Merge branch 'pryor'
[lambda.git] / week3.mdwn
1 ##Computing the length of a list##
2
3 How could we compute the length of a list? Without worrying yet about what lambda-calculus implementation we're using for the list, the basic idea would be to define this recursively:
4
5 >       the empty list has length 0
6
7 >       any non-empty list has length 1 + (the length of its tail)
8
9 In OCaml, you'd define that like this:
10
11         let rec get_length = fun lst ->
12                 if lst == [] then 0 else 1 + get_length (tail lst)
13         in ... (* here you go on to use the function "get_length" *)
14
15 In Scheme you'd define it like this:
16
17         (letrec [(get_length
18                                 (lambda (lst) (if (null? lst) 0 [+ 1 (get_length (cdr lst))] )) )]
19                 ... ; here you go on to use the function "get_length"
20         )
21
22 Some comments on this:
23
24 1. `null?` is Scheme's way of saying `isempty`. That is, `(null? lst)` returns true (which Scheme writes as `#t`) iff `lst` is the empty list (which Scheme writes as `'()` or `(list)`).
25
26 2. `cdr` is function that gets the tail of a Scheme list. (By definition, it's the function for getting the second member of an ordered pair. It just turns out to return the tail of a list because of the particular way Scheme implements lists.)
27
28 3.      I use `get_length` instead of the convention we've been following so far of hyphenated names, as in `make-list`, because we're discussing OCaml code here, too, and OCaml doesn't permit the hyphenated variable names. OCaml requires variables to always start with a lower-case letter (or `_`), and then continue with only letters, numbers, `_` or `'`. Most other programming languages are similar. Scheme is very relaxed, and permits you to use `-`, `?`, `/`, and all sorts of other crazy characters in your variable names.
29
30 4.      I alternate between `[ ]`s and `( )`s in the Scheme code just to make it more readable. These have no syntactic difference.
31
32
33 The main question for us to dwell on here is: What are the `let rec` in the OCaml code and the `letrec` in the Scheme code?
34
35 Answer: These work like the `let` expressions we've already seen, except that they let you use the variable `get_length` *inside* the body of the function being bound to it---with the understanding that it will there refer to the same function that you're then in the process of binding to `get_length`. So our recursively-defined function works the way we'd expect it to. In OCaml:
36
37         let rec get_length = fun lst ->
38                 if lst == [] then 0 else 1 + get_length (tail lst)
39         in get_length [20; 30]
40         (* this evaluates to 2 *)
41
42 In Scheme:
43
44         (letrec [(get_length 
45                                 (lambda (lst) (if (null? lst) 0 [+ 1 (get_length (cdr lst))] )) )]
46                         (get_length (list 20 30)))
47         ; this evaluates to 2
48         
49 If you instead use an ordinary `let` (or `let*`), here's what would happen, in OCaml:
50
51         let get_length = fun lst ->
52                 if lst == [] then 0 else 1 + get_length (tail lst)
53         in get_length [20; 30]
54         (* fails with error "Unbound value length" *)
55
56 Here's Scheme:
57
58         (let* [(get_length 
59                                 (lambda (lst) (if (null? lst) 0 [+ 1 (get_length (cdr lst))] )) )]
60                         (get_length (list 20 30)))
61         ; fails with error "reference to undefined identifier: get_length"
62
63 Why? Because we said that constructions of this form:
64
65         let get_length = A
66                 in B
67
68 really were just another way of saying:
69
70         (\get_length. B) A
71
72 and so the occurrences of `get_length` in A *aren't bound by the `\get_length` that wraps B*. Those occurrences are free.
73
74 We can verify this by wrapping the whole expression in a more outer binding of `get_length` to some other function, say the constant function from any list to the integer 99:
75
76         let get_length = fun lst -> 99
77         in let get_length = fun lst ->
78                         if lst == [] then 0 else 1 + get_length (tail lst)
79         in get_length [20; 30]
80         (* evaluates to 1 + 99 *)
81
82 Here the use of `get_length` in `1 + get_length (tail lst)` can clearly be seen to be bound by the outermost `let`.
83
84 And indeed, if you tried to define `get_length` in the lambda calculus, how would you do it?
85
86         \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (get_length (extract-tail lst)))
87
88 We've defined all of `isempty`, `zero`, `add`, `one`, and `extract-tail` in earlier discussion. But what about `get_length`? That's not yet defined! In fact, that's the very formula we're trying here to specify.
