9bb13d463c86245d6eb956f81b6528b359eb6b47
[lambda.git] / week2.mdwn
1 Syntactic equality, reduction, convertibility
2 =============================================
3
4 Define T to be `(\x. x y) z`. Then T and `(\x. x y) z` are syntactically equal, and we're counting them as syntactically equal to `(\z. z y) z` as well. We write:
5
6 <pre>
7 T &equiv; `(\x. x y) z` &equiv; `(\z. z y) z`
8 </pre>
9
10 This:
11
12 <pre>
13 T ~~> `z y`
14 </pre>
15
16 means that T beta-reduces to `z y`. This:
17
18 <pre>
19 M <~~> T
20 </pre>
21
22 means that M and T are beta-convertible, that is, that there's something they both reduce to in zero or more steps.
23
24 Combinators and Combinatorial Logic
25 ===================================
26
27 Lambda expressions that have no free variables are known as **combinators**. Here are some common ones:
28
29 <pre>
30 **I** is defined to be `\x x`<p>
31 **K** is defined to be `\x y. x`, That is, it throws away its second argument. So `K x` is a constant function from any (further) argument to `x`. ("K" for "constant".) Compare K to our definition of **true**.<p>
32 **get-first** was our function for extracting the first element of an ordered pair: `\fst snd. fst`. Compare this to K and true as well.<p>
33 **get-second** was our function for extracting the second element of an ordered pair: `\fst snd. snd`. Compare this to our definition of false.<p>
34 **&omega;** is defined to be: `\x. x x`<p>
35 </pre>
36
37 It's possible to build a logical system equally powerful as the lambda calculus (and straightforwardly intertranslatable with it) using just combinators, considered as atomic operations. Such a language doesn't have any variables in it: not just no free variables, but no variables at all.
38
39 One can do that with a very spare set of basic combinators. These days the standard base is just three combinators: K and I from above, and also one more, S, which behaves the same as the lambda expression  `\f g x. f x (g x)`. behaves.But it's possible to be even more minimalistic, and get by with only a single combinator. (And there are different single-combinator bases you can choose.)
40
41 These systems are Turing complete. In other words: every computation we know how to describe can be represented in a logical system consisting of only a single primitive operation!
42
43 Here's more to read about combinatorial logic:
44
45 MORE
46
47 Evaluation strategies
48 =====================
49
50 In the assignment we asked you to reduce various expressions until it wasn't possible to reduce them any further. For two of those expressions, this was impossible to do. One of them was this:
51
52         (\x. x x) (\x. x x)
53
54 As we saw above, each of the halves of this formula are the combinator &omega;; so this can also be written:
55
56 <pre><code>&omega; &omega;</code></pre>
57
58 This compound expression---the self-application of &omega;---is named &Omega;. It has the form of an application of an abstract (&omega;) to an argument (which also happens to be &omega;), so it's a redex and can be reduced. But when we reduce it, we get <code>&omega; &omega;</code> again. So there's no stage at which this expression has been reduced to a point where it can't be reduced any further. In other words, evaluation of this expression "never terminates." (This is standard language, however it has the unfortunate connotation that evaluation is a process or operation that is performed in time. You shouldn't think of it like that. Evaluation of this expression "never terminates" in the way that the decimal expansion of &pi; never terminates. This are static, atemporal facts about their mathematical properties.)
59
60 There are infinitely many formulas in the lambda calculus that have this same property. &Omega; is the syntactically simplest of them. In our meta-theory, it's common to assign such formula a special value, <code>&perp;</code>, pronounced "bottom." When we get to discussing types, you'll see that this value is counted as belonging to every type. To say that a formula has the bottom value means that the computation that formula represents never terminates and so doesn't evaluate to any orthodox value.
61
62 From a "Fregean" or "weak Kleene" perspective, if any component of an expression fails to be evaluable (to an orthodox, computed value), then the whole expression should be unevaluable as well.
63
64 However, in some such cases it seems *we could* sensibly carry on evaluation. For instance, consider:
65
66 <pre><code>
67 (\x. y) (&omega; &omega;)
68 </code></pre>
69
70 Should we count this as unevaluable, because the reduction of <code>&omega; &omega;</code> never terminates? Or should we count it as evaluating to `y`?
71
72 This question highlights that there are different choices to make about how evaluation or computation proceeds. It's helpful to think of three questions in this neighborhood:
73
74 >       Q1. When arguments are complex, as <code>&omega; &omega;</code>, do we reduce them before or after substituting them into the abstracts to which they are arguments?
