cat theory tweaks
[lambda.git] / advanced_topics / monads_in_category_theory.mdwn
index 7b52c3a..29b6feb 100644 (file)
@@ -63,11 +63,11 @@ A good intuitive picture of a category is as a generalized directed graph, where
 
 Some examples of categories are:
 
-*      Categories whose elements are sets and whose morphisms are functions between those sets. Here the source and target of a function are its domain and range, so distinct functions sharing a domain and range (e.g., sin and cos) are distinct morphisms between the same source and target elements. The identity morphism for any element/set is just the identity function for that set.
+*      Categories whose elements are sets and whose morphisms are functions between those sets. Here the source and target of a function are its domain and range, so distinct functions sharing a domain and range (e.g., `sin` and `cos`) are distinct morphisms between the same source and target elements. The identity morphism for any element/set is just the identity function for that set.
 
 *      any monoid <code>(S,&#8902;,z)</code> generates a category with a single element `x`; this `x` need not have any relation to `S`. The members of `S` play the role of *morphisms* of this category, rather than its elements. All of these morphisms are understood to map `x` to itself. The result of composing the morphism consisting of `s1` with the morphism `s2` is the morphism `s3`, where <code>s3=s1&#8902;s2</code>. The identity morphism for the (single) category element `x` is the monoid's identity `z`.
 
-*      a **preorder** is a structure `(S, &le;)` consisting of a reflexive, transitive, binary relation on a set `S`. It need not be connected (that is, there may be members `x`,`y` of `S` such that neither `x&le;y` nor `y&le;x`). It need not be anti-symmetric (that is, there may be members `s1`,`s2` of `S` such that `s1&le;s2` and `s2&le;s1` but `s1` and `s2` are not identical). Some examples:
+*      a **preorder** is a structure <code>(S, &le;)</code> consisting of a reflexive, transitive, binary relation on a set `S`. It need not be connected (that is, there may be members `x`,`y` of `S` such that neither <code>x&le;y</code> nor <code>y&le;x</code>). It need not be anti-symmetric (that is, there may be members `s1`,`s2` of `S` such that <code>s1&le;s2</code> and <code>s2&le;s1</code> but `s1` and `s2` are not identical). Some examples:
 
        *       sentences ordered by logical implication ("p and p" implies and is implied by "p", but these sentences are not identical; so this illustrates a pre-order without anti-symmetry)
        *       sets ordered by size (this illustrates it too)
@@ -80,10 +80,16 @@ Functors
 A **functor** is a "homomorphism", that is, a structure-preserving mapping, between categories. In particular, a functor `F` from category <b>C</b> to category <b>D</b> must:
 
 <pre>
-       (i) associate with every element C1 of <b>C</b> an element F(C1) of <b>D</b>
-       (ii) associate with every morphism f:C1&rarr;C2 of <b>C</b> a morphism F(f):F(C1)&rarr;F(C2) of <b>D</b>
-       (iii) "preserve identity", that is, for every element C1 of <b>C</b>: F of C1's identity morphism in <b>C</b> must be the identity morphism of F(C1) in <b>D</b>: F(1<sub>C1</sub>) = 1<sub>F(C1)</sub>.
-       (iv) "distribute over composition", that is for any morphisms f and g in <b>C</b>: F(g &#8728; f) = F(g) &#8728; F(f)
+         (i) associate with every element C1 of <b>C</b> an element F(C1) of <b>D</b>
+
+        (ii) associate with every morphism f:C1&rarr;C2 of <b>C</b> a morphism F(f):F(C1)&rarr;F(C2) of <b>D</b>
+
+       (iii) "preserve identity", that is, for every element C1 of <b>C</b>:
+             F of C1's identity morphism in <b>C</b> must be the identity morphism of F(C1) in <b>D</b>:
+             F(1<sub>C1</sub>) = 1<sub>F(C1)</sub>.
+
+        (iv) "distribute over composition", that is for any morphisms f and g in <b>C</b>:
+             F(g &#8728; f) = F(g) &#8728; F(f)
 </pre>
 
 A functor that maps a category to itself is called an **endofunctor**. The (endo)functor that maps every element and morphism of <b>C</b> to itself is denoted `1C`.
@@ -98,60 +104,77 @@ Natural Transformation
 ----------------------
 So categories include elements and morphisms. Functors consist of mappings from the elements and morphisms of one category to those of another (or the same) category. **Natural transformations** are a third level of mappings, from one functor to another.
 
