add zipper
[lambda.git] / assignment5.mdwn
index 85ac9a1..f402ec6 100644 (file)
@@ -13,9 +13,9 @@ Types and OCaml
                - : int = 1
 
 
-1.     Which of the following expressions is well-typed in OCaml?  
-       For those that are, give the type of the expression as a whole.
-       For those that are not, why not?
+1.     Which of the following expressions is well-typed in OCaml? For those that
+       are, give the type of the expression as a whole. For those that are not, why
+       not?
 
                let rec f x = f x;;
 
@@ -121,97 +121,132 @@ and that "bool" is any boolean.  Then we can try the following:
        or of `match`.  That is, you must keep the `let` statements, though
        you're allowed to adjust what `b`, `y`, and `n` get assigned to.
 
-       [[Hint assignment 5 problem 3]]
+       [[hints/assignment 5 hint 1]]
 
-Booleans, Church numbers, and Church lists in OCaml
----------------------------------------------------
+Booleans, Church numerals, and v3 lists in OCaml
+------------------------------------------------
 
-(These questions adapted from web materials by Umut Acar. See <http://www.mpi-sws.org/~umut/>.)
+(These questions adapted from web materials by Umut Acar. See
+<http://www.mpi-sws.org/~umut/>.)
 
-The idea is to get booleans, Church numbers, v3 lists, and
-binary trees working in OCaml.
+Let's think about the encodings of booleans, numerals and lists in System F,
+and get data-structures with the same form working in OCaml. (Of course, OCaml
+has *native* versions of these datas-structures: its `true`, `1`, and `[1;2;3]`.
+But the point of our exercise requires that we ignore those.)
 
 Recall from class System F, or the polymorphic λ-calculus.
 
-       τ ::= α | τ1 → τ2 | ∀α. τ
-       e ::= x | λx:τ. e | e1 e2 | Λα. e | e [τ ]
+       types τ ::= c | 'a | τ1 → τ2 | ∀'a. τ
+       expressions e ::= x | λx:τ. e | e1 e2 | Λ'a. e | e [τ]
 
-Recall that bool may be encoded as follows:
+The boolean type, and its two values, may be encoded as follows:
 
-       bool := ∀α. α → α → α
-       true := Λα. λt:α. λf :α. t
-       false := Λα. λt:α. λf :α. f
+       bool := ∀'a. 'a → 'a → 'a
+       true := Λ'a. λt:'a. λf :'a. t
+       false := Λ'a. λt:'a. λf :'a. f
 
-(where τ indicates the type of e1 and e2)
+It's used like this:
 
-Note that each of the following terms, when applied to the
-appropriate arguments, return a result of type bool.
+       b [τ] e1 e2
+
+where b is a boolean value, and τ is the shared type of e1 and e2.
+
+**Exercise**. How should we implement the following terms. Note that the result
+of applying them to the appropriate arguments should also give us a term of
+type bool.
 
 (a) the term not that takes an argument of type bool and computes its negation;
 (b) the term and that takes two arguments of type bool and computes their conjunction;
 (c) the term or that takes two arguments of type bool and computes their disjunction.
 
+
 The type nat (for "natural number") may be encoded as follows:
 
-       nat := ∀α. α → (α → α) → α
-       zero := Λα. λz:α. λs:α → α. z
-       succ := λn:nat. Λα. λz:α. λs:α → α. s (n [α] z s)
+       nat := ∀'a. 'a → ('a → 'a) → 'a
+       zero := Λ'a. λz:'a. λs:'a → 'a. z
+       succ := λn:nat. Λ'a. λz:'a. λs:'a → 'a. s (n ['a] z s)
 
-A nat n is defined by what it can do, which is to compute a function iterated n times. In the polymorphic
-encoding above, the result of that iteration can be any type α, as long as you have a base element z : α and
-a function s : α → α.
+A nat n is defined by what it can do, which is to compute a function iterated n
+times. In the polymorphic encoding above, the result of that iteration can be
+any type 'a, as long as you have a base element z : 'a and a function s : 'a → 'a.
 
-**Excercise**: get booleans and Church numbers working in OCaml,
-including OCaml versions of bool, true, false, zero, succ, add.
+**Exercise**: get booleans and Church numbers working in OCaml,
+including OCaml versions of bool, true, false, zero, iszero, succ, and pred.
+It's especially useful to do a version of pred, starting with one
+of the (untyped) versions available in the lambda library
+accessible from the main wiki page.  The point of the excercise
+is to do these things on your own, so avoid using the built-in
+OCaml booleans and integers.
 