75
76 >       Q2. Are we allowed to reduce inside abstracts? That is, can we reduce:
77
78 >               (\x y. x z) (\x. x)
79
80 >       only this far:
81
82 >               \y. (\x. x) z
83
84 >       or can we continue reducing to:
85
86 >               \y. z
87
88 >       Q3. Are we allowed to "eta-reduce"? That is, can we reduce expressions of the form:
89
90 >               \x. M x
91
92 >       where x does not occur free in `M`, to `M`? It should be intuitively clear that `\x. M x` and `M` will behave the same with respect to any arguments they are given. It can also be proven that no other functions can behave differently with respect to them. However, the logical system you get when eta-reduction is added to the proof theory is importantly different from the one where only beta-reduction is permitted.
93
94
95 The evaluation strategy which answers Q1 by saying "reduce arguments first" is known as **call-by-value**. The evaluation strategy which answers Q1 by saying "substitute arguments in unreduced" is known as **call-by-name** or **call-by-need** (the difference between these has to do with efficiency, not semantics).
96
97 When one has a call-by-value strategy that also permits reduction to continue inside unapplied abstracts, that's known as "applicative order" reduction. When one has a call-by-name stratehy that oermits reduction inside abstracts, that's known as "normal order" reduction. Consider an expression of the form:
98
99         ((A B) (C D)) (E F)
100
101 Its syntax has the following tree:
102
103   ((A B) (C D)) (E F)
104        /     \
105       /       \
106 ((A B) (C D))  \
107     /\        (E F)
108    /  \        /\
109   /    \      E  F
110 (A B) (C D)
111  /\    /\
112 /  \  /  \
113 A   B C   D
114
115 Applicative order evaluation does what's called a "post-order traversal" of the tree: that is, we always go left and down whenever we can, and we process a node only after processing all its children. So `(C D)` gets processed before `((A B) (C D))` does, and `(E F)` gets processed before `((A B) (C D)) (E F)` does.
116
117 Normal order evaluation, on the other hand, will substitute the expresion `(C D)` into the abstract that `(A B)` evaluates to, without first trying to compute what `(C D)` evaluates to. That computation may be done later.
118
119 When we have an expression like:
120
121         (\x. y) (C D)
122
123 the computation of `(C D)` won't ever have to be performed, on a normal order or call by name evaluation strategy. Instead, that reduces directly to `y`. This is so even if `(C D)` is the non-evaluable <code>(&omega; &omega;)</code>!
124
125 Most programming languages, including Scheme and OCaml, use the call-by-value evaluation strategy. (But they don't permit evaluation to continue inside an unappplied function.) There are techniques for making them model the other sort of behavior.
126
127 Some functional programming languages, such as Haskell, use the call-by-name evaluation strategy. Each has pros and cons.
128
129 The lambda calculus can be evaluated either way. You have to decide what the rules shall be.
130
131 One important advantage of the normal-order evaluation strategy is that it can compute an orthodox value for:
132
133 <pre><code>
134 (\x. y) (&omega; &omega;)
135 </code></pre>
136
137 Indeed, it's provable that if there's any reduction path that delivers a value for an expression, the normal-order evalutation strategy will terminate with that value.
138
139 An expression is said to be in **normal form** when it's not possible to perform any more reductions. (EVEN INSIDE ABSTRACTS?) There's a sense in which you can't get anything more out of <code>&omega; &omega;</code>, but it's not in normal form because it still has the form of a redex.
140
141 A computational system is said to be **confluent**, or to have the **Church-Rosser** or **diamond** property, if, whenever there are multiple possible evaluation paths, those that terminate always terminate in the same value. In such a system, the choice of which sub-expressions to evaluate first will only matter if some of them but not others might lead down a non-terminating path.
142
143 The untyped lambda calculus is confluent. So long as a computation terminates, it always terminates in the same way. It doesn't matter which order the sub-expressions are evaluated in.
144
145 A computational system is said to be **strongly normalizing** if every permitted evaluation path is guaranteed to terminate. The untyped lambda calculus is not strongly normalizing: <code>&omega; &omega;</code> doesn't terminate by any evaluation path; and <code>(\x. y) (&omega; &omega;)</code> terminates only by some evaluation paths but not by others.
146
147 But the untyped lambda calculus enjoys some compensation for this weakness. It's Turing complete! It can represent any computation we know how to describe. (That's the cash value of being Turing complete, not the rigorous definition. We don't know how to rigorously define "any computation we know how to describe." There is however a rigorous definition for being Turing complete.) And in fact, it's been proven that you can't havee both. If a language is Turing complete, it cannot be strongly normalizing.
148
149 A computational system is said to be **weakly normalizing** if there's always guaranteed to be *at least one* evaluation path that terminates. The untyped lambda calculus is not weakly normalizing either, as we've seen.
