week7 tweak
[lambda.git] / towards_monads.mdwn
1 Dividing by zero
2 ----------------
3
4 Integer division presupposes that its second argument
5 (the divisor) is not zero, upon pain of presupposition failure.
6 Here's what my OCaml interpreter says:
7
8     # 12/0;;
9     Exception: Division_by_zero.
10
11 So we want to explicitly allow for the possibility that
12 division will return something other than a number.
13 We'll use OCaml's `option` type, which works like this:
14
15     # type 'a option = None | Some of 'a;;
16     # None;;
17     - : 'a option = None
18     # Some 3;;
19     - : int option = Some 3
20
21 So if a division is normal, we return some number, but if the divisor is
22 zero, we return `None`. As a mnemonic aid, we'll append a `'` to the end of our new divide function.
23
24 <pre>
25 let div' (x:int) (y:int) =
26   match y with
27           0 -> None
28     | _ -> Some (x / y);;
29
30 (*
31 val div' : int -> int -> int option = fun
32 # div' 12 2;;
33 - : int option = Some 6
34 # div' 12 0;;
35 - : int option = None
36 # div' (div' 12 2) 3;;
37 Characters 4-14:
38   div' (div' 12 2) 3;;
39         ^^^^^^^^^^
40 Error: This expression has type int option
41        but an expression was expected of type int
42 *)
43 </pre>
44
45 This starts off well: dividing 12 by 2, no problem; dividing 12 by 0,
46 just the behavior we were hoping for.  But we want to be able to use
47 the output of the safe-division function as input for further division
48 operations.  So we have to jack up the types of the inputs:
49
50 <pre>
51 let div' (u:int option) (v:int option) =
52   match v with
53           None -> None
54     | Some 0 -> None
55         | Some y -> (match u with
56                                           None -> None
57                     | Some x -> Some (x / y));;
58
59 (*
60 val div' : int option -> int option -> int option = <fun>
61 # div' (Some 12) (Some 2);;
62 - : int option = Some 6
63 # div' (Some 12) (Some 0);;
64 - : int option = None
65 # div' (div' (Some 12) (Some 0)) (Some 3);;
66 - : int option = None
67 *)
68 </pre>
69
70 Beautiful, just what we need: now we can try to divide by anything we
71 want, without fear that we're going to trigger any system errors.
72
73 I prefer to line up the `match` alternatives by using OCaml's
74 built-in tuple type:
75
76 <pre>
77 let div' (u:int option) (v:int option) =
78   match (u, v) with
79           (None, _) -> None
80     | (_, None) -> None
81     | (_, Some 0) -> None
82         | (Some x, Some y) -> Some (x / y);;
83 </pre>
84
85 So far so good.  But what if we want to combine division with
86 other arithmetic operations?  We need to make those other operations
87 aware of the possibility that one of their arguments has triggered a
88 presupposition failure:
89
90 <pre>
91 let add' (u:int option) (v:int option) =
92   match (u, v) with
93           (None, _) -> None
94     | (_, None) -> None
95     | (Some x, Some y) -> Some (x + y);;
96
97 (*
98 val add' : int option -> int option -> int option = <fun>
99 # add' (Some 12) (Some 4);;
100 - : int option = Some 16
101 # add' (div' (Some 12) (Some 0)) (Some 4);;
102 - : int option = None
103 *)
104 </pre>
105
106 This works, but is somewhat disappointing: the `add'` operation
107 doesn't trigger any presupposition of its own, so it is a shame that
108 it needs to be adjusted because someone else might make trouble.
109
110 But we can automate the adjustment.  The standard way in OCaml,
111 Haskell, etc., is to define a `bind` operator (the name `bind` is not
112 well chosen to resonate with linguists, but what can you do). To continue our mnemonic association, we'll put a `'` after the name "bind" as well.
113
114 <pre>
115 let bind' (u: int option) (f: int -> (int option)) =
116   match u with
117           None -> None
118     | Some x -> f x;;
119
120 let add' (u: int option) (v: int option)  =
121   bind' u (fun x -> bind' v (fun y -> Some (x + y)));;
122
123 let div' (u: int option) (v: int option) =
124   bind' u (fun x -> bind' v (fun y -> if (0 = y) then None else Some (x / y)));;
125
126 (*
127 #  div' (div' (Some 12) (Some 2)) (Some 3);;
128 - : int option = Some 2
129 #  div' (div' (Some 12) (Some 0)) (Some 3);;
130 - : int option = None
131 # add' (div' (Some 12) (Some 0)) (Some 3);;
132 - : int option = None
133 *)
134 </pre>
135
136 Compare the new definitions of `add'` and `div'` closely: the definition
137 for `add'` shows what it looks like to equip an ordinary operation to
138 survive in dangerous presupposition-filled world.  Note that the new
139 definition of `add'` does not need to test whether its arguments are
140 None objects or real numbers---those details are hidden inside of the
141 `bind'` function.
142
143 The definition of `div'` shows exactly what extra needs to be said in
144 order to trigger the no-division-by-zero presupposition.
145
146 For linguists: this is a complete theory of a particularly simply form
147 of presupposition projection (every predicate is a hole).
148