add comments
[lambda.git] / topics / week3_combinatory_logic.mdwn
1 Combinators and Combinatory Logic
2 =================================
3
4 Combinatory logic is of interest here in part because it provides a
5 useful computational system that is equivalent to the Lambda Calculus,
6 but different from it. In addition, Combinatory Logic has a number of
7 applications in natural language semantics.  Exploring Combinatory
8 Logic will involve defining a notion of reduction different from the
9 one we have been using for the Lambda Calculus.  This will provide us
10 with a second parallel example when we're thinking through
11 topics such as evaluation strategies and recursion.
12
13 Lambda expressions that have no free variables are known as **combinators**. Here are some common ones:
14
15 >   **I** is defined to be `\x x`
16
17 >   **K** is defined to be `\x y. x`. That is, it throws away its
18 second argument. So `K x` is a constant function from any
19 (further) argument to `x`. ("K" for "constant".) Compare `K`
20 to our definition of `true`.
21
22 >   **S** is defined to be `\f g x. f x (g x)`.  This is a more
23 complicated operation, but is extremely versatile and useful
24 (see below): it copies its third argument and distributes it
25 over the first two arguments.
26
27 >   **fst** was our function for extracting the first element of an ordered pair: `\a b. a`. Compare this to `K` and `true` as well.
28
29 >   **snd** was our function for extracting the second element of an ordered pair: `\a b. b`. Compare this to our definition of `false`.
30
31 >   **B** is defined to be: `\f g x. f (g x)`. (So `B f g` is the composition `\x. f (g x)` of `f` and `g`.)
32
33 >   **C** is defined to be: `\f x y. f y x`. (So `C f` is a function like `f` except it expects its first two (curried) arguments in flipped order.)
34
35 >   **T** is defined to be: `\x y. y x`. (So `C` and `T` both reorder arguments, just in different ways.)
36
37 >   **W** is defined to be: `\f x . f x x`. (So `W f` accepts one argument and gives it to `f` twice. What is the meaning of `W multiply`?) <!-- \x. multiply x x ≡ \x. square x -->
38
39 >   **ω** (that is, lower-case omega) is defined to be: `\x. x x`. Sometimes this combinator is called **M**. It and `W` both duplicate arguments, just in different ways. <!-- L is \hu.h(uu) -->
40
41
42 It's possible to build a logical system equally powerful as the Lambda
43 Calculus (and readily intertranslatable with it) using just
44 combinators, considered as *primitive operations*. (That is, we
45 refrain from defining them in terms of lambda expressions, as we did
46 above.)  Such a language doesn't have any variables in it: not just no
47 free variables, but no variables (or "bound positions") at all.
48
49 One can do that with a very spare set of basic combinators. These days
50 the standard base is just three combinators: `S`, `K`, and `I`.
51 (Though we'll see shortly that the behavior of `I` can be exactly
52 simulated by a combination of `S`'s and `K`'s.)  But it's possible to be
53 even more minimalistic, and get by with only a single combinator (see
54 links below for details). (And there are different single-combinator
55 bases you can choose.) <!-- Schoenfinkel already discovered one of them;
56 did Chris discover his? -->
57
58 There are some well-known linguistic applications of Combinatory
59 Logic, due to Anna Szabolcsi, Mark Steedman, and Pauline Jacobson.
60 They claim that natural language semantics is a combinatory system: that every
61 natural language denotation is a combinator.
62
63 For instance, Szabolcsi 1987 argues that reflexive pronouns are argument
64 duplicators.
65
66     everyone   hit           himself
67     S/(S!NP)   (S!NP)/NP     (S!NP)!((S!NP)/NP)
68     \f∀x[fx]   \y\z[HIT y z] \h\u[huu]
69                --------------------------------- here "hit" is an argument to "himself"
70                       S!NP     \u[HIT u u]
71     -------------------------------------------- here "hit himself" is an argument to "everyone"
72                       S        ∀x[HIT x x]
73
74 Notice that the semantic value of *himself* is exactly `W`.  The reflexive
75 pronoun in direct object position combines with the transitive verb "hit".  The
76 result is an intransitive verb phrase "hit himself" that takes a subject argument `u`, duplicates
77 that argument, and feeds the two copies to the transitive verb meaning.