150
151 The *typed* lambda calculus that linguists traditionally work with, on the other hand, is strongly normalizing. (And as a result, is not Turning complete.) It has expressive power that the untyped lambda calculus lacks, but it is also unable to represent some (terminating!) computations that the untyped lambda calculus can represent.
152
153 Other more-powerful type systems we'll look at in the course will also fail to be Turing complete, though they will turn out to be pretty powerful.
154
155
156
157
158
159
160 K
161 omega
162 true/get-first/K
163 false/get-second
164 make-pair
165 S,B,C,W/dup,Omega
166
167 (( combinatorial logic ))
168
169
170
171
172 We'll write that like this:
173
174         ((\x (y x)) z) ~~> (y z)
175
176 Different authors use different notations. Some authors use the term "contraction" for a single reduction step, and reserve the term "reduction" for the reflexive transitive closure of that, that is, for zero or more reduction steps. Informally, it seems easiest to us to say "reduction" for one or more reduction steps. So when we write:
177
178         M ~~> N
179
180 We'll mean that you can get from M to N by one or more reduction steps. Hankin uses the symbol <code><big><big>&rarr;</big></big></code> for one-step contraction, and the symbol <code><big><big>&#8608;</big></big></code> for zero-or-more step reduction. Hindley and Seldin use <code><big><big><big>&#8883;</big></big></big><sub>1</sub></code> and <code><big><big><big>&#8883;</big></big></big></code>.
181
182 When M and N are such that there's some P that M reduces to by zero or more steps, and that N also reduces to by zero or more steps, then we say that M and N are **beta-convertible**. We'll write that like this:
183
184         M <~~> N
185
186 This is what plays the role of equality in the lambda calculus. Hankin uses the symbol `=` for this. So too do Hindley and Seldin. Personally, I keep confusing that with the relation to be described next, so let's use this notation instead. Note that `M <~~> N` doesn't mean that each of `M` and `N` are reducible to each other; that only holds when `M` and `N` are the same expression. (Or, with our convention of only saying "reducible" for one or more reduction steps, it never holds.)
187
188 In the metatheory, it's also sometimes useful to talk about formulas that are syntactically equivalent *before any reductions take place*. Hankin uses the symbol <code>&equiv;</code> for this. So too do Hindley and Seldin. We'll use that too, and will avoid using `=` when discussing the metatheory. Instead we'll use `<~~>` as we said above. When we want to introduce a stipulative definition, we'll write it out longhand, as in:
189
190
191 combinators as lambda expressions
192 combinatorial logic
193
194 tuples = possibly type-heterogenous ordered collections, different length -> different type
195 lists = type-homogenous ordered collections, lists of different lengths >=0 can be of same type
196
197
198
199
200 1.      Substitution; using alpha-conversion and other strategies
201 1.      Conversion versus reduction
202
203 1.      Different evaluation strategies (call by name, call by value, etc.)
204 1.      Strongly normalizing vs weakly normalizing vs non-normalizing; Church-Rosser Theorem(s)
205 1.      Lambda calculus compared to combinatorial logic<p>
206 1.      Church-like encodings of numbers, defining addition and multiplication
207 1.      Defining the predecessor function; alternate encodings for the numbers
208 1.      Homogeneous sequences or "lists"; how they differ from pairs, triples, etc.
209 1.      Representing lists as pairs
210 1.      Representing lists as folds
211 1.      Typical higher-order functions: map, filter, fold<p>
212 1.      Recursion exploiting the fold-like representation of numbers and lists ([[!wikipedia Deforestation (computer science)]], [[!wikipedia Zipper (data structure)]])
213 1.      General recursion using omega
214
215 1.      Eta reduction and "extensionality" ??
216 Undecidability of equivalence
217
218 There is no algorithm which takes as input two lambda expressions and outputs TRUE or FALSE depending on whether or not the two expressions are equivalent. This was historically the first problem for which undecidability could be proven. As is common for a proof of undecidability, the proof shows that no computable function can decide the equivalence. Church's thesis is then invoked to show that no algorithm can do so.
219
220 Church's proof first reduces the problem to determining whether a given lambda expression has a normal form. A normal form is an equivalent expression which cannot be reduced any further under the rules imposed by the form. Then he assumes that this predicate is computable, and can hence be expressed in lambda calculus. Building on earlier work by Kleene and constructing a Gödel numbering for lambda expressions, he constructs a lambda expression e which closely follows the proof of Gödel's first incompleteness theorem. If e is applied to its own Gödel number, a contradiction results.