89
90 What we really want to do is something like this:
91
92         \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (... (extract-tail lst)))
93
94 where this very same formula occupies the `...` position:
95
96         \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (
97                 \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (... (extract-tail lst)))
98                         (extract-tail lst)))
99
100 but as you can see, we'd still have to plug the formula back into itself again, and again, and again... No dice.
101
102 So how could we do it? And how do OCaml and Scheme manage to do it, with their `let rec` and `letrec`?
103
104 1.      OCaml and Scheme do it using a trick. Well, not a trick. Actually an impressive, conceptually deep technique, which we haven't yet developed. Since we want to build up all the techniques we're using by hand, then, we shouldn't permit ourselves to rely on `let rec` or `letrec` until we thoroughly understand what's going on under the hood.
105
106 2.      If you tried this in Scheme:
107
108                 (define get_length 
109                                 (lambda (lst) (if (null? lst) 0 [+ 1 (get_length (cdr lst))] )) )
110                 
111                 (get_length (list 20 30))
112
113         You'd find that it works! This is because `define` in Scheme is really shorthand for `letrec`, not for plain `let` or `let*`. So we should regard this as cheating, too.
114
115 3.      In fact, it *is* possible to define the `get_length` function in the lambda calculus despite these obstacles. This depends on using the "version 3" implementation of lists, and exploiting its internal structure: that it takes a function and a base value and returns the result of folding that function over the list, with that base value. So we could use this as a definition of `get_length`:
116
117                 \lst. lst (\x sofar. successor sofar) zero
118
119         What's happening here? We start with the value zero, then we apply the function `\x sofar. successor sofar` to the two arguments <code>x<sub>n</sub></code> and `zero`, where <code>x<sub>n</sub></code> is the last element of the list. This gives us `successor zero`, or `one`. That's the value we've accumuluted "so far." Then we go apply the function `\x sofar. successor sofar` to the two arguments <code>x<sub>n-1</sub></code> and the value `one` that we've accumulated "so far." This gives us `two`. We continue until we get to the start of the list. The value we've then built up "so far" will be the length of the list.
120
121 We can use similar techniques to define many recursive operations on lists and numbers. The reason we can do this is that our "version 3," fold-based implementation of lists, and Church's implementations of numbers, have a internal structure that *mirrors* the common recursive operations we'd use lists and numbers for.
122
123 As we said before, it does take some ingenuity to define functions like `extract-tail` or `predecessor` for these implementations. However it can be done. (And it's not *that* difficult.) Given those functions, we can go on to define other functions like numeric equality, subtraction, and so on, just by exploiting the structure already present in our implementations of lists and numbers.
124
125 With sufficient ingenuity, a great many functions can be defined in the same way. For example, the factorial function is straightforward. The function which returns the nth term in the Fibonacci series is a bit more difficult, but also achievable.
126
127 ##However...##
128
129 Some computable functions are just not definable in this way. The simplest function that *simply cannot* be defined using the resources we've so far developed is the [[!wikipedia Ackermann function]]:
130
131         A(m,n) =
132                 | when m == 0 -> n + 1
133                 | else when n == 0 -> A(m-1,1)
134                 | else -> A(m-1, A(m,n-1))
135
136         A(0,y) = y+1
137         A(1,y) = 2+(y+3) - 3
138         A(2,y) = 2(y+3) - 3
139         A(3,y) = 2^(y+3) - 3
140         A(4,y) = 2^(2^(2^...2)) [where there are y+3 2s] - 3
141         ...
142
143 Simpler functions always *could* be defined using the resources we've so far developed, although those definitions won't always be very efficient or easily intelligible.
144
145 But functions like the Ackermann function require us to develop a more general technique for doing recursion---and having developed it, it will often be easier to use it even in the cases where, in principle, we didn't have to.
