add <a id=little-h>
[lambda.git] / topics / _week3_eval_order.mdwn
1
2 Evaluation Strategies and Normalization
3 =======================================
4
5 In the assignment we asked you to reduce various expressions until it wasn't possible to reduce them any further. For two of those expressions, this was impossible to do. One of them was this:
6
7         (\x. x x) (\x. x x)
8
9 As we saw above, each of the halves of this formula are the combinator <code>&omega;</code>; so this can also be written:
10
11 <pre><code>&omega; &omega;</code></pre>
12
13 This compound expression---the self-application of <code>&omega;</code>---is named &Omega;. It has the form of an application of an abstract (<code>&omega;</code>) to an argument (which also happens to be <code>&omega;</code>), so it's a redex and can be reduced. But when we reduce it, we get <code>&omega; &omega;</code> again. So there's no stage at which this expression has been reduced to a point where it can't be reduced any further. In other words, evaluation of this expression "never terminates." (This is the standard language, however it has the unfortunate connotation that evaluation is a process or operation that is performed in time. You shouldn't think of it like that. Evaluation of this expression "never terminates" in the way that the decimal expansion of &pi; never terminates. These are static, atemporal facts about their mathematical properties.)
14
15 There are infinitely many formulas in the lambda calculus that have this same property. &Omega; is the syntactically simplest of them. In our meta-theory, it's common to assign such formulas a special value, <big><code>&perp;</code></big>, pronounced "bottom." When we get to discussing types, you'll see that this value is counted as belonging to every type. To say that a formula has the bottom value means that the computation that formula represents never terminates and so doesn't evaluate to any orthodox, computed value.
16
17 From a "Fregean" or "weak Kleene" perspective, if any component of an expression fails to be evaluable (to an orthodox, computed value), then the whole expression should be unevaluable as well.
18
19 However, in some such cases it seems *we could* sensibly carry on evaluation. For instance, consider:
20
21 <pre><code>
22 (\x. y) (&omega; &omega;)
23 </code></pre>
24
25 Should we count this as unevaluable, because the reduction of <code>(&omega; &omega;)</code> never terminates? Or should we count it as evaluating to `y`?
26
27 This question highlights that there are different choices to make about how evaluation or computation proceeds. It's helpful to think of three questions in this neighborhood:
28
29 >       Q1. When arguments are complex, as <code>(&omega; &omega;)</code> is, do we reduce them before substituting them into the abstracts to which they are arguments, or later?
30
31 >       Q2. Are we allowed to reduce inside abstracts? That is, can we reduce:
32
33 >               (\x y. x z) (\x. x)
34
35 >       only this far:
36
37 >               \y. (\x. x) z
38
39 >       or can we continue reducing to:
40
41 >               \y. z
42
43 >       Q3. Are we allowed to "eta-reduce"? That is, can we reduce expressions of the form:
44
45 >               \x. M x
46
47 >       where x does not occur free in `M`, to `M`?
48
49 With regard to Q3, it should be intuitively clear that `\x. M x` and `M` will behave the same with respect to any arguments they are given. It can also be proven that no other functions can behave differently with respect to them. However, the logical system you get when eta-reduction is added to the proof theory is importantly different from the one where only beta-reduction is permitted.
50
51 If we answer Q2 by permitting reduction inside abstracts, and we also permit eta-reduction, then where none of <code>y<sub>1</sub>, ..., y<sub>n</sub></code> occur free in M, this:
52
53 <pre><code>\x y<sub>1</sub>... y<sub>n</sub>. M y<sub>1</sub>... y<sub>n</sub></code></pre>
54
55 will eta-reduce by n steps to:
56
57         \x. M
58
59 When we add eta-reduction to our proof system, we end up reconstruing the meaning of `~~>` and `<~~>` and "normal form", all in terms that permit eta-reduction as well. Sometimes these expressions will be annotated to indicate whether only beta-reduction is allowed (<code>~~><sub>&beta;</sub></code>) or whether both beta- and eta-reduction is allowed (<code>~~><sub>&beta;&eta;</sub></code>).
