
+
+                     ____________
+         .           |    .     |                      .
+       __|___  --->  |  __|___  | applied to e  ~~>  __|___
+       |    |        |  |    |  |                    |    |
+       1    2        |  1    2  |                    2    4
+                     ------------
+
+In more fanciful terms, the `tree_monadize` function builds plumbing that connects all of the leaves of a tree into one connected monadic network; it threads the
+`'b reader` monad through the original tree's leaves.
+
+       # tree_monadize int_readerize t1 double;;
        - : int tree =
        Node (Node (Leaf 4, Leaf 6), Node (Leaf 10, Node (Leaf 14, Leaf 22)))
 
 Here, our environment is the doubling function (`fun i -> i + i`).  If
-we apply the very same `int tree reader` (namely, `treemonadizer
-int2int_reader t1`) to a different `int -> int` function---say, the
+we apply the very same `int tree reader` (namely, `tree_monadize
+int_readerize t1`) to a different `int -> int` function---say, the
 squaring function, `fun i -> i * i`---we get an entirely different
 result:
 
-       # treemonadizer int2int_reader t1 (fun i -> i * i);;
+       # tree_monadize int_readerize t1 square;;
        - : int tree =
        Node (Node (Leaf 4, Leaf 9), Node (Leaf 25, Node (Leaf 49, Leaf 121)))
 
-Now that we have a tree transformer that accepts a reader monad as a
+Now that we have a tree transformer that accepts a *reader* monad as a
 parameter, we can see what it would take to swap in a different monad.
-For instance, we can use a state monad to count the number of nodes in
+
+For instance, we can use a state monad to count the number of leaves in
 the tree.
 
        type 'a state = int -> 'a * int;;
        let state_unit a = fun s -> (a, s);;
-       let state_bind_and_count u f = fun s -> let (a, s') = u s in f a (s' + 1);;
+       let state_bind u f = fun s -> let (a, s') = u s in f a s';;
 
-Gratifyingly, we can use the `treemonadizer` function without any
+Gratifyingly, we can use the `tree_monadize` function without any
 modification whatsoever, except for replacing the (parametric) type
 `'b reader` with `'b state`, and substituting in the appropriate unit and bind:
 
-       let rec treemonadizer (f : 'a -> 'b state) (t : 'a tree) : 'b tree state =
+       let rec tree_monadize (f : 'a -> 'b state) (t : 'a tree) : 'b tree state =
            match t with
-           | Leaf i -> state_bind_and_count (f i) (fun i' -> state_unit (Leaf i'))
-           | Node (l, r) -> state_bind_and_count (treemonadizer f l) (fun x ->
-                              state_bind_and_count (treemonadizer f r) (fun y ->
+           | Leaf i -> state_bind (f i) (fun i' -> state_unit (Leaf i'))
+           | Node (l, r) -> state_bind (tree_monadize f l) (fun x ->
+                              state_bind (tree_monadize f r) (fun y ->
                                 state_unit (Node (x, y))));;
 
-Then we can count the number of nodes in the tree:
+Then we can count the number of leaves in the tree:
 
-       # treemonadizer state_unit t1 0;;
+       # tree_monadize (fun a -> fun s -> (a, s+1)) t1 0;;
        - : int tree * int =
-       (Node (Node (Leaf 2, Leaf 3), Node (Leaf 5, Node (Leaf 7, Leaf 11))), 13)
+       (Node (Node (Leaf 2, Leaf 3), Node (Leaf 5, Node (Leaf 7, Leaf 11))), 5)
        
            .
         ___|___
@@ -196,22 +225,12 @@ Then we can count the number of nodes in the tree:
                |  |
                7  11
 
-Notice that we've counted each internal node twice---it's a good
-exercise to adjust the code to count each node once.
-
-<!--
-A tree with n leaves has 2n - 1 nodes.
-This function will currently return n*1 + (n-1)*2 = 3n - 2.
-To convert b = 3n - 2 into 2n - 1, we can use: let n = (b + 2)/3 in 2*n -1
-
-But I assume Chris means here, adjust the code so that no corrections of this sort have to be applied.
--->
-
+Why does this work? Because the operation `fun a -> fun s -> (a, s+1)` takes an `int` and wraps it in an `int state` monadic box that increments the state. When we give that same operations to our `tree_monadize` function, it then wraps an `int tree` in a box, one that does the same state-incrementing for each of its leaves.
 