 Consider the following list type:
 
-       type ’a list = Nil | Cons of ’a * ’a list
+       type 'a list = Nil | Cons of 'a * 'a list
 
 We can encode τ lists, lists of elements of type τ as follows:
 
-       τ list := ∀α. α → (τ → α → α) → α
-       nilτ := Λα. λn:α. λc:τ → α → α. n
-       makeListτ := λh:τ. λt:τ list. Λα. λn:α. λc:τ → α → α. c h (t [α] n c)
+       τ list := ∀'a. 'a → (τ → 'a → 'a) → 'a
+       nil τ := Λ'a. λn:'a. λc:τ → 'a → 'a. n
+       make_list τ := λh:τ. λt:τ list. Λ'a. λn:'a. λc:τ → 'a → 'a. c h (t ['a] n c)
+
+More generally, the polymorphic list type is:
+
+       list := ∀'b. ∀'a. 'a → ('b → 'a → 'a) → 'a
 
 As with nats, recursion is built into the datatype.
 
 We can write functions like map:
 
        map : (σ → τ ) → σ list → τ list
-               = λf :σ → τ. λl:σ list. l [τ list] nilτ (λx:σ. λy:τ list. consτ (f x) y
 
-**Excercise** convert this function to OCaml.  Also write an `append` function.
-Test with simple lists.
+<!--
+               = λf :σ → τ. λl:σ list. l [τ list] nil τ (λx:σ. λy:τ list. make_list τ (f x) y
+-->
 
+**Excercise** convert this function to OCaml. We've given you the type; you
+only need to give the term.
+
+Also give us the type and definition for a `head` function. Think about what
+value to give back if the argument is the empty list.  Ultimately, we might
+want to make use of our `'a option` technique, but for this assignment, just
+pick a strategy, no matter how clunky. 
+
+Be sure to test your proposals with simple lists. (You'll have to `make_list`
+the lists yourself; don't expect OCaml to magically translate between its
+native lists and the ones you buil.d)
+
+
+<!--
 Consider the following simple binary tree type:
 
-       type ’a tree = Leaf | Node of ’a tree * ’a * ’a tree
+       type 'a tree = Leaf | Node of 'a tree * 'a * 'a tree
 
 **Excercise**
-Write a function `sumLeaves` that computes the sum of all the
-leaves in an int tree.
+Write a function `sum_leaves` that computes the sum of all the leaves in an int
+tree.
+
+Write a function `in_order` : τ tree → τ list that computes the in-order
+traversal of a binary tree. You may assume the above encoding of lists; define
+any auxiliary functions you need.
+-->
 
-Write a function `inOrder` : τ tree → τ list that computes the in-order traversal of a binary tree. You
-may assume the above encoding of lists; define any auxiliary functions you need.
 
 Baby monads
 -----------
 
-Read the lecture notes for week 6, then write a
-function `lift'` that generalized the correspondence between + and
-`add'`: that is, `lift'` takes any two-place operation on integers
-and returns a version that takes arguments of type `int option`
-instead, returning a result of `int option`.  In other words,
-`lift'` will have type
+Read the material on dividing by zero/towards monads from <strike>the end of lecture
+notes for week 6</strike> the start of lecture notes for week 7, then write a function `lift'` that generalized the
+correspondence between + and `add'`: that is, `lift'` takes any two-place
+operation on integers and returns a version that takes arguments of type `int
+option` instead, returning a result of `int option`.  In other words, `lift'`
+will have type:
 
        (int -> int -> int) -> (int option) -> (int option) -> (int option)
 
-so that `lift' (+) (Some 3) (Some 4)` will evalute to `Some 7`.  
+so that `lift' (+) (Some 3) (Some 4)` will evalute to `Some 7`.
 Don't worry about why you need to put `+` inside of parentheses.
 You should make use of `bind'` in your definition of `lift'`:
 
-       let bind' (x: int option) (f: int -> (int option)) =
-               match x with None -> None | Some n -> f n;;
+       let bind' (u: int option) (f: int -> (int option)) =
+               match u with None -> None | Some x -> f x;;