Added assignmemnt 6
[lambda.git] / intensionality_monad.mdwn
index e228e24..44bcaa5 100644 (file)
@@ -1,15 +1,10 @@
-The intensionality monad
-------------------------
-In the meantime, we'll look at several linguistic applications for monads, based
-on
-
-what's called the *reader monad*.
-...
-intensional function application.  In Shan (2001) [Monads for natural
+Now we'll look at using monads to do intensional function application.
+This really is just another application of the reader monad, not a new monad.
+In Shan (2001) [Monads for natural
 language semantics](http://arxiv.org/abs/cs/0205026v1), Ken shows that
-making expressions sensitive to the world of evaluation is
-conceptually the same thing as making use of a *reader monad* (which
-we'll see again soon).  This technique was beautifully re-invented
+making expressions sensitive to the world of evaluation is conceptually
+the same thing as making use of the reader monad.
+This technique was beautifully re-invented
 by Ben-Avi and Winter (2007) in their paper [A modular
 approach to
 intensionality](http://parles.upf.es/glif/pub/sub11/individual/bena_wint.pdf),
@@ -22,39 +17,40 @@ To run it, download the file, start OCaml, and say
 
 Note the extra `#` attached to the directive `use`.
 
-Here's the idea: since people can have different attitudes towards
-different propositions that happen to have the same truth value, we
-can't have sentences denoting simple truth values.  If we did, then if John
-believed that the earth was round, it would force him to believe
-Fermat's last theorem holds, since both propositions are equally true.
-The traditional solution is to allow sentences to denote a function
-from worlds to truth values, what Montague called an intension.  
-So if `s` is the type of possible worlds, we have the following
-situation:
+First, the familiar linguistic problem:
+
+           Bill left.  
+          Cam left.
+          Ann believes [Bill left].
+          Ann believes [Cam left].
+
+We want an analysis on which all four of these sentences can be true
+simultaneously.  If sentences denoted simple truth values or booleans,
+we have a problem: if the sentences *Bill left* and *Cam left* are
+both true, they denote the same object, and Ann's beliefs can't
+distinguish between them.
+
+The traditional solution to the problem sketched above is to allow
+sentences to denote a function from worlds to truth values, what
+Montague called an intension.  So if `s` is the type of possible
+worlds, we have the following situation:
 
 
 <pre>
-Extensional types                 Intensional types       Examples
+Extensional types              Intensional types       Examples
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
 
-S         s->t                    s->t                    John left
-DP        s->e                    s->e                    John
-VP        s->e->t                 s->(s->e)->t            left
-Vt        s->e->e->t              s->(s->e)->(s->e)->t    saw
-Vs        s->t->e->t              s->(s->t)->(s->e)->t    thought
+S         t                    s->t                    John left
+DP        e                    s->e                    John
+VP        e->t                 (s->e)->s->t            left
+Vt        e->e->t              (s->e)->(s->e)->s->t    saw
+Vs        t->e->t              (s->t)->(s->e)->s->t    thought
 </pre>
 
 This system is modeled on the way Montague arranged his grammar.
 There are significant simplifications: for instance, determiner
 phrases are thought of as corresponding to individuals rather than to
-generalized quantifiers.  If you're curious about the initial `s`'s
-in the extensional types, they're there because the behavior of these
-expressions depends on which world they're evaluated at.  If you are
-in a situation in which you can hold the evaluation world constant,
-you can further simplify the extensional types.  Usually, the
-dependence of the extension of an expression on the evaluation world
-is hidden in a superscript, or built into the lexical interpretation
-function.
+generalized quantifiers.  
 
 The main difference between the intensional types and the extensional
 types is that in the intensional types, the arguments are functions
@@ -62,15 +58,22 @@ from worlds to extensions: intransitive verb phrases like "left" now
 take intensional concepts as arguments (type s->e) rather than plain
 individuals (type e), and attitude verbs like "think" now take
 propositions (type s->t) rather than truth values (type t).
+In addition, the result of each predicate is an intension.
+This expresses the fact that the set of people who left in one world
+may be different than the set of people who left in a different world.
+Normally, the dependence of the extension of a predicate to the world
+of evaluation is hidden inside of an evaluation coordinate, or built
+into the the lexical meaning function, but we've made it explicit here
+in the way that the intensionality monad makes most natural.
 
 The intenstional types are more complicated than the intensional
-types.  Wouldn't it be nice to keep the complicated types to just
-those attitude verbs that need to worry about intensions, and keep the
-rest of the grammar as extensional as possible?  This desire is
-parallel to our earlier desire to limit the concern about division by
-zero to the division function, and let the other functions, like
-addition or multiplication, ignore division-by-zero problems as much
-as possible.
+types.  Wouldn't it be nice to make the complicated types available
+for those expressions like attitude verbs that need to worry about
+intensions, and keep the rest of the grammar as extensional as
+possible?  This desire is parallel to our earlier desire to limit the
+concern about division by zero to the division function, and let the
+other functions, like addition or multiplication, ignore
+division-by-zero problems as much as possible.
 
