extract closures discussion to separate page
[lambda.git] / exercises / assignment1.mdwn
index ea8f251..2543ff1 100644 (file)
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@
                                       in (ys, zs)
         in split
 
-    However, we want you to instead write this function from scratch.
+    However, we want you to instead write this function from scratch. The method displayed above would traverse the sequence (at least, its first `n` members) *twice*. Can you do it in a way that only traverses (that part of the) sequence once?
 
 7.  Write a function `filter` that expects two arguments. The second argument will be a sequence `xs` with elements of some type *t*, for example numbers. The first argument will be a function `p` that itself expects arguments of type *t* and returns `'true` or `'false`. What `filter` should return is a sequence that contains exactly those members of `xs` for which `p` returned `'true`. For example, helping ourself to a function `odd?` that works as you'd expect:
 
 
 *   In class I mentioned a function `&&` which occupied the position *between* its arguments, rather than coming before them (this is called an "infix" function). The way that it works is that `[1, 2, 3] && [4, 5]` evaluates to `[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]`. Define this function, making use of `letrec` and the simpler infix operation `&`.
 
-*   Write a function `unmap2` that is something like the inverse of `map2`. This function expects two arguments, the second being a sequence of elements of some type *t*. The first is a function `g` that expects a single argument of type *t* and returns a *pair* of results, rather than just one result. We want to collate these results, the first into one list, and the second into a different list. Then `unmap2` should return those two lists. Thus if:
+*   Write a function `unmap2` that is something like the inverse of `map2`. This function expects two arguments, the second being a sequence of elements of some type *t*. The first is a function `g` that expects a single argument of type *t* and returns a *pair* of results, rather than just one result. We want to collate these results, the first into one sequence, and the second into a different sequence. Then `unmap2` should return those two sequences. Thus if:
 
-        g z1  # evaluates to [x1, y1]
-        g z2  # evaluates to [x2, y2]
-        g z3  # evaluates to [x3, y3]
+        g z1  # evaluates to (x1, y1)
+        g z2  # evaluates to (x2, y2)
+        g z3  # evaluates to (x3, y3)
 
     Then `unmap2 (g, [z1, z2, z3])` should evaluate to `([x1, x2, x3], [y1, y2, y3])`.
 
 
         takewhile ((lambda x. x < 10), [1, 2, 20, 4, 40]) # evaluates to [1, 2]
 
-    Note that we stop "taking" once we reach `20`, even though there are still later elements in the list that are less than `10`.
+    Note that we stop "taking" once we reach `20`, even though there are still later elements in the sequence that are less than `10`.
 
 *   Write a function `dropwhile` that expects a `p` argument like `filter`, and also a sequence. The result should behave like this:
 
         dropwhile ((lambda x. x < 10), [1, 2, 20, 4, 40]) # evaluates to [20, 4, 40]
 
-    Note that we stop "dropping" once we reach `20`, even though there are still later elements in the list that are less than `10`.
+    Note that we stop "dropping" once we reach `20`, even though there are still later elements in the sequence that are less than `10`.
 
 *   Write a function `reverse` that returns the reverse of a sequence. Thus, `reverse [1, 2, 3, 4]` should evaluate to `[4, 3, 2, 1]`.