78
79 Note that `W <~~> S(CI)`:
80
81     S(CI) ≡
82     S ((\f x y. f y x) (\x x)) ~~>
83     S (\x y. (\x x) y x) ~~>
84     S (\x y. y x) ≡
85     (\f g x. f x (g x)) (\x y. y x) ~~>
86     \g x. (\x y. y x) x (g x) ~~>
87     \g x. (g x) x ≡
88     W
89
90 ###A different set of reduction rules###
91
92 Instead of defining combinators in terms of antecedently understood lambda terms, we want to consider the view that takes the combinators as primitive, and understands them in terms of *what they do*. If we have the `I` combinator followed by any expression `X`,
93 `I` will take that expression as its argument and return that same expression as the result.  Diagrammatically:
94
95     IX ~~> X
96
97 That is, asume that `X` stands in for any expression.  Then if `X`
98 happens to be the expression `I`, this schematic pattern guarantees
99 that `II ~~> I`; if `X` happens to be the expression `SK`, the pattern
100 guarantees that `I(SK) ~~> SK`; and so on.  That is, `X` here is a
101 metavariable over expressions.
102
103 Thinking of this as a reduction rule, we can perform the following computation:
104
105     II(IX) ~~> I(IX) ~~> IX ~~> X
106
107 The reduction rule for `K` is also straightforward:
108
109     KXY ~~> X
110
111 That is, `K` throws away its second argument.  The reduction rule for `S` can be constructed by examining
112 the defining lambda term:
113
114     S ≡ \f g x. f x (g x)
115
116 `S` takes three arguments, duplicates the third argument, and feeds one copy to the first argument and the second copy to the second argument.  So:
117
118     SFGX ~~> FX(GX)
119
120 If the meaning of a function is nothing more than how it behaves with respect to its arguments,
121 these reduction rules capture the behavior of the combinators `S`, `K`, and `I` completely.
122 We can use these rules to compute without resorting to beta reduction.
123
124 For instance, we can show how the `I` combinator's behavior is simulated by a
125 certain crafty combination of `S`s and `K`s:
126
127     SKKX ~~> KX(KX) ~~> X
128
129 So the combinator `SKK` is equivalent to the combinator `I`. (Really, it could be `SKY` for any `Y`. Hindley &amp; Seldin p. 26 points to discussion later in their book of why it's theoretically more elegant to keep `I` around, anyway.)
130
131 These reduction rule have the same status with respect to Combinatory
132 Logic as beta-reduction and eta-reduction have with respect to
133 the Lambda Calculus: they are purely syntactic rules for transforming
134 one sequence of symbols (e.g., a redex) into another (a reduced
135 form).  It's worth noting that the reduction rules for Combinatory
136 Logic are considerably more simple than, say, beta reduction.  Also, since
137 there are no variables in Combinatory Logic, there is no need to worry
138 about variables colliding when we substitute.
139
140 Combinatory Logic is what you have when you choose a set of
141 combinators and regulate their behavior with a set of reduction
142 rules. As we said, the most common system uses `S`, `K`, and `I` as
143 defined here.
144
145 ###The equivalence of the untyped Lambda Calculus and Combinatory Logic###
146
147 We've claimed that Combinatory Logic is "equivalent to" the Lambda Calculus.  If
148 that's so, then `S`, `K`, and `I` must be enough to accomplish any computational task
149 imaginable.  Actually, `S` and `K` must suffice, since we've just seen that we can
150 simulate `I` using only `S` and `K`.  In order to get an intuition about what it
151 takes to be Turing Complete, <!-- FIXME -->
152 recall our discussion of the Lambda Calculus in
153 terms of a text editor.  A text editor has the power to transform any arbitrary
154 text into any other arbitrary text.
155 The way it does this is by deleting, copying, and reordering characters.  We've
156 already seen that `K` deletes its second argument, so we have deletion covered.
157 `S` duplicates and reorders, so we have some reason to hope that `S` and `K` are
158 enough to define arbitrary functions.