 So here's what we do:
 
@@ -84,144 +87,114 @@ Characters (characters in the computational sense, i.e., letters like
 `'a'` and `'b'`, not Kaplanian characters) will model individuals, and
 OCaml booleans will serve for truth values.
 
-       type 'a intension = s -> 'a;;
-       let unit x (w:s) = x;;
-
-       let ann = unit 'a';;
-       let bill = unit 'b';;
-       let cam = unit 'c';;
-
-In our monad, the intension of an extensional type `'a` is `s -> 'a`,
-a function from worlds to extensions.  Our unit will be the constant
-function (an instance of the K combinator) that returns the same
-individual at each world.
-
-Then `ann = unit 'a'` is a rigid designator: a constant function from
-worlds to individuals that returns `'a'` no matter which world is used
-as an argument.
-
-Let's test compliance with the left identity law:
-
-       # let bind u f (w:s) = f (u w) w;;
-       val bind : (s -> 'a) -> ('a -> s -> 'b) -> s -> 'b = <fun>
-       # bind (unit 'a') unit 1;;
-       - : char = 'a'
+<pre>
+let ann = 'a';;
+let bill = 'b';;
+let cam = 'c';;
 
-We'll assume that this and the other laws always hold.
+let left1 (x:e) = true;; 
+let saw1 (x:e) (y:e) = y < x;; 
 
-We now build up some extensional meanings:
+left1 ann;;
+saw1 bill ann;; (* true *)
+saw1 ann bill;; (* false *)
+</pre>
 
-       let left w x = match (w,x) with (2,'c') -> false | _ -> true;;
+So here's our extensional system: everyone left, including Ann;
+and Ann saw Bill, but Bill didn't see Ann.  (Note that Ocaml word
+order is VOS, verb-object-subject.)
 
-This function says that everyone always left, except for Cam in world
-2 (i.e., `left 2 'c' == false`).
+Now we add intensions.  Because different people leave in different
+worlds, the meaning of *leave* must depend on the world in which it is
+being evaluated:
 
-Then the way to evaluate an extensional sentence is to determine the
-extension of the verb phrase, and then apply that extension to the
-extension of the subject:
+    let left (x:e) (w:s) = match (x, w) with ('c', 2) -> false | _ -> true;;
 
-       let extapp fn arg w = fn w (arg w);;
+This new definition says that everyone always left, except that 
+in world 2, Cam didn't leave.
 
-       extapp left ann 1;;
-       # - : bool = true
+    let saw x y w = (w < 2) && (y < x);;
+    saw bill ann 1;; (* true: Ann saw Bill in world 1 *)
+    saw bill ann 2;; (* false: no one saw anyone in world 2 *)
 
-       extapp left cam 2;;
-       # - : bool = false
+Along similar lines, this general version of *see* coincides with the
+`saw1` function we defined above for world 1; in world 2, no one saw anyone.
 
-`extapp` stands for "extensional function application".
-So Ann left in world 1, but Cam didn't leave in world 2.
+Just to keep things straight, let's get the facts of the world set:
 
-A transitive predicate:
+<pre>
+     World 1: Everyone left.
+              Ann saw Bill, Ann saw Cam, Bill saw Cam, no one else saw anyone.              
+     World 2: Ann left, Bill left, Cam didn't leave.
+              No one saw anyone.
+</pre>
 
-       let saw w x y = (w < 2) && (y < x);;
-       extapp (extapp saw bill) ann 1;; (* true *)
-       extapp (extapp saw bill) ann 2;; (* false *)
+Now we are ready for the intensionality monad:
 
-In world 1, Ann saw Bill and Cam, and Bill saw Cam.  No one saw anyone
-in world two.
+<pre>
+type 'a intension = s -> 'a;;
+let unit x (w:s) = x;;
+let bind m f (w:s) = f (m w) w;;
+</pre>
 
-Good.  Now for intensions:
+Then the individual concept `unit ann` is a rigid designator: a
+constant function from worlds to individuals that returns `'a'` no
+matter which world is used as an argument.  This is a typical kind of
+thing for a monad unit to do.
 
