cat theory ready
[lambda.git] / intensionality_monad.mdwn
index 83824a4..5b0ec3a 100644 (file)
@@ -24,11 +24,11 @@ First, the familiar linguistic problem:
           Ann believes [Bill left].
           Ann believes [Cam left].
 
           Ann believes [Bill left].
           Ann believes [Cam left].
 
-We want an analysis on which all four of these sentences can be true
-simultaneously.  If sentences denoted simple truth values or booleans,
-we have a problem: if the sentences *Bill left* and *Cam left* are
-both true, they denote the same object, and Ann's beliefs can't
-distinguish between them.
+We want an analysis on which the first three sentences can be true at
+the same time that the last sentence is false.  If sentences denoted
+simple truth values or booleans, we have a problem: if the sentences
+*Bill left* and *Cam left* are both true, they denote the same object,
+and Ann's beliefs can't distinguish between them.
 
 The traditional solution to the problem sketched above is to allow
 sentences to denote a function from worlds to truth values, what
 
 The traditional solution to the problem sketched above is to allow
 sentences to denote a function from worlds to truth values, what
@@ -143,7 +143,7 @@ matter which world is used as an argument.  This is a typical kind of
 thing for a monad unit to do.
 
 Then combining a prediction like *left* which is extensional in its
 thing for a monad unit to do.
 
 Then combining a prediction like *left* which is extensional in its
-subject argument with a monadic subject like `unit ann` is simply bind
+subject argument with an intensional subject like `unit ann` is simply bind
 in action:
 
     bind (unit ann) left 1;; (* true: Ann left in world 1 *)
 in action:
 
     bind (unit ann) left 1;; (* true: Ann left in world 1 *)