60
61 The logical system you get when eta-reduction is added to the proof system has the following property:
62
63 >       if `M`, `N` are normal forms with no free variables, then <code>M &equiv; N</code> iff `M` and `N` behave the same with respect to every possible sequence of arguments.
64
65 This implies that, when `M` and `N` are (closed normal forms that are) syntactically distinct, there will always be some sequences of arguments <code>L<sub>1</sub>, ..., L<sub>n</sub></code> such that:
66
67 <pre><code>M L<sub>1</sub> ... L<sub>n</sub> x y ~~> x
68 N L<sub>1</sub> ... L<sub>n</sub> x y ~~> y
69 </code></pre>
70
71 So closed beta-plus-eta-normal forms will be syntactically different iff they yield different values for some arguments. That is, iff their extensions differ.
72
73 So the proof theory with eta-reduction added is called "extensional," because its notion of normal form makes syntactic identity of closed normal forms coincide with extensional equivalence.
74
75 See Hindley and Seldin, Chapters 7-8 and 14, for discussion of what should count as capturing the "extensionality" of these systems, and some outstanding issues.
76
77
78 The evaluation strategy which answers Q1 by saying "reduce arguments first" is known as **call-by-value**. The evaluation strategy which answers Q1 by saying "substitute arguments in unreduced" is known as **call-by-name** or **call-by-need** (the difference between these has to do with efficiency, not semantics).
79
80 When one has a call-by-value strategy that also permits reduction to continue inside unapplied abstracts, that's known as "applicative order" reduction. When one has a call-by-name strategy that permits reduction inside abstracts, that's known as "normal order" reduction. Consider an expression of the form:
81
82         ((A B) (C D)) (E F)
83
84 Its syntax has the following tree:
85
86           ((A B) (C D)) (E F)
87                    /     \
88                   /       \
89         ((A B) (C D))  \
90                 /\        (E F)
91            /  \        /\
92           /    \      E  F
93         (A B) (C D)
94          /\    /\
95         /  \  /  \
96         A   B C   D
97
98 Applicative order evaluation does what's called a "post-order traversal" of the tree: that is, we always go down when we can, first to the left, and we process a node only after processing all its children. So `(C D)` gets processed before `((A B) (C D))` does, and `(E F)` gets processed before `((A B) (C D)) (E F)` does.
99
100 Normal order evaluation, on the other hand, will substitute the expresion `(C D)` into the abstract that `(A B)` evaluates to, without first trying to compute what `(C D)` evaluates to. That computation may be done later.
101
102 With normal-order evaluation (or call-by-name more generally), if we have an expression like:
103
104         (\x. y) (C D)
105
106 the computation of `(C D)` won't ever have to be performed. Instead, `(\x. y) (C D)` reduces directly to `y`. This is so even if `(C D)` is the non-evaluable <code>(&omega; &omega;)</code>!
107
108 Call-by-name evaluation is often called "lazy." Call-by-value evaluation is also often called "eager" or "strict". Some authors say these terms all have subtly different technical meanings, but I haven't been able to figure out what it is. Perhaps the technical meaning of "strict" is what I above called the "Fregean" or "weak Kleene" perspective: if any argument of a function is non-evaluable or non-normalizing, so too is the application of the function to that argument.
109
110
111 Most programming languages, including Scheme and OCaml, use the call-by-value evaluation strategy. (But they don't permit evaluation to continue inside an unappplied function.) There are techniques for making them model call-by-name evaluation, when necessary. But by default, arguments will always be evaluated before being bound to the parameters (the `\x`s) of a function.
112
113 For languages like Scheme that permit functions to take more than one argument at a time, a further question arises: whether the multiple arguments are evaluated left-to-right, or right-to-left, or nothing is guaranteed about what order they are evaluated in. Different languages make different choices about this.
114
115 Some functional programming languages, such as Haskell, use the call-by-name evaluation strategy.
116
117 The lambda calculus can be evaluated either way. You have to decide what the rules shall be.
118
119 As we'll see in several weeks, there are techniques for *forcing* call-by-value evaluation of a computation, and also techniques for forcing call-by-name evaluation. If you liked, you could even have a nested hierarchy, where blocks at each level were forced to be evaluated in alternating ways.