-Where `G` and `H` are functors from category <b>C</b> to category <b>D</b>, a natural transformation &eta; between `G` and `H` is a family of morphisms &eta;[C1]:G(C1)&rarr;H(C1)` in <b>D</b> for each element `C1` of <b>C</b>. That is, &eta;[C1]` has as source `C1`'s image under `G` in <b>D</b>, and as target `C1`'s image under `H` in <b>D</b>. The morphisms in this family must also satisfy the constraint:
+Where `G` and `H` are functors from category <b>C</b> to category <b>D</b>, a natural transformation &eta; between `G` and `H` is a family of morphisms <code>&eta;[C1]:G(C1)&rarr;H(C1)</code> in <b>D</b> for each element `C1` of <b>C</b>. That is, <code>&eta;[C1]</code> has as source `C1`'s image under `G` in <b>D</b>, and as target `C1`'s image under `H` in <b>D</b>. The morphisms in this family must also satisfy the constraint:
 
-       for every morphism f:C1&rarr;C2 in <b>C</b>: &eta;[C2] &#8728; G(f) = H(f) &#8728; &eta;[C1]
+<pre>
+       for every morphism f:C1&rarr;C2 in <b>C</b>:
+       &eta;[C2] &#8728; G(f) = H(f) &#8728; &eta;[C1]
+</pre>
 
-That is, the morphism via `G(f)` from `G(C1)` to `G(C2)`, and then via &eta;[C2]` to `H(C2)`, is identical to the morphism from `G(C1)` via &eta;[C1]` to `H(C1)`, and then via `H(f)` from `H(C1)` to `H(C2)`.
+That is, the morphism via `G(f)` from `G(C1)` to `G(C2)`, and then via <code>&eta;[C2]</code> to `H(C2)`, is identical to the morphism from `G(C1)` via <code>&eta;[C1]</code> to `H(C1)`, and then via `H(f)` from `H(C1)` to `H(C2)`.
 
 
 How natural transformations compose:
 
 Consider four categories <b>B</b>, <b>C</b>, <b>D</b>, and <b>E</b>. Let `F` be a functor from <b>B</b> to <b>C</b>; `G`, `H`, and `J` be functors from <b>C</b> to <b>D</b>; and `K` and `L` be functors from <b>D</b> to <b>E</b>. Let &eta; be a natural transformation from `G` to `H`; &phi; be a natural transformation from `H` to `J`; and &psi; be a natural transformation from `K` to `L`. Pictorally:
 
+<pre>
        - <b>B</b> -+ +--- <b>C</b> --+ +---- <b>D</b> -----+ +-- <b>E</b> --
                 | |        | |            | |
-        F: -----&rarr; G: -----&rarr;     K: -----&rarr;
-                | |        | |  | &eta;     | |  | &psi;
+        F: ------> G: ------>     K: ------>
+                | |        | |  | &eta;       | |  | &psi;
                 | |        | |  v         | |  v
-                | |    H: -----&rarr;     L: -----&rarr;
-                | |        | |  | &phi;     | |
+                | |    H: ------>     L: ------>
+                | |        | |  | &phi;       | |
                 | |        | |  v         | |
-                | |    J: -----&rarr;         | |
+                | |    J: ------>         | |
        -----+ +--------+ +------------+ +-------
+</pre>
 
-Then `(&eta; F)` is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor `GF` to the composite functor `HF`, such that where `b1` is an element of category <b>B</b>, `(&eta; F)[b1] = &eta;[F(b1)]`---that is, the morphism in <b>D</b> that &eta; assigns to the element `F(b1)` of <b>C</b>.
+Then <code>(&eta; F)</code> is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor `GF` to the composite functor `HF`, such that where `B1` is an element of category <b>B</b>, <code>(&eta; F)[B1] = &eta;[F(B1)]</code>---that is, the morphism in <b>D</b> that <code>&eta;</code> assigns to the element `F(B1)` of <b>C</b>.
 