159
160 We've already established that the behavior of combinatory terms can be
161 perfectly mimicked by lambda terms: just replace each combinator with its
162 equivalent lambda term, i.e., replace `I` with `\x. x`, replace `K` with `\x y. x`,
163 and replace `S` with `\f g x. f x (g x)`.  So the behavior of any combination of
164 combinators in Combinatory Logic can be exactly reproduced by a lambda term.
165
166 How about the other direction?  Here is a method for converting an arbitrary
167 lambda term into an equivalent Combinatory Logic term using only `S`, `K`, and `I`.
168 Besides the intrinsic beauty of such mappings, and the importance of what it
169 says about the nature of binding and computation, it is possible to hear an
170 echo of computing with continuations in this conversion strategy (though you
171 wouldn't be able to hear these echos until we've covered a considerable portion
172 of the rest of the course).  In addition, there is a direct linguistic
173 application of this mapping in chapter 17 of Barker and Shan 2014, where it is
174 used to establish a correspondence between two natural language grammars, one
175 of which is based on lambda-like abstraction, the other of which is based on
176 Combinatory Logic-like manipulations.
177
178 <!--
179 Assume that for any lambda term T, [T] is the equivalent Combinatory Logic term.  Then we can define the [.] mapping as follows:
180  
181     1. [a]               a
182     2. [(M N)]           ([M][N])
183     3. [\a.a]            I
184     4. [\a.M]            K[M]                 when a does not occur free in M
185     5. [\a.(M N)]        S[\a.M][\a.N]
186     6. [\a\b.M]          [\a[\b.M]]
187  
188 If the recursive unpacking of these rules ever direct you to "translate" an `S` or a `K` or an `I`, introduced at an earlier stage of translation, those symbols translate themselves.
189  
190 It's easy to understand these rules based on what `S`, `K` and `I` do.
191  
192 The first rule says that variables are mapped to themselves. If the original lambda expression had no free variables in it, then any such translations will only be temporary. The variable will later get eliminated by the application of other rules. (If the original lambda term *does* have free variables in it, so too will the final Combinatory Logic translation.  Feel free to worry about this, though you should be confident that it makes sense.)
193  
194 The second rule says that the way to translate an application is to translate the first element and the second element separately.
195  
196 The third rule should be obvious.
197  
198 The fourth rule should also be fairly self-evident: since what a lambda term such as `\x. y` does it throw away its first argument and return `y`, that's exactly what the Combinatory Logic translation should do.  And indeed, `K y` is a function that throws away its argument and returns `y`.
199
200 The fifth rule deals with an abstract whose body is an application: the `S` combinator takes its next argument (which will fill the role of the original variable a) and copies it, feeding one copy to the translation of `\a. M`, and the other copy to the translation of `\a. N`.  This ensures that any free occurrences of a inside `M` or `N` will end up taking on the appropriate value.
201
202 Finally, the last rule says that if the body of an abstract is itself an abstract, translate the inner abstract first, and then do the outermost.  (Since the translation of `[\b. M]` will have eliminated any inner lambdas, we can be sure that we won't end up applying rule 6 again in an infinite loop.)
203  
204 Persuade yourself that if the original lambda term contains no free variables --- i.e., is a combinator --- then the translation will consist only of `S`, `K`, and `I` (plus parentheses).
205
206 (Fussy note: this translation algorithm builds intermediate expressions that combine lambdas with primitive combinators.  For instance, the translation of our boolean `false` (`\x y. y`) is `[\x [\y. y]] = [\x. I] = KI`.  In the intermediate stage, we have `\x. I`, which has a combinator in the body of a lambda abstract.  It's possible to avoid this if you want to,  but it takes some careful thought.  See, e.g., Barendregt 1984, page 156.)
207
208 ...
209 Here's a more elaborate example of the translation.  Let's say we want to establish that combinators can reverse order, so we use the **T** combinator (`\x y. y x`):
210
211     [\x y. y x] =
212     [\x [\y. y x]] =
213     [\x. S [\y. y] [\y. x]] = 
214     [\x. (SI) (K x)] =
215     S [\x. SI] [\x. K x] =
216     S (K(SI)) (S [\x. K] [\x. x]) =
217     S (K(SI)) (S(KK)I)
218 -->
219
220 (*Warning* This is a different mapping from the Lambda Calculus to Combinatory Logic than we presented in class (and was posted here earlier). It now matches the presentation in Barendregt 1984, and in Hankin Chapter 4 (esp. pp. 61, 65) and in Hindley &amp; Seldin Chapter 2 (esp. p. 26). In some ways this translation is cleaner and more elegant, which is why we're presenting it.)
