week9 expand
[lambda.git] / index.mdwn
index e0e0fc1..90cb2a9 100644 (file)
@@ -2,21 +2,88 @@
 
 or: **What Philosophers and Linguists Can Learn From Theoretical Computer Science But Didn't Know To Ask**
 
-This course will be co-taught by [Chris Barker](http://homepages.nyu.edu/~cb125/) and [Jim Pryor](http://www.jimpryor.net/). Linguistics calls it "G61.3340-002" and Philosophy calls it "G83.2296-001."
-
+This course is co-taught by [Chris Barker](http://homepages.nyu.edu/~cb125/) and [Jim Pryor](http://www.jimpryor.net/). Linguistics calls it "G61.3340-002" and Philosophy calls it "G83.2296-001."
+The seminar meets on Mondays from 4-6, in 
+the Linguistics building at 10 Washington Place, in room 104 (back of the first floor).
+One student session will be held every Wednesday from 3-4 on the
+fourth floor at 10 Washington Place.
 
 ## Announcements ##
 
-The seminar meets on Mondays, starting September 13, from 4-6.
-The first meeting will be in the Linguistics building at 10 Washington Place on the first floor (room 104).
-(Earlier, we were going to meet in the 2nd floor Philosophy Seminar Room, at 5
-Washington Place, but there were conflicts.)  We may be able to shift the time around slightly to suit the
-schedule of participants; but it will remain on Mondays late
-afternoon/evenings.
+* This is the time of the semester when some people start slipping
+  behind with the homework.  Don't.
+
+[[Older Announcements]]
+
+##[[Lambda Evaluator]]##
+
+Usable in your browser. It can help you check whether your answer to some of
+the homework questions works correctly.
+
+There is also now a [library](/lambda_library) of lambda-calculus
+arithmetical and list operations, some relatively advanced.
+
+
+## Lecture Notes and Assignments ##
+
+(13 Sept) Lecture notes for [[Week1]]; [[Assignment1]].
+
+>      Topics: [[Applications]], including [[Damn]]; Basics of Lambda Calculus; Comparing Different Languages
+
+(20 Sept) Lecture notes for [[Week2]]; [[Assignment2]].
+
+>      Topics: Reduction and Convertibility; Combinators; Evaluation Strategies and Normalization; Decidability; [[Lists and Numbers]]
+
+(27 Sept) Lecture notes for [[Week3]];  [[Assignment3]];
+an evaluator with the definitions used for homework 3
+preloaded is available at [[assignment 3 evaluator]].
+
+>      Topics: [[Evaluation Order]]; Recursion with Fixed Point Combinators
+
+(4 Oct) Lecture notes for [[Week4]]; [[Assignment4]].
+
+>      Topics: More on Fixed Points; Sets; Aborting List Traversals; [[Implementing Trees]]
+
+
+(18 Oct, 25 Oct) Lecture notes for [[Week5]] and [[Week6]]; [[Assignment5]].
+
+>      Topics: Types, Polymorphism, Unit and Bottom
+
+(1 Nov) Lecture notes for [[Week7]]; [[Assignment6]].
+
+>      Topics: Monads; [[Reader Monad for Variable Binding]]; [[Reader Monad for Intensionality]]
+
+(8 Nov) Lecture notes for [[Week8]].
+
+>      Topics: Reader Monad for Jacobson's Variable-Free Semantics
+
+(15 Nov) Lecture notes for [[Week9]] (these are being dynamically updated, how fitting); [[Assignment7]] is already ready. Everyone auditing in the class is encouraged to do this assignment, or at least work through the substantial "hints".
+
+>      Topics: Mutable Variables; Passing by Reference
 
 
+[[Upcoming topics]]
 
-## Overview ##
+[[Advanced Topics]]
+
+>      Topics: Version 4 lists, Monads in Category Theory
+
+##Scheme and OCaml##
+
+See [below](#installing) for how to get the programming languages running on your computer.
+
+*      Links for help [[learning Scheme]]
+
+*      Links for help [[learning OCaml]]
+
+
+##[[Offsite Reading]]##
+
+There's lots of links here already to tutorials and encyclopedia entries about many of the notions we'll be dealing with.
+
+
+
+## Course Overview ##
 
 The goal of this seminar is to introduce concepts and techniques from
 theoretical computer science and show how they can provide insight
@@ -118,7 +185,7 @@ and Caml, which are prominent *functional programming languages*. We'll explain
 what that means during the course.
 