221
222
223
224 1.      The Y combinator(s); more on evaluation strategies<p>
225 1.      Introducing the notion of a "continuation", which technique we'll now already have used a few times
226
227
228
229 alpha-convertible
230
231 syntactic equality `===`
232 contract/reduce/`~~>`
233 convertible `<~~>`
234
235 normalizing
236         weakly normalizable
237         strongly normalizable
238         "normal order" reduction vs "applicative order"
239         eval strategy choices
240
241                                 Reduction strategies For more details on this topic, see Evaluation
242                 strategy.
243
244                                 Whether a term is normalising or not, and how much work needs to be
245                 done in normalising it if it is, depends to a large extent on the reduction
246                 strategy used. The distinction between reduction strategies relates to the
247                 distinction in functional programming languages between eager evaluation and
248                 lazy evaluation.
249
250                                 Full beta reductions Any redex can be reduced at any time. This means
251                 essentially the lack of any particular reduction strategy—with regard to
252                 reducibility, "all bets are off". Applicative order The leftmost, innermost
253                 redex is always reduced first. Intuitively this means a function's arguments
254                 are always reduced before the function itself. Applicative order always
255                 attempts to apply functions to normal forms, even when this is not possible.
256                 Most programming languages (including Lisp, ML and imperative languages like C
257                 and Java) are described as "strict", meaning that functions applied to
258                 non-normalising arguments are non-normalising. This is done essentially using
259                 applicative order, call by value reduction (see below), but usually called
260                 "eager evaluation". Normal order The leftmost, outermost redex is always
261                 reduced first. That is, whenever possible the arguments are substituted into
262                 the body of an abstraction before the arguments are reduced. Call by name As
263                 normal order, but no reductions are performed inside abstractions. For example
264                 λx.(λx.x)x is in normal form according to this strategy, although it contains
265                 the redex (λx.x)x. Call by value Only the outermost redexes are reduced: a
266                 redex is reduced only when its right hand side has reduced to a value (variable
267                 or lambda abstraction). Call by need As normal order, but function applications
268                 that would duplicate terms instead name the argument, which is then reduced
269                 only "when it is needed". Called in practical contexts "lazy evaluation". In
270                 implementations this "name" takes the form of a pointer, with the redex
271                 represented by a thunk.
272
273                                 Applicative order is not a normalising strategy. The usual
274                 counterexample is as follows: define Ω = ωω where ω = λx.xx. This entire
275                 expression contains only one redex, namely the whole expression; its reduct is
276                 again Ω. Since this is the only available reduction, Ω has no normal form
277                 (under any evaluation strategy). Using applicative order, the expression KIΩ =
278                 (λxy.x) (λx.x)Ω is reduced by first reducing Ω to normal form (since it is the
279                 leftmost redex), but since Ω has no normal form, applicative order fails to
280                 find a normal form for KIΩ.
281
282                                 In contrast, normal order is so called because it always finds a
283                 normalising reduction if one exists. In the above example, KIΩ reduces under
284                 normal order to I, a normal form. A drawback is that redexes in the arguments
285                 may be copied, resulting in duplicated computation (for example, (λx.xx)
286                 ((λx.x)y) reduces to ((λx.x)y) ((λx.x)y) using this strategy; now there are two
287                 redexes, so full evaluation needs two more steps, but if the argument had been
288                 reduced first, there would now be none).
289
290                                 The positive tradeoff of using applicative order is that it does not
291                 cause unnecessary computation if all arguments are used, because it never
292                 substitutes arguments containing redexes and hence never needs to copy them
293                 (which would duplicate work). In the above example, in applicative order
294                 (λx.xx) ((λx.x)y) reduces first to (λx.xx)y and then to the normal order yy,
295                 taking two steps instead of three.
296
297                                 Most purely functional programming languages (notably Miranda and its
298                 descendents, including Haskell), and the proof languages of theorem provers,
299                 use lazy evaluation, which is essentially the same as call by need. This is
300                 like normal order reduction, but call by need manages to avoid the duplication
301                 of work inherent in normal order reduction using sharing. In the example given
302                 above, (λx.xx) ((λx.x)y) reduces to ((λx.x)y) ((λx.x)y), which has two redexes,
303                 but in call by need they are represented using the same object rather than
304                 copied, so when one is reduced the other is too.
305
306
307
308
309                 Strict evaluation Main article: strict evaluation
310
311                 In strict evaluation, the arguments to a function are always evaluated
312                 completely before the function is applied.
313
314                 Under Church encoding, eager evaluation of operators maps to strict evaluation
315                 of functions; for this reason, strict evaluation is sometimes called "eager".