221
222 In order to establish the correspondence, we need to get a bit more
223 official about what counts as an expression in CL. Of course, we count
224 the primitive combinators `S`, `K`, and `I` as expressions in CL. But
225 we will also endow CL with an infinite stock of *variable symbols*, just like the lambda
226 calculus, including `x`, `y`, and `z`. Finally, `(XY)` is in CL for any CL
227 expressions `X` and `Y`.  So examples of CL expressions include
228 `x`, `(xy)`, `Sx`, `SK`, `(x(SK))`, `(K(IS))`, and so on.  When we 
229 omit parentheses, we assume left associativity, so
230 `XYZ ≡ ((XY)Z)`.
231
232 It may seem weird to allow variables in CL.  The reason this is
233 necessary is because we're trying to show that *every* lambda term can
234 be translated into an equivalent CL term.  Since some lambda terms
235 contain *free* variables, we need to provide a translation in CL for those free
236 variables. As you might expect, it will turn out that whenever the
237 lambda term in question contains *no* free variables (i.e., is a Lambda Calculus
238 combinator), its translation in CL will *also* contain no variables, but will
239 instead just be made up of primitive combinators and parentheses.
240
241 Let's say that for any lambda term T, [T] is the equivalent Combinatory
242 Logic term. Then we define the [.] mapping as follows. 
243
244      1. [a]          =   a
245      2. [(\aX)]      =   @a[X]
246      3. [(XY)]       =   ([X][Y])
247
248 Wait, what is that `@a ...` business? Well, that's another operation on (a variable and) a CL expression, that we can define like this:
249
250      4. @aa          =   I
251      5. @aX          =   KX           if a is not in X
252      6. @a(Xa)       =   X            if a is not in X
253      7. @a(XY)       =   S(@aX)(@aY)
254
255 Think of `@aX` as a pseudo-lambda abstract. (Hankin and Barendregt write it as <code>&lambda;*a. X</code>; Hindley &amp; Seldin write it as `[a] X`.) It is possible to omit line 6, and some presentations do, but Hindley &amp; Seldin observe that this "enormously increases" the length of "most" translations.
256
257 It's easy to understand these rules based on what `S`, `K` and `I` do.
258
259 Rule (1) says that variables are mapped to themselves. If the original
260 lambda expression had no free variables in it, then any such
261 translations will only be temporary. The variable will later get
262 eliminated by the application of other rules.
263
264 Rule (2) says that the way to translate an application is to
265 first translate the body (i.e., `[X]`), and then prefix a kind of
266 temporary psuedo-lambda built from `@` and the original variable.
267
268 Rule (3) says that the translation of an application of `X` to `Y` is
269 the application of the translation of `X` to the translation of `Y`.
270
271 As we'll see, the first three rules sweep through the lambda term,
272 changing each lambda to an @.
273
274 Rules (4) through (7) tell us how to eliminate all the `@`'s.
275
276 In rule (4), if we have `@aa`, we need a CL expression that behaves
277 like the lambda term `\aa`.  Obviously, `I` is the right choice here.
278
279 In rule (5), if we're binding into an expression that doesn't contain
280 any variables that need binding, then we need a CL term that behaves
281 the same as `\aX` would if `X` didn't contain `a` as a free variable.
282 Well, how does `\aX` behave?  When `\aX` occurs in the head position
283 of a redex, then no matter what argument it occurs with, it throws
284 away its argument and returns `X`.  In other words, `\aX` is a
285 constant function returning `X`, which is exactly the behavior
286 we get by prefixing `K`.
287
288 Rule (6) should be intuitive; and as we said, we could in principle omit it and just handle such cases under the final rule.