 One more revealing example before getting down to business: replacing
-`state` everywhere in `treemonadizer` with `list` gives us
+`state` everywhere in `tree_monadize` with `list` gives us
 
-       # treemonadizer (fun i -> [ [i; square i] ]) t1;;
+       # tree_monadize (fun i -> [ [i; square i] ]) t1;;
        - : int list tree list =
        [Node
          (Node (Leaf [2; 4], Leaf [3; 9]),
@@ -219,10 +238,11 @@ One more revealing example before getting down to business: replacing
 
 Unlike the previous cases, instead of turning a tree into a function
 from some input to a result, this transformer replaces each `int` with
-a list of `int`'s.
+a list of `int`'s. We might also have done this with a Reader Monad, though then our environments would need to be of type `int -> int list`. Experiment with what happens if you supply the `tree_monadize` based on the List Monad an operation like `fun -> [ i; [2*i; 3*i] ]`. Use small trees for your experiment.
+
 
 <!--
-We don't make it clear why the fun has to be int -> int list list, instead of int -> int list
+FIXME: We don't make it clear why the fun has to be int -> int list list, instead of int -> int list
 -->
 
 
@@ -233,49 +253,50 @@ of leaves?
        let continuation_unit a = fun k -> k a;;
        let continuation_bind u f = fun k -> u (fun a -> f a k);;
        
-       let rec treemonadizer (f : 'a -> ('b, 'r) continuation) (t : 'a tree) : ('b tree, 'r) continuation =
+       let rec tree_monadize (f : 'a -> ('b, 'r) continuation) (t : 'a tree) : ('b tree, 'r) continuation =
            match t with
            | Leaf i -> continuation_bind (f i) (fun i' -> continuation_unit (Leaf i'))
-           | Node (l, r) -> continuation_bind (treemonadizer f l) (fun x ->
-                              continuation_bind (treemonadizer f r) (fun y ->
+           | Node (l, r) -> continuation_bind (tree_monadize f l) (fun x ->
+                              continuation_bind (tree_monadize f r) (fun y ->
                                 continuation_unit (Node (x, y))));;
 
 We use the continuation monad described above, and insert the
-`continuation` type in the appropriate place in the `treemonadizer` code.
-We then compute:
+`continuation` type in the appropriate place in the `tree_monadize` code. Then if we give the `tree_monadize` function an operation that converts `int`s into continuations expecting `'b` arguments, it will give us back a way to turn `int tree`s into continuations that expect `'b tree` arguments. The effect of giving the continuation such an argument will be to distribute across the `'b tree`'s leaves effects that parallel the effects that the `'b`-expecting continuations would have on their `'b`s.
+
+So for example, we compute:
 
-       # treemonadizer (fun a k -> a :: (k a)) t1 (fun t -> []);;
+       # tree_monadize (fun a -> fun k -> a :: (k a)) t1 (fun t -> []);;
        - : int list = [2; 3; 5; 7; 11]
 
-We have found a way of collapsing a tree into a list of its leaves.
+We have found a way of collapsing a tree into a list of its leaves. Can you trace how this is working?
 
 The continuation monad is amazingly flexible; we can use it to
 simulate some of the computations performed above.  To see how, first
-note that an interestingly uninteresting thing happens if we use the
-continuation unit as our first argument to `treemonadizer`, and then
+note that an interestingly uninteresting thing happens if we use
+`continuation_unit` as our first argument to `tree_monadize`, and then
 apply the result to the identity function:
 
-       # treemonadizer continuation_unit t1 (fun i -> i);;
+       # tree_monadize continuation_unit t1 (fun i -> i);;
        - : int tree =
        Node (Node (Leaf 2, Leaf 3), Node (Leaf 5, Node (Leaf 7, Leaf 11)))
 
 That is, nothing happens.  But we can begin to substitute more
-interesting functions for the first argument of `treemonadizer`:
+interesting functions for the first argument of `tree_monadize`:
 
        (* Simulating the tree reader: distributing a operation over the leaves *)
-       # treemonadizer (fun a k -> k (square a)) t1 (fun i -> i);;
+       # tree_monadize (fun a -> fun k -> k (square a)) t1 (fun i -> i);;
        - : int tree =
        Node (Node (Leaf 4, Leaf 9), Node (Leaf 25, Node (Leaf 49, Leaf 121)))
 
        (* Simulating the int list tree list *)
-       # treemonadizer (fun a k -> k [a; square a]) t1 (fun i -> i);;
+       # tree_monadize (fun a -> fun k -> k [a; square a]) t1 (fun i -> i);;
        - : int list tree =
        Node
         (Node (Leaf [2; 4], Leaf [3; 9]),
          Node (Leaf [5; 25], Node (Leaf [7; 49], Leaf [11; 121])))
 
        (* Counting leaves *)
-       # treemonadizer (fun a k -> 1 + k a) t1 (fun i -> 0);;
+       # tree_monadize (fun a -> fun k -> 1 + k a) t1 (fun i -> 0);;
        - : int = 5
 
 We could simulate the tree state example too, but it would require
@@ -283,6 +304,9 @@ generalizing the type of the continuation monad to
 
        type ('a, 'b, 'c) continuation = ('a -> 'b) -> 'c;;
 
+If you want to see how to parameterize the definition of the `tree_monadize` function, so that you don't have to keep rewriting it for each new monad, see [this code](/code/tree_monadize.ml).
+
+
 The binary tree monad
 ---------------------
 
@@ -332,7 +356,7 @@ falls out once we realize that
 
 As for the associative law,
 
-       Associativity: bind (bind u f) g = bind u (\a. bind (fa) g)
+       Associativity: bind (bind u f) g = bind u (\a. bind (f a) g)
 
 we'll give an example that will show how an inductive proof would
 proceed.  Let `f a = Node (Leaf a, Leaf a)`.  Then