316                 Most existing programming languages use strict evaluation for functions. [edit]
317                 Applicative order
318
319                 Applicative order (or leftmost innermost) evaluation refers to an evaluation
320                 strategy in which the arguments of a function are evaluated from left to right
321                 in a post-order traversal of reducible expressions (redexes). Unlike
322                 call-by-value, applicative order evaluation reduces terms within a function
323                 body as much as possible before the function is applied. [edit] Call by value
324
325                 Call-by-value evaluation (also referred to as pass-by-value) is the most common
326                 evaluation strategy, used in languages as different as C and Scheme. In
327                 call-by-value, the argument expression is evaluated, and the resulting value is
328                 bound to the corresponding variable in the function (frequently by copying the
329                 value into a new memory region). If the function or procedure is able to assign
330                 values to its parameters, only its local copy is assigned — that is, anything
331                 passed into a function call is unchanged in the caller's scope when the
332                 function returns.
333
334                 Call-by-value is not a single evaluation strategy, but rather the family of
335                 evaluation strategies in which a function's argument is evaluated before being
336                 passed to the function. While many programming languages (such as Eiffel and
337                 Java) that use call-by-value evaluate function arguments left-to-right, some
338                 evaluate functions and their arguments right-to-left, and others (such as
339                 Scheme, OCaml and C) leave the order unspecified (though they generally require
340                 implementations to be consistent).
341
342                 In some cases, the term "call-by-value" is problematic, as the value which is
343                 passed is not the value of the variable as understood by the ordinary meaning
344                 of value, but an implementation-specific reference to the value. The
345                 description "call-by-value where the value is a reference" is common (but
346                 should not be understood as being call-by-reference); another term is
347                 call-by-sharing. Thus the behaviour of call-by-value Java or Visual Basic and
348                 call-by-value C or Pascal are significantly different: in C or Pascal, calling
349                 a function with a large structure as an argument will cause the entire
350                 structure to be copied, potentially causing serious performance degradation,
351                 and mutations to the structure are invisible to the caller. However, in Java or
352                 Visual Basic only the reference to the structure is copied, which is fast, and
353                 mutations to the structure are visible to the caller. [edit] Call by reference
354
355                 In call-by-reference evaluation (also referred to as pass-by-reference), a
356                 function receives an implicit reference to the argument, rather than a copy of
357                 its value. This typically means that the function can modify the argument-
358                 something that will be seen by its caller. Call-by-reference therefore has the
359                 advantage of greater time- and space-efficiency (since arguments do not need to
360                 be copied), as well as the potential for greater communication between a
361                 function and its caller (since the function can return information using its
362                 reference arguments), but the disadvantage that a function must often take
363                 special steps to "protect" values it wishes to pass to other functions.
364
365                 Many languages support call-by-reference in some form or another, but
366                 comparatively few use it as a default; Perl and Visual Basic are two that do,
367                 though Visual Basic also offers a special syntax for call-by-value parameters.
368                 A few languages, such as C++ and REALbasic, default to call-by-value, but offer
369                 special syntax for call-by-reference parameters. C++ additionally offers
370                 call-by-reference-to-const. In purely functional languages there is typically
371                 no semantic difference between the two strategies (since their data structures
372                 are immutable, so there is no possibility for a function to modify any of its
373                 arguments), so they are typically described as call-by-value even though
374                 implementations frequently use call-by-reference internally for the efficiency
375                 benefits.
376
377                 Even among languages that don't exactly support call-by-reference, many,
378                 including C and ML, support explicit references (objects that refer to other
379                 objects), such as pointers (objects representing the memory addresses of other
380                 objects), and these can be used to effect or simulate call-by-reference (but
381                 with the complication that a function's caller must explicitly generate the
382                 reference to supply as an argument). [edit] Call by sharing
383
384                 Also known as "call by object" or "call by object-sharing" is an evaluation
385                 strategy first named by Barbara Liskov et al. for the language CLU in 1974[1].
386                 It is used by languages such as Python[2], Iota, Java (for object
387                 references)[3], Ruby, Scheme, OCaml, AppleScript, and many other languages.
388                 However, the term "call by sharing" is not in common use; the terminology is
389                 inconsistent across different sources. For example, in the Java community, they
390                 say that Java is pass-by-value, whereas in the Ruby community, they say that
391                 Ruby is pass-by-reference, even though the two languages exhibit the same
392                 semantics. Call-by-sharing implies that values in the language are based on
393                 objects rather than primitive types.
394
395                 The semantics of call-by-sharing differ from call-by-reference in that
396                 assignments to function arguments within the function aren't visible to the
397                 caller (unlike by-reference semantics)[citation needed]. However since the
398                 function has access to the same object as the caller (no copy is made),
399                 mutations to those objects within the function are visible to the caller, which
400                 differs from call-by-value semantics.
401
402                 Although this term has widespread usage in the Python community, identical
403                 semantics in other languages such as Java and Visual Basic are often described
404                 as call-by-value, where the value is implied to be a reference to the object.