120
121 Call-by-value and call-by-name have different pros and cons.
122
123 One important advantage of normal-order evaluation in particular is that it can compute orthodox values for:
124
125 <pre><code>
126 (\x. y) (&omega; &omega;)<p>
127 \z. (\x. y) (&omega; &omega;)
128 </code></pre>
129
130 Indeed, it's provable that if there's *any* reduction path that delivers a value for a given expression, the normal-order evalutation strategy will terminate with that value.
131
132 An expression is said to be in **normal form** when it's not possible to perform any more reductions (not even inside abstracts).
133 There's a sense in which you *can't get anything more out of* <code>&omega; &omega;</code>, but it's not in normal form because it still has the form of a redex.
134
135 A computational system is said to be **confluent**, or to have the **Church-Rosser** or **diamond** property, if, whenever there are multiple possible evaluation paths, those that terminate always terminate in the same value. In such a system, the choice of which sub-expressions to evaluate first will only matter if some of them but not others might lead down a non-terminating path.
136
137 The untyped lambda calculus is confluent. So long as a computation terminates, it always terminates in the same way. It doesn't matter which order the sub-expressions are evaluated in.
138
139 A computational system is said to be **strongly normalizing** if every permitted evaluation path is guaranteed to terminate. The untyped lambda calculus is not strongly normalizing: <code>&omega; &omega;</code> doesn't terminate by any evaluation path; and <code>(\x. y) (&omega; &omega;)</code> terminates only by some evaluation paths but not by others.
140
141 But the untyped lambda calculus enjoys some compensation for this weakness. It's Turing complete! It can represent any computation we know how to describe. (That's the cash value of being Turing complete, not the rigorous definition. There is a rigrous definition. However, we don't know how to rigorously define "any computation we know how to describe.") And in fact, it's been proven that you can't have both. If a computational system is Turing complete, it cannot be strongly normalizing.
142
143 A computational system is said to be **weakly normalizing** if there's always guaranteed to be *at least one* evaluation path that terminates. The untyped lambda calculus is not weakly normalizing either, as we've seen.
144
145 The *typed* lambda calculus that linguists traditionally work with, on the other hand, is strongly normalizing. (And as a result, is not Turing complete.) It has expressive power (concerning types) that the untyped lambda calculus lacks, but it is also unable to represent some (terminating!) computations that the untyped lambda calculus can represent.
146
147 Other more-powerful type systems we'll look at in the course will also fail to be Turing complete, though they will turn out to be pretty powerful.
148
149 Further reading:
150
151 *       [[!wikipedia Evaluation strategy]]
152 *       [[!wikipedia Eager evaluation]]
153 *       [[!wikipedia Lazy evaluation]]
154 *       [[!wikipedia Strict programming language]]<p>
155 *       [[!wikipedia Church-Rosser theorem]]
156 *       [[!wikipedia Normalization property]]
157 *       [[!wikipedia Turing completeness]]
158
159
160 Decidability
161 ============
162
163 The question whether two formulas are syntactically equal is "decidable": we can construct a computation that's guaranteed to always give us the answer.
164
165 What about the question whether two formulas are convertible? Well, to answer that, we just need to reduce them to normal form, if possible, and check whether the results are syntactically equal. The crux is that "if possible." Some computations can't be reduced to normal form. Their evaluation paths never terminate. And if we just kept trying blindly to reduce them, our computation of what they're convertible to would also never terminate.
166
167 So it'd be handy to have some way to check in advance whether a formula has a normal form: whether there's any evaluation path for it that terminates.
168
169 Is it possible to do that? Sure, sometimes. For instance, check whether the formula is syntactically equal to &Omega;. If it is, it never terminates.