146
147 ##How to do recursion with lower-case omega##
148
149 Recall our initial, abortive attempt above to define the `get_length` function in the lambda calculus. We said "What we really want to do is something like this:
150
151         \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (... (extract-tail lst)))
152
153 where this very same formula occupies the `...` position."
154
155 We are not going to exactly that, at least not yet. But we are going to do something close to it.
156
157 Consider a formula of the following form (don't worry yet about exactly how we'll fill the `...`s):
158
159         \h \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (... (extract-tail lst)))
160
161 Call that formula `H`. Now what would happen if we applied `H` to itself? Then we'd get back:
162
163         \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (... (extract-tail lst)))
164
165 where any occurrences of `h` inside the `...` were substituted with `H`. Call this `F`. `F` looks pretty close to what we're after: a function that takes a list and returns zero if it's empty, and so on. And `F` is the result of applying `H` to itself. But now inside `F`, the occurrences of `h` are substituted with the very formula `H` we started with. So if we want to get `F` again, all we have to do is apply `h` to itself---since as we said, the self-application of `H` is how we created `F` in the first place.
166
167 So, the way `F` should be completed is:
168
169         \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one ((h h) (extract-tail lst)))
170
171 and our original `H` is:
172
173         \h \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one ((h h) (extract-tail lst)))
174
175 The self-application of `H` will give us `F` with `H` substituted in for its free variable `h`.
176
177 Instead of writing out a long formula twice, we could write:
178
179         (\x. x x) LONG-FORMULA
180
181 and the initial `(\x. x x)` is just what we earlier called the <code>&omega;</code> combinator (lower-case omega, not the non-terminating <code>&Omega;</code>). So the self-application of `H` can be written:
182
183 <pre><code>&omega; (\h \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one ((h h) (extract-tail lst))))</code></pre>
184
185 and this will indeed implement the recursive function we couldn't earlier figure out how to define.
186
187 In broad brush-strokes, `H` is half of the `get_length` function we're seeking, and `H` has the form:
188
189         \h other-arguments. ... (h h) ...
190
191 We get the whole `get_length` function by applying `H` to itself. Then `h` is replaced by the half `H`, and when we later apply `h` to itself, we re-create the whole `get_length` again.
192
193 ##Neat! Can I make it easier to use?##
194
195 Suppose you wanted to wrap this up in a pretty interface, so that the programmer didn't need to write `(h h)` but could just write `g` for some function `g`. How could you do it?
196
197 Now the `F`-like expression we'd be aiming for---call it `F*`---would look like this:
198
199         \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (g (extract-tail lst)))
200
201 or, abbreviating:
202
203         \lst. ...g...
204
205 Here we have just a single `g` instead of `(h h)`. We'd want `F*` to be the result of self-applying some `H*`, and then binding to `g` that very self-application of `H*`. We'd get that if `H*` had the form:
206
207         \h. (\g lst. ...g...) (h h)
208
209 The self-application of `H*` would be:
210
211         (\h. (\g lst. ...g...) (h h)) (\h. (\g lst. ...g...) (h h))
212
213 or:
214
215         (\f. (\h. f (h h)) (\h. f (h h))) (\g lst. ...g...)
216
217 The left-hand side of this is known as **the Y-combinator** and so this could be written more compactly as:
218
219         Y (\g lst. ...g...)
220
221 or, replacing the abbreviated bits:
222
223         Y (\g lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (g (extract-tail lst))))
224
225 So this is another way to implement the recursive function we couldn't earlier figure out how to define.
226
227
228 ##Generalizing##
229
230 Let's step back and fill in some theory to help us understand why these tricks work.
231
232 In general, we call a **fixed point** of a function f any value *x* such that f <em>x</em> is equivalent to *x*. For example, what is a fixed point of the function from natural numbers to their squares? What is a fixed point of the successor function?
233
234 In the lambda calculus, we say a fixed point of an expression `f` is any formula `X` such that:
235
236         X <~~> f X
237
238 What is a fixed point of the identity combinator I?
239
240 It's a theorem of the lambda calculus that every formula has a fixed point. In fact, it will have infinitely many, non-equivalent fixed points. And we don't just know that they exist: for any given formula, we can name many of them.