405                 [edit] Call by copy-restore
406
407                 Call-by-copy-restore, call-by-value-result or call-by-value-return (as termed
408                 in the Fortran community) is a special case of call-by-reference where the
409                 provided reference is unique to the caller. If a parameter to a function call
410                 is a reference that might be accessible by another thread of execution, its
411                 contents are copied to a new reference that is not; when the function call
412                 returns, the updated contents of this new reference are copied back to the
413                 original reference ("restored").
414
415                 The semantics of call-by-copy-restore also differ from those of
416                 call-by-reference where two or more function arguments alias one another; that
417                 is, point to the same variable in the caller's environment. Under
418                 call-by-reference, writing to one will affect the other; call-by-copy-restore
419                 avoids this by giving the function distinct copies, but leaves the result in
420                 the caller's environment undefined (depending on which of the aliased arguments
421                 is copied back first).
422
423                 When the reference is passed to the callee uninitialized, this evaluation
424                 strategy may be called call-by-result. [edit] Partial evaluation Main article:
425                 Partial evaluation
426
427                 In partial evaluation, evaluation may continue into the body of a function that
428                 has not been applied. Any sub-expressions that do not contain unbound variables
429                 are evaluated, and function applications whose argument values are known may be
430                 reduced. In the presence of side-effects, complete partial evaluation may
431                 produce unintended results; for this reason, systems that support partial
432                 evaluation tend to do so only for "pure" expressions (expressions without
433                 side-effects) within functions. [edit] Non-strict evaluation
434
435                 In non-strict evaluation, arguments to a function are not evaluated unless they
436                 are actually used in the evaluation of the function body.
437
438                 Under Church encoding, lazy evaluation of operators maps to non-strict
439                 evaluation of functions; for this reason, non-strict evaluation is often
440                 referred to as "lazy". Boolean expressions in many languages use lazy
441                 evaluation; in this context it is often called short circuiting. Conditional
442                 expressions also usually use lazy evaluation, albeit for different reasons.
443                 [edit] Normal order
444
445                 Normal-order (or leftmost outermost) evaluation is the evaluation strategy
446                 where the outermost redex is always reduced, applying functions before
447                 evaluating function arguments. It differs from call-by-name in that
448                 call-by-name does not evaluate inside the body of an unapplied
449                 function[clarification needed]. [edit] Call by name
450
451                 In call-by-name evaluation, the arguments to functions are not evaluated at all
452                 — rather, function arguments are substituted directly into the function body
453                 using capture-avoiding substitution. If the argument is not used in the
454                 evaluation of the function, it is never evaluated; if the argument is used
455                 several times, it is re-evaluated each time. (See Jensen's Device.)
456
457                 Call-by-name evaluation can be preferable over call-by-value evaluation because
458                 call-by-name evaluation always yields a value when a value exists, whereas
459                 call-by-value may not terminate if the function's argument is a non-terminating
460                 computation that is not needed to evaluate the function. Opponents of
461                 call-by-name claim that it is significantly slower when the function argument
462                 is used, and that in practice this is almost always the case as a mechanism
463                 such as a thunk is needed. [edit] Call by need
464
465                 Call-by-need is a memoized version of call-by-name where, if the function
466                 argument is evaluated, that value is stored for subsequent uses. In a "pure"
467                 (effect-free) setting, this produces the same results as call-by-name; when the
468                 function argument is used two or more times, call-by-need is almost always
469                 faster.
470
471                 Because evaluation of expressions may happen arbitrarily far into a
472                 computation, languages using call-by-need generally do not support
473                 computational effects (such as mutation) except through the use of monads and
474                 uniqueness types. This eliminates any unexpected behavior from variables whose
475                 values change prior to their delayed evaluation.
476
477                 This is a kind of Lazy evaluation.
478
479                 Haskell is the most well-known language that uses call-by-need evaluation.
480
481                 R also uses a form of call-by-need. [edit] Call by macro expansion
482
483                 Call-by-macro-expansion is similar to call-by-name, but uses textual
484                 substitution rather than capture-avoiding substitution. With uncautious use,
485                 macro substitution may result in variable capture and lead to undesired
486                 behavior. Hygienic macros avoid this problem by checking for and replacing
487                 shadowed variables that are not parameters.
488
489
490
491
492                 Eager evaluation or greedy evaluation is the evaluation strategy in most
493                 traditional programming languages.
494
495                 In eager evaluation an expression is evaluated as soon as it gets bound to a
496                 variable. The term is typically used to contrast lazy evaluation, where
497                 expressions are only evaluated when evaluating a dependent expression. Eager
498                 evaluation is almost exclusively used in imperative programming languages where
499                 the order of execution is implicitly defined by the source code organization.