289
290 The easiest way to grasp rule (7) is to consider the following claim:
291
292     \a(XY) <~~> S(\aX)(\aY) 
293
294 To prove it to yourself, just consider what would happen when each term is applied to an argument `a`. Or substitute `\x y a. x a (y a)` in for `S`
295 and reduce.
296
297 Persuade yourself that if the original lambda term contains no free
298 variables --- i.e., is a Lambda Calculus combinator --- then the translation will
299 consist only of `S`, `K`, and `I` (plus parentheses).
300
301 Various, slightly differing translation schemes from Combinatory Logic to the
302 Lambda Calculus are also possible. These generate different meta-theoretical
303 correspondences between the two calculi. Consult Hindley &amp; Seldin for
304 details.
305
306 Also, note that the combinatorial proof theory needs to be
307 strengthened with axioms beyond anything we've here described in order to make
308 `[M]` convertible with `[N]` whenever the original lambda-terms `M` and `N` are
309 convertible.  But then, we've been a bit cavalier about giving the full set of
310 reduction rules for the Lambda Calculus in a similar way.  <!-- FIXME -->
311
312 For instance, one issue we mentioned in the notes on [[Reduction
313 Strategies|week3_reduction_strategies]] is whether reduction rules (in
314 either the Lambda Calculus or Combinatory Logic) apply to embedded
315 expressions.  Often, we do want that to happen, but making it happen
316 requires adding explicit axioms.
317
318 Let's see the translation rules in action.  We'll start by translating
319 the combinator we use to represent false:
320
321        [\y (\n n)] 
322     ==  @y [\n n]      rule 2
323     ==  @y (@n n)      rule 2
324     ==  @y I           rule 4
325     ==    KI           rule 5
326    
327 Let's check that the translation of the `false` boolean behaves as expected by feeding it two arbitrary arguments:
328
329     KIXY ~~> IY ~~> Y
330
331 Throws away the first argument, returns the second argument---yep, it works.
332
333 Here's a more elaborate example of the translation.  Let's say we want
334 to establish that combinators can reverse order, so we set out to
335 translate the **T** combinator (`\x y. y x`):
336
337        [\x(\y(yx))]
338     ==  @x[\y(yx)]
339     ==  @x(@y[yx])
340     ==  @x(@y([y][x]))
341     ==  @x(@y(yx))
342     ==  @x(S(@yy)(@yx))
343     ==  @x(S I   (@yx))
344     ==  @x(S I    (Kx))
345     ==     S(@x(SI))(@x(Kx))
346     ==     S (K(SI))(S(@xK)(@xx))
347     ==     S (K(SI))(S (KK) I)
348
349 By now, you should realize that all rules (1) through (3) do is sweep
350 through the lambda term turning lambdas into @'s.  
351
352 We can test this translation by seeing if it behaves like the original lambda term does.
353 The original lambda term "lifts" its first argument `x`, in the sense of wrapping it into a "one-tuple" or a package that accepts an operation `y` as a further argument, and then applies `y` to `x`. (Or just think of **T** as reversing the order of its two arguments.)
354
355     S (K(SI)) (S(KK)I) X Y ~~>
356     (K(SI))X ((S(KK)I) X) Y ~~>
357     SI ((KK)X (IX)) Y ~~>
358     SI (K X) Y ~~>
359     IY (KXY) ~~>
360     Y X
361
362 Voilà: the combinator takes any X and Y as arguments, and returns Y applied to X.
363
364 One very nice property of Combinatory Logic is that there is no need to worry about alphabetic variance, or
365 variable collision---since there are no (bound) variables, there is no possibility of accidental variable capture,
366 and so reduction can be performed without any fear of variable collision.  We haven't mentioned the intricacies of
367 alpha equivalence or safe variable substitution, but they are in fact quite intricate.  (The best way to gain
368 an appreciation of that intricacy is to write a program that performs lambda reduction.)