 *      **Scheme** is one of two major dialects of *Lisp*, which is a large family
-of programming languages. The other dialect is called "CommonLisp." Scheme
+of programming languages. Scheme
 is the more clean and minimalistic dialect, and is what's mostly used in
 academic circles.
 Scheme itself has umpteen different "implementations", which share most of
@@ -128,9 +195,10 @@ PLT Scheme, and has just in the past few weeks changed their name to Racket.
 This is what we recommend you use. (If you're already using or comfortable with
 another Scheme implementation, though, there's no compelling reason to switch.)
 
+       Racket stands to Scheme in something like the relation Firefox stands to HTML.
+
 *      **Caml** is one of two major dialects of *ML*, which is another large
-family of programming languages. The other dialect is called "SML" and has
-several implementations. But Caml has only one active implementation,
+family of programming languages. Caml has only one active implementation,
 OCaml, developed by the INRIA academic group in France.
 
 *      Those of you with some programming background may have encountered a third
@@ -142,25 +210,28 @@ other. But these languages also have a lot in common, and if you're
 familiar with one of them, it's not difficult to move between it and the
 other.
 
+<a name=installing></a>
 [[How to get the programming languages running on your computer]]
 
-[[Using the programming languages]]
-
 [[Family tree of functional programming languages]]
 
+
 ## Recommended Books ##
 
+It's not necessary to purchase these for the class. But they are good ways to get a more thorough and solid understanding of some of the more basic conceptual tools we'll be using.
+
 *      *An Introduction to Lambda Calculi for Computer Scientists*, by Chris
 Hankin, currently $17 on
-[Amazon](http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Lambda-Calculi-Computer-Scientists/dp/0954300653).
+[Amazon](http://www.amazon.com/dp/0954300653).
 
 *      (Another good book covering the same ground as the Hankin book, but
 more thoroughly, and in a more mathematical style, is *Lambda-Calculus and Combinators:
-an Introduction*, by J. Roger Hindley and Jonathan P. Seldin. If you choose to read
+an Introduction*, by J. Roger Hindley and Jonathan P. Seldin, currently $52 on [Amazon](http://www.amazon.com/dp/0521898854). If you choose to read
 both the Hankin book and this book, you'll notice the authors made some different
 terminological/notational choices. At first, this makes comprehension slightly slower,
 but in the long run it's helpful because it makes the arbitrariness of those choices more salient.)
 
+*      (Another good book, covering some of the same ground as the previous two, but also delving much deeper into typed lambda calculi, is *Types and Programming Languages*, by Benjamin Pierce, currently $61 on [Amazon](http://www.amazon.com/dp/0262162091). This book has many examples in OCaml.)
 
 *   *The Little Schemer, Fourth Edition*, by Daniel P. Friedman and Matthias
 Felleisen, currently $23 on [Amazon](http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0262560992).
@@ -177,17 +248,10 @@ on [Amazon](http://www.amazon.com/Seasoned-Schemer-Daniel-P-Friedman/dp/02625610
 *      *The Little MLer*, by Matthias Felleisen and Daniel P. Friedman, currently $27
 on [Amazon](http://www.amazon.com/Little-MLer-Matthias-Felleisen/dp/026256114X).
 This covers some of the same introductory ground as The Little Schemer, but
-this time in ML. The dialect of ML used is SML, not OCaml, but there are only
+this time in ML. It uses another dialect of ML (called SML), instead of OCaml, but there are only
 superficial syntactic differences between these languages. [Here's a translation
 manual between them](http://www.mpi-sws.org/~rossberg/sml-vs-ocaml.html).
 
-##[[Schedule of Topics]]##
-
-##[[Lecture Notes]]##
-
-##[[Offsite Reading]]##
-
-There's lots of links here already to tutorials and encyclopedia entries about many of the notions we'll be dealing with.
 
 
 ----
@@ -195,3 +259,5 @@ There's lots of links here already to tutorials and encyclopedia entries about m
 All wikis are supposed to have a [[SandBox]], so this one does too.
 
 This wiki is powered by [[ikiwiki]].
+
+