500
501                 One advantage of eager evaluation is that it eliminates the need to track and
502                 schedule the evaluation of expressions. It also allows the programmer to
503                 dictate the order of execution, making it easier to determine when
504                 sub-expressions (including functions) within the expression will be evaluated,
505                 as these sub-expressions may have side-effects that will affect the evaluation
506                 of other expressions.
507
508                 A disadvantage of eager evaluation is that it forces the evaluation of
509                 expressions that may not be necessary at run time, or it may delay the
510                 evaluation of expressions that have a more immediate need. It also forces the
511                 programmer to organize the source code for optimal order of execution.
512
513                 Note that many modern compilers are capable of scheduling execution to better
514                 optimize processor resources and can often eliminate unnecessary expressions
515                 from being executed entirely. Therefore, the notions of purely eager or purely
516                 lazy evaluation may not be applicable in practice.
517
518
519
520                 In computer programming, lazy evaluation is the technique of delaying a
521                 computation until the result is required.
522
523                 The benefits of lazy evaluation include: performance increases due to avoiding
524                 unnecessary calculations, avoiding error conditions in the evaluation of
525                 compound expressions, the capability of constructing potentially infinite data
526                 structures, and the capability of defining control structures as abstractions
527                 instead of as primitives.
528
529                 Languages that use lazy actions can be further subdivided into those that use a
530                 call-by-name evaluation strategy and those that use call-by-need. Most
531                 realistic lazy languages, such as Haskell, use call-by-need for performance
532                 reasons, but theoretical presentations of lazy evaluation often use
533                 call-by-name for simplicity.
534
535                 The opposite of lazy actions is eager evaluation, sometimes known as strict
536                 evaluation. Eager evaluation is the evaluation behavior used in most
537                 programming languages.
538
539                 Lazy evaluation refers to how expressions are evaluated when they are passed as
540                 arguments to functions and entails the following three points:[1]
541
542                    1. The expression is only evaluated if the result is required by the calling
543                 function, called delayed evaluation.[2] 2. The expression is only evaluated to
544                 the extent that is required by the calling function, called short-circuit
545                 evaluation. 3. The expression is never evaluated more than once, called
546                 applicative-order evaluation.[3]
547
548                 Contents [hide]
549
550                         * 1 Delayed evaluation
551                                   o 1.1 Control structures
552                         * 2 Controlling eagerness in lazy languages 3 Other uses 4 See also 5
553                         * References 6 External links
554
555                 [edit] Delayed evaluation
556
557                 Delayed evaluation is used particularly in functional languages. When using
558                 delayed evaluation, an expression is not evaluated as soon as it gets bound to
559                 a variable, but when the evaluator is forced to produce the expression's value.
560                 That is, a statement such as x:=expression; (i.e. the assignment of the result
561                 of an expression to a variable) clearly calls for the expression to be
562                 evaluated and the result placed in x, but what actually is in x is irrelevant
563                 until there is a need for its value via a reference to x in some later
564                 expression whose evaluation could itself be deferred, though eventually the
565                 rapidly-growing tree of dependencies would be pruned in order to produce some
566                 symbol rather than another for the outside world to see.
567
568                 Some programming languages delay evaluation of expressions by default, and some
569                 others provide functions or special syntax to delay evaluation. In Miranda and
570                 Haskell, evaluation of function arguments is delayed by default. In many other
571                 languages, evaluation can be delayed by explicitly suspending the computation
572                 using special syntax (as with Scheme's "delay" and "force" and OCaml's "lazy"
573                 and "Lazy.force") or, more generally, by wrapping the expression in a thunk.
574                 The object representing such an explicitly delayed evaluation is called a
575                 future or promise. Perl 6 uses lazy evaluation of lists, so one can assign
576                 infinite lists to variables and use them as arguments to functions, but unlike
577                 Haskell and Miranda, Perl 6 doesn't use lazy evaluation of arithmetic operators
578                 and functions by default.
579
580                 Delayed evaluation has the advantage of being able to create calculable
581                 infinite lists without infinite loops or size matters interfering in
582                 computation. For example, one could create a function that creates an infinite
583                 list (often called a stream) of Fibonacci numbers. The calculation of the n-th
584                 Fibonacci number would be merely the extraction of that element from the
585                 infinite list, forcing the evaluation of only the first n members of the list.
586
587                 For example, in Haskell, the list of all Fibonacci numbers can be written as
588
589                  fibs = 0 : 1 : zipWith (+) fibs (tail fibs)
590
591                 In Haskell syntax, ":" prepends an element to a list, tail returns a list
592                 without its first element, and zipWith uses a specified function (in this case
593                 addition) to combine corresponding elements of two lists to produce a third.