369
370 Back to linguistic applications: one consequence of the equivalence between the Lambda Calculus and Combinatory
371 Logic is that anything that can be done by binding variables can just as well be done with combinators.
372 This has given rise to a style of semantic analysis called Variable-Free Semantics (in addition to
373 Szabolcsi's papers, see, for instance,
374 Pauline Jacobson's 1999 *Linguistics and Philosophy* paper, "Towards a variable-free Semantics").
375
376 Somewhat ironically, reading strings of combinators is so difficult that most practitioners of variable-free semantics
377 express their meanings using the Lambda Calculus rather than Combinatory Logic. Perhaps they should call their
378 enterprise *Free Variable*-Free Semantics.
379
380 A philosophical connection: Quine went through a phase in which he developed a variable-free logic.
381
382 > Quine, Willard. 1960. "Variables explained away" <cite>Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society</cite>.  Volume 104: 343--347.  Also in W. V. Quine.  1960. <cite>Selected Logical Papers</cite>.  Random House: New York.  227--235.
383
384 The reason this was important to Quine is similar to the worry that using
385 non-referring expressions such as `Santa Claus` might commit one to believing in
386 non-existent things.  Quine's slogan was that "to be is to be the value of a
387 variable."  What this was supposed to mean is that if and only if an object
388 could serve as the value of some variable, we are committed to recognizing the
389 existence of that object in our ontology.  Obviously, if there *are* no
390 variables, this slogan has to be rethought.
391
392 Quine did not appear to appreciate that Shoenfinkel had already invented Combinatory Logic, though
393 he later wrote an introduction to Shoenfinkel's key paper reprinted in Jean
394 van Heijenoort (ed) 1967 <cite>From Frege to Goedel, a source book in mathematical logic, 1879--1931</cite>.
395
396 Cresswell also developed a variable-free approach of some philosophical and linguistic interest
397 in two books in the 1990s.
398
399 A final linguistic application: Steedman's Combinatory Categorial Grammar, where the "Combinatory" is
400 from Combinatory Logic (see especially his 2012 book, <cite>Taking Scope</cite>).  Steedman attempts to build
401 a syntax/semantics interface using a small number of combinators, including `T` (`\x y. y x`), `B` (`\f g x. f (g x)`),
402 and our friend `S`.  Steedman used Smullyan's fanciful bird
403 names for these combinators: Thrush, Bluebird, and Starling.
404
405 Many of these combinatory logics, in particular, the SKI system,
406 are Turing Complete. In other words: every computation we know how to describe can be represented in a logical system consisting of only primitive combinators, even some systems with only a *single* primitive combinator.
407 <!-- FIXME -->
408
409 ###A connection between Combinatory Logic and Sentential Logic###
410
411 The combinators `K` and `S` correspond to two well-known axioms of sentential logic:
412
413     AK: A ⊃ (B ⊃ A)
414     AS: (A ⊃ (B ⊃ C)) ⊃ ((A ⊃ B) ⊃ (A ⊃ C))
415
416 When these two axiom schemas are combined with the rule of modus ponens (from `A` and `A ⊃ B`, conclude `B`), the resulting proof system
417 is complete for the "implicational fragment" of intuitionistic logic. (That is, the part of intuitionistic logic you get when `⊃` is your only connective. To get a complete proof system for *classical* sentential logic, you
418 need only add one more axiom schema, constraining the behavior of a new connective `¬`.)
419 The way we'll favor viewing the relationship between these axioms
420 and the `S` and `K` combinators is that the axioms correspond to *type
421 schemas* for the combinators. This will become more clear once we have
422 a theory of types in view.
423
424 Here's more to read about Combinatory Logic. Surely the most entertaining exposition is Smullyan's [[!wikipedia To_Mock_a_Mockingbird]].
425 Other sources include:
426
427 *   [[!wikipedia Combinatory logic]] at Wikipedia
428 *   [Combinatory logic](http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/logic-combinatory/) at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
429 *   [[!wikipedia SKI combinatory calculus]]
430 *   [[!wikipedia B,C,K,W system]]
431 *   [Chris Barker's Iota and Jot](http://semarch.linguistics.fas.nyu.edu/barker/Iota/)
432 *   Jeroen Fokker, "The Systematic Construction of a One-combinator Basis for Lambda-Terms" <cite>Formal Aspects of Computing</cite> 4 (1992), pp. 776-780. <http://people.cs.uu.nl/jeroen/article/combinat/combinat.ps>