241
242 Yes, even the formula that you're using the define the successor function will have a fixed point. Isn't that weird? Think about how it might be true.
243
244 Well, you might think, only some of the formulas that we might give to the `successor` as arguments would really represent numbers. If we said something like:
245
246         successor make-pair
247
248 who knows what we'd get back? Perhaps there's some non-number-representing formula such that when we feed it to `successor` as an argument, we get the same formula back.
249
250 Yes! That's exactly right. And which formula this is will depend on the particular way you've implemented the successor function.
251
252 Moreover, the recipes that enable us to name fixed points for any given formula aren't *guaranteed* to give us *terminating* fixed points. They might give us formulas X such that neither `X` nor `f X` have normal forms. (Indeed, what they give us for the square function isn't any of the Church numerals, but is rather an expression with no normal form.) However, if we take care we can ensure that we *do* get terminating fixed points. And this gives us a principled, fully general strategy for doing recursion. It lets us define even functions like the Ackermann function, which were until now out of our reach. It would also let us define arithmetic and list functions on the "version 1" and "version 2" implementations, where it wasn't always clear how to force the computation to "keep going."
253
254 OK, so how do we make use of this?
255
256 Recall again our initial, abortive attempt above to define the `get_length` function in the lambda calculus. We said "What we really want to do is something like this:
257
258         \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (... (extract-tail lst)))
259
260 where this very same formula occupies the `...` position."
261
262 If we could somehow get ahold of this very formula, as an additional argument, then we could take the argument and plug it into the `...` position. Something like this:
263
264         \self (\lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (self (extract-tail lst))) )
265
266 This is an abstract of the form:
267
268         \self. BODY
269
270 where `BODY` is the expression:
271
272         \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (self (extract-tail lst)))
273
274 containing an occurrence of `self`.
275
276 Now consider what would be a fixed point of our expression `\self. BODY`? That would be some expression `X` such that:
277
278         X <~~> (\self.BODY) X
279
280 Beta-reducing the right-hand side, we get:
281
282         X <~~> BODY [self := X]
283
284 Think about what this says. It says if you substitute `X` for `self` in our formula BODY:
285
286         \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (X (extract-tail lst)))
287
288 what you get is "equivalent" to (that is, convertible with) X itself. That is, the `X` inside the above expression is equivalent to the whole expression. So the expression *does*, in a sense, contain itself!
289
290 Let's go over that again. If we had a fixed point `X` for our expression `\self. ...self...`, then by the definition of a fixed-point, this has to be true:
291
292         X <~~> (\self. ...self...) X
293
294 but beta-reducing the right-hand side, we get something of the form:
295
296         X <~~> ...X...
297
298 So on the right-hand side we have a complex expression, that contains some occurrences of whatever our fixed-point `X` is, and `X` is convertible with *that very complex, right-hand side expression.*
299
300 So we really *can* define `get_length` in the way we were initially attempting, in the bare lambda calculus, where Scheme and OCaml's souped-up `let rec` constructions aren't primitively available. (In fact, what we're doing here is the natural way to implement `let rec`.)
301
302 This all turns on having a way to generate a fixed-point for our "starting formula":
303
304         \self (\lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (self (extract-tail lst))) )
305
306 Where do we get it?
307
308 Suppose we have some **fixed-point combinator** 
309 <code>&Psi;</code>. That is, some function that returns, for any expression `f` we give it as argument, a fixed point for `f`. In other words:
310
311 <pre><code>&Psi; f <~~> f (&Psi; f)</code></pre>
312
313 Then applying <code>&Psi;</code> to the "starting formula" displayed above would give us our fixed point `X` for the starting formula:
314
315 <pre><code>&Psi; (\self (\lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (self (extract-tail lst))) ))</code></pre>
316
317 And this is the fully general strategy for 
318 defining recursive functions in the lambda calculus. You begin with a "body formula":
319
320         ...self...