-       let intapp fn arg w = fn w arg;;
+Then combining a prediction like *left* which is extensional in its
+subject argument with a monadic subject like `unit ann` is simply bind
+in action:
 
-The only difference between intensional application and extensional
-application is that we don't feed the evaluation world to the argument.
-(See Montague's rules of (intensional) functional application, T4 -- T10.)
-In other words, instead of taking an extension as an argument,
-Montague's predicates take a full-blown intension.  
+    bind (unit ann) left 1;; (* true: Ann left in world 1 *)
+    bind (unit cam) left 2;; (* false: Cam didn't leave in world 2 *)
 
-But for so-called extensional predicates like "left" and "saw", 
-the extra power is not used.  We'd like to define intensional versions
-of these predicates that depend only on their extensional essence.
-Just as we used bind to define a version of addition that interacted
-with the option monad, we now use bind to intensionalize an
-extensional verb:
+As usual, bind takes a monad box containing Ann, extracts Ann, and
+feeds her to the extensional *left*.  In linguistic terms, we take the
+individual concept `unit ann`, apply it to the world of evaluation in
+order to get hold of an individual (`'a'`), then feed that individual
+to the extensional predicate *left*.
 
-       let lift pred w arg = bind arg (fun x w -> pred w x) w;;
+We can arrange for an extensional transitive verb to take intensional
+arguments:
 
-       intapp (lift left) ann 1;; (* true: Ann still left in world 1 *)
-       intapp (lift left) cam 2;; (* false: Cam still didn't leave in world 2 *)
+    let lift f u v = bind u (fun x -> bind v (fun y -> f x y));;
 
-Because `bind` unwraps the intensionality of the argument, when the
-lifted "left" receives an individual concept (e.g., `unit 'a'`) as
-argument, it's the extension of the individual concept (i.e., `'a'`)
-that gets fed to the basic extensional version of "left".  (For those
-of you who know Montague's PTQ, this use of bind captures Montague's
-third meaning postulate.)
+This is the exact same lift predicate we defined in order to allow
+addition in our division monad example.
 
-Likewise for extensional transitive predicates like "saw":
+<pre>
+lift saw (unit bill) (unit ann) 1;;  (* true *)
+lift saw (unit bill) (unit ann) 2;;  (* false *)
+</pre>
 
-       let lift2 pred w arg1 arg2 = 
-         bind arg1 (fun x -> bind arg2 (fun y w -> pred w x y)) w;;
-       intapp (intapp (lift2 saw) bill) ann 1;;  (* true: Ann saw Bill in world 1 *)
-       intapp (intapp (lift2 saw) bill) ann 2;;  (* false: No one saw anyone in world 2 *)
+Ann did see bill in world 1, but Ann didn't see Bill in world 2.
 
-Crucially, an intensional predicate does not use `bind` to consume its
-arguments.  Attitude verbs like "thought" are intensional with respect
-to their sentential complement, but extensional with respect to their
-subject (as Montague noticed, almost all verbs in English are
-extensional with respect to their subject; a possible exception is "appear"):
+Finally, we can define our intensional verb *thinks*.  *Think* is
+intensional with respect to its sentential complement, but extensional
+with respect to its subject.  (As Montague noticed, almost all verbs
+in English are extensional with respect to their subject; a possible
+exception is "appear".)
 
-       let think (w:s) (p:s->t) (x:e) = 
-         match (x, p 2) with ('a', false) -> false | _ -> p w;;
+    let thinks (p:s->t) (x:e) (w:s) = 
+      match (x, p 2) with ('a', false) -> false | _ -> p w;;
 
 Ann disbelieves any proposition that is false in world 2.  Apparently,
 she firmly believes we're in world 2.  Everyone else believes a
 proposition iff that proposition is true in the world of evaluation.
 
-       intapp (lift (intapp think
-                                                (intapp (lift left)
-                                                                (unit 'b'))))
-                  (unit 'a') 
-       1;; (* true *)
+    bind (unit ann) (thinks (bind (unit bill) left)) 1;;
 
 So in world 1, Ann thinks that Bill left (because in world 2, Bill did leave).
 
-The `lift` is there because "think Bill left" is extensional wrt its
-subject.  The important bit is that "think" takes the intension of
-"Bill left" as its first argument.
-
-       intapp (lift (intapp think
-                                                (intapp (lift left)
-                                                                (unit 'c'))))
-                  (unit 'a') 
-       1;; (* false *)
+    bind (unit ann) (thinks (bind (unit cam) left)) 1;;
 
 But even in world 1, Ann doesn't believe that Cam left (even though he
-did: `intapp (lift left) cam 1 == true`).  Ann's thoughts are hung up
-on what is happening in world 2, where Cam doesn't leave.
+did: `bind (unit cam) left 1 == true`).  Ann's thoughts are hung up on
+what is happening in world 2, where Cam doesn't leave.
 
 *Small project*: add intersective ("red") and non-intersective
  adjectives ("good") to the fragment.  The intersective adjectives
  will be extensional with respect to the nominal they combine with
  (using bind), and the non-intersective adjectives will take
  intensional arguments.
-
-Finally, note that within an intensional grammar, extensional funtion
-application is essentially just bind:
-
-       # let swap f x y = f y x;;
-       # bind cam (swap left) 2;;
-       - : bool = false
-
-