ass 6
[lambda.git] / exercises / assignment5.mdwn
index 00ede5a..7388948 100644 (file)
@@ -329,9 +329,7 @@ any type `α`, as long as your function is of type `α -> α` and you have a bas
         -- Or this:
         let sysf_true = (\y n -> y) :: Sysf_bool a
 
-    Note that in both OCaml and the Haskell code, the generalization `∀'a` on the free type variable `'a` is implicit. If you really want to, you can supply it explicitly in Haskell by saying:
-
-        :set -XExplicitForAll
+            :set -XExplicitForAll
         let { sysf_true :: forall a. Sysf_bool a; ... }
         -- or
         let { sysf_true :: forall a. a -> a -> a; ... }
@@ -384,7 +382,7 @@ Yet we haven't given ourselves the capacity to talk about `list [S]` and so on a
     = λf:T -> S. λxs:list. xs [T] [list [S]] (λx:T. λys:list [S]. cons [S] (f x) ys) (nil [S])
 -->
 
-*Update: Never mind, don't bother with the next three questions. They proved to be more difficult to implement in OCaml than we expected. Here is [[some explanation|assignment5 hint3]].*
+*Update: Never mind, don't bother with the next three questions. They proved to be more difficult to implement in OCaml than we expected. Here is [[some explanation|assignment5 hint4]].*
 
 19. Convert this list encoding and the `map` function to OCaml or Haskell. Again, call the type `sysf_list`, and the functions `sysf_nil`, `sysf_cons`, and `sysf_map`, to avoid collision with the names for native lists and functions in these languages. (In OCaml and Haskell you *can* say `('t) sysf_list` or `Sysf_list t`.)
 
@@ -408,7 +406,7 @@ Be sure to test your proposals with simple lists. (You'll have to `sysf_cons` up
         # k 1 true ;;
         - : int = 1
 
-    If you can't understand how one term can have several types, recall our discussion in this week's notes of "principal types". (WHERE?)
+    If you can't understand how one term can have several types, recall our discussion in this week's notes of "principal types".