-And `(K &eta;)` is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor `KG` to the (composite) functor `KH`, such that where `C1` is an element of category <b>C</b>, `(K &eta;)[C1] = K(&eta;[C1])`---that is, the morphism in <b>E</b> that `K` assigns to the morphism &eta;[C1]` of <b>D</b>.
+And <code>(K &eta;)</code> is a natural transformation from the (composite) functor `KG` to the (composite) functor `KH`, such that where `C1` is an element of category <b>C</b>, <code>(K &eta;)[C1] = K(&eta;[C1])</code>---that is, the morphism in <b>E</b> that `K` assigns to the morphism <code>&eta;[C1]</code> of <b>D</b>.
 
 
-`(&phi; -v- &eta;)` is a natural transformation from `G` to `J`; this is known as a "vertical composition". We will rely later on this, where `f:C1&rarr;C2`:
+<code>(&phi; -v- &eta;)</code> is a natural transformation from `G` to `J`; this is known as a "vertical composition". We will rely later on this, where <code>f:C1&rarr;C2</code>:
 
+<pre>
        &phi;[C2] &#8728; H(f) &#8728; &eta;[C1] = &phi;[C2] &#8728; H(f) &#8728; &eta;[C1]
+</pre>
 
-by naturalness of &phi;, is:
+by naturalness of <code>&phi;</code>, is:
 
+<pre>
        &phi;[C2] &#8728; H(f) &#8728; &eta;[C1] = J(f) &#8728; &phi;[C1] &#8728; &eta;[C1]
+</pre>
 
-by naturalness of &eta;, is:
+by naturalness of <code>&eta;</code>, is:
 
+<pre>
        &phi;[C2] &#8728; &eta;[C2] &#8728; G(f) = J(f) &#8728; &phi;[C1] &#8728; &eta;[C1]
+</pre>
 
-Hence, we can define `(&phi; -v- &eta;)[x]` as: &phi;[x] &#8728; &eta;[x]` and rely on it to satisfy the constraints for a natural transformation from `G` to `J`:
+Hence, we can define <code>(&phi; -v- &eta;)[\_]</code> as: <code>&phi;[\_] &#8728; &eta;[\_]</code> and rely on it to satisfy the constraints for a natural transformation from `G` to `J`:
 
+<pre>
        (&phi; -v- &eta;)[C2] &#8728; G(f) = J(f) &#8728; (&phi; -v- &eta;)[C1]
+</pre>
 
 An observation we'll rely on later: given the definitions of vertical composition and of how natural transformations compose with functors, it follows that:
 
+<pre>
        ((&phi; -v- &eta;) F) = ((&phi; F) -v- (&eta; F))
+</pre>
 
 I'll assert without proving that vertical composition is associative and has an identity, which we'll call "the identity transformation."
 
 
-`(&psi; -h- &eta;)` is natural transformation from the (composite) functor `KG` to the (composite) functor `LH`; this is known as a "horizontal composition." It's trickier to define, but we won't be using it here. For reference:
+<code>(&psi; -h- &eta;)</code> is natural transformation from the (composite) functor `KG` to the (composite) functor `LH`; this is known as a "horizontal composition." It's trickier to define, but we won't be using it here. For reference:
 
+<pre>
        (&phi; -h- &eta;)[C1]  =  L(&eta;[C1]) &#8728; &psi;[G(C1)]
-                                          =  &psi;[H(C1)] &#8728; K(&eta;[C1])
+                                 =  &psi;[H(C1)] &#8728; K(&eta;[C1])
+</pre>
 
 Horizontal composition is also associative, and has the same identity as vertical composition.