594
595                 Provided the programmer is careful, only the values that are required to
596                 produce a particular result are evaluated. However, certain calculations may
597                 result in the program attempting to evaluate an infinite number of elements;
598                 for example, requesting the length of the list or trying to sum the elements of
599                 the list with a fold operation would result in the program either failing to
600                 terminate or running out of memory. [edit] Control structures
601
602                 Even in most eager languages if statements evaluate in a lazy fashion.
603
604                 if a then b else c
605
606                 evaluates (a), then if and only if (a) evaluates to true does it evaluate (b),
607                 otherwise it evaluates (c). That is, either (b) or (c) will not be evaluated.
608                 Conversely, in an eager language the expected behavior is that
609
610                 define f(x,y) = 2*x set k = f(e,5)
611
612                 will still evaluate (e) and (f) when computing (k). However, user-defined
613                 control structures depend on exact syntax, so for example
614
615                 define g(a,b,c) = if a then b else c l = g(h,i,j)
616
617                 (i) and (j) would both be evaluated in an eager language. While in
618
619                 l' = if h then i else j
620
621                 (i) or (j) would be evaluated, but never both.
622
623                 Lazy evaluation allows control structures to be defined normally, and not as
624                 primitives or compile-time techniques. If (i) or (j) have side effects or
625                 introduce run time errors, the subtle differences between (l) and (l') can be
626                 complex. As most programming languages are Turing-complete, it is of course
627                 possible to introduce lazy control structures in eager languages, either as
628                 built-ins like C's ternary operator ?: or by other techniques such as clever
629                 use of lambdas, or macros.
630
631                 Short-circuit evaluation of Boolean control structures is sometimes called
632                 "lazy". [edit] Controlling eagerness in lazy languages
633
634                 In lazy programming languages such as Haskell, although the default is to
635                 evaluate expressions only when they are demanded, it is possible in some cases
636                 to make code more eager—or conversely, to make it more lazy again after it has
637                 been made more eager. This can be done by explicitly coding something which
638                 forces evaluation (which may make the code more eager) or avoiding such code
639                 (which may make the code more lazy). Strict evaluation usually implies
640                 eagerness, but they are technically different concepts.
641
642                 However, there is an optimisation implemented in some compilers called
643                 strictness analysis, which, in some cases, allows the compiler to infer that a
644                 value will always be used. In such cases, this may render the programmer's
645                 choice of whether to force that particular value or not, irrelevant, because
646                 strictness analysis will force strict evaluation.
647
648                 In Haskell, marking constructor fields strict means that their values will
649                 always be demanded immediately. The seq function can also be used to demand a
650                 value immediately and then pass it on, which is useful if a constructor field
651                 should generally be lazy. However, neither of these techniques implements
652                 recursive strictness—for that, a function called deepSeq was invented.
653
654                 Also, pattern matching in Haskell 98 is strict by default, so the ~ qualifier
655                 has to be used to make it lazy. [edit] 
656
657
658
659
660 confluence/Church-Rosser
661
662
663 "combinators", useful ones:
664
665
666 composition
667 n-ary[sic] composition
668 "fold-based"[sic] representation of numbers
669 defining some operations, not yet predecessor
670         iszero,succ,add,mul,...?
671
672 lists?
673         explain differences between list and tuple (and stream)
674                 FIFO queue,LIFO stack,etc...
675 "pair-based" representation of lists (1,2,3)
676 nil,cons,isnil,head,tail
677
678 explain operations like "map","filter","fold_left","fold_right","length","reverse"
679 but we're not yet in position to implement them because we don't know how to recurse
680
681 Another way to do lists is based on model of how we did numbers
682 "fold-based" representation of lists
683 One virtue is we can do some recursion by exploiting the fold-based structure of our implementation; don't (yet) need a general method for recursion
684
685 Go back to numbers, how to do predecessor? (a few ways)
686 For some purposes may be easier (to program,more efficient) to use "pair-based" representation of numbers
687 ("More efficient" but these are still base-1 representations of numbers!)
688 In this case, too you'd need a general method for recursion
689 (You could also have a hybrid, pair-and-fold based representation of numbers, and a hybrid, pair-and-fold based representation of lists. Works quite well.)
690
691 Recursion
692 Even if we have fold-based representation of numbers, and predecessor/equal/subtraction, some recursive functions are going to be out of our reach
693 Need a general method, where f(n) doesn't just depend on f(n-1) (or <f(n-1),f(n-2),...>). Example?
694
695 How to do with recursion with omega.
696
697
698 Next week: fixed point combinators
699
700