321
322 containing free occurrences of `self` that you treat as being equivalent to the body formula itself. In the case we're considering, that was:
323
324         \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (self (extract-tail lst)))
325
326 You bind the free occurrence of `self` as: `\self. BODY`. And then you generate a fixed point for this larger expression:
327
328 <pre><code>&Psi; (\self. BODY)</code></pre>
329
330 using some fixed-point combinator <code>&Psi;</code>.
331
332 Isn't that cool?
333
334 ##Okay, then give me a fixed-point combinator, already!##
335
336 Many fixed-point combinators have been discovered. (And given a fixed-point combinator, there are ways to use it as a model to build infinitely many more, non-equivalent fixed-point combinators.)
337
338 Two of the simplest:
339
340 <pre><code>&Theta;&prime; &equiv; (\u f. f (\n. u u f n)) (\u f. f (\n. u u f n))
341 Y&prime; &equiv; \f. (\u. f (\n. u u n)) (\u. f (\n. u u n))</code></pre>
342
343 <code>&Theta;&prime;</code> has the advantage that <code>f (&Theta;&prime; f)</code> really *reduces to* <code>&Theta;&prime; f</code>.
344
345 <code>f (Y&prime; f)</code> is only convertible with <code>Y&prime; f</code>; that is, there's a common formula they both reduce to. For most purposes, though, either will do.
346
347 You may notice that both of these formulas have eta-redexes inside them: why can't we simplify the two `\n. u u f n` inside <code>&Theta;&prime;</code> to just `u u f`? And similarly for <code>Y&prime;</code>?
348
349 Indeed you can, getting the simpler:
350
351 <pre><code>&Theta; &equiv; (\u f. f (u u f)) (\u f. f (u u f))
352 Y &equiv; \f. (\u. f (u u)) (\u. f (u u))</code></pre>
353
354 I stated the more complex formulas for the following reason: in a language whose evaluation order is *call-by-value*, the evaluation of <code>&Theta; (\self. BODY)</code> and `Y (\self. BODY)` will in general not terminate. But evaluation of the eta-unreduced primed versions will.
355
356 Of course, if you define your `\self. BODY` stupidly, your formula will never terminate. For example, it doesn't matter what fixed point combinator you use for <code>&Psi;</code> in:
357
358 <pre><code>&Psi; (\self. \n. self n)</code></pre>
359
360 When you try to evaluate the application of that to some argument `M`, it's going to try to give you back:
361
362         (\n. self n) M
363
364 where `self` is equivalent to the very formula `\n. self n` that contains it. So the evaluation will proceed:
365
366         (\n. self n) M ~~>
367         self M ~~>
368         (\n. self n) M ~~>
369         self M ~~>
370         ...
371
372 You've written an infinite loop!
373
374 However, when we evaluate the application of our:
375
376 <pre><code>&Psi; (\self (\lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (self (extract-tail lst))) ))</code></pre>
377
378 to some list `L`, we're not going to go into an infinite evaluation loop of that sort. At each cycle, we're going to be evaluating the application of:
379
380         \lst. (isempty lst) zero (add one (self (extract-tail lst)))
381
382 to *the tail* of the list we were evaluating its application to at the previous stage. Assuming our lists are finite (and the implementations we're using don't permit otherwise), at some point one will get a list whose tail is empty, and then the evaluation of that formula to that tail will return `zero`. So the recursion eventually bottoms out in a base value.
383
384 ##Fixed-point Combinators Are a Bit Intoxicating##
385
386 ![tatoo](/y-combinator.jpg)
387
388 There's a tendency for people to say "Y-combinator" to refer to fixed-point combinators generally. We'll probably fall into that usage ourselves. Speaking correctly, though, the Y-combinator is only one of many fixed-point combinators.
389
390 I used <code>&Psi;</code> above to stand in for an arbitrary fixed-point combinator. I don't know of any broad conventions for this. But this seems a useful one.
391
392 As we said, there are many other fixed-point combinators as well. For example, Jan Willem Klop pointed out that if we define `L` to be:
393
394         \a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q s t u v w x y z r. (r (t h i s i s a f i x e d p o i n t c o m b i n a t o r))
395
396 then this is a fixed-point combinator:
397
398         L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L
399
400