170
171 But is there any method for doing this in general---for telling, of any given computation, whether that computation would terminate? Unfortunately, there is not. Church proved this in 1936; Turing also essentially proved it at the same time. Geoff Pullum gives a very reader-friendly outline of the proofs here:
172
173 *       [Scooping the Loop Snooper](http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/teaching/0910/CompTheory/scooping.pdf), a proof of the undecidability of the halting problem in the style of Dr Seuss by Geoffrey K. Pullum
174
175 Interestingly, Church also set up an association between the lambda calculus and first-order predicate logic, such that, for arbitrary lambda formulas `M` and `N`, some formula would be provable in predicate logic iff `M` and `N` were convertible. So since the right-hand side is not decidable, questions of provability in first-order predicate logic must not be decidable either. This was the first proof of the undecidability of first-order predicate logic.
176
177
178 ##More on evaluation strategies##
179
180 Here are notes on [[evaluation order]] that make the choice of which
181 lambda to reduce next the selection of a route through a network of
182 links.
183
184
185 ##More on evaluation strategies##
186
187 Here (below) are notes on [[evaluation order]] that make the choice of which
188 lambda to reduce next the selection of a route through a network of
189 links.
190
191
192 More on Evaluation Order
193 ========================
194
195 This discussion elaborates on the discussion of evaluation order in the
196 class notes from week 2.  It makes use of the reduction diagrams drawn
197 in class, which makes choice of evaluation strategy a choice of which
198 direction to move through a network of reduction links.
199
200
201 Some lambda terms can be reduced in different ways:
202
203 <pre>
204                      ((\x.x)((\y.y) z))
205                        /      \
206                       /        \
207                      /          \
208                     /            \
209                     ((\y.y) z)   ((\x.x) z)
210                       \             /
211                        \           /
212                         \         /
213                          \       /
214                           \     /
215                            \   /
216                              z
217 </pre>
218
219 But because the lambda calculus is confluent (has the diamond
220 property, named after the shape of the diagram above), no matter which
221 lambda you choose to target for reduction first, you end up at the
222 same place.  It's like travelling in Manhattan: if you walk uptown
223 first and then head east, you end up in the same place as if you walk
224 east and then head uptown.
225
226 But which lambda you target has implications for efficiency and for
227 termination.  (Later in the course, it will have implications for
228 the order in which side effects occur.)
229
230 First, efficiency:
231
232 <pre>
233                       ((\x.w)((\y.y) z))
234                         \      \
235                          \      ((\x.w) z)
236                           \       /
237                            \     /
238                             \   /
239                              \ /
240                               w
241 </pre>
242
243 If a function discards its argument (as `\x.w` does), it makes sense
244 to target that function for reduction, rather than wasting effort
245 reducing the argument only to have the result of all that work thrown
246 away.  So in this situation, the strategy of "always reduce the
247 leftmost reducible lambda" wins.
248
249 But:
250
251 <pre>
252                         ((\x.xx)((\y.y) z))
253                           /       \
254      (((\y.y) z)((\y.y) z)         ((\x.xx) z)
255         /         |                  /
256        /          (((\y.y)z)z)      /
257       /              |             /
258      /               |            /
259     /                |           /
260     (z ((\y.y)z))    |          /
261          \           |         /
262           -----------.---------
263                      |
264                      zz
265 </pre>
266
267 This time, the leftmost function `\x.xx` copies its argument.
268 If we reduce the rightmost lambda first (rightmost branch of the
269 diagram), the argument is already simplified before we do the
270 copying.  We arrive at the normal form (i.e., the form that cannot be
271 further reduced) in two steps.
272
273 But if we reduce the rightmost lambda first (the two leftmost branches
274 of the diagram), we copy the argument before it has been evaluated.
275 In effect, when we copy the unreduced argument, we double the amount
276 of work we need to do to deal with that argument.
277
278 So when the function copies its argument, the "always reduce the
279 rightmost reducible lambda" wins.
280
281 So evaluation strategies have a strong effect on how many reduction
282 steps it takes to arrive at a stopping point (e.g., normal form).
283
284 Now for termination:
285
286 <pre>
287 (\x.w)((\x.xxx)(\x.xxx))
288  |      \
289  |       (\x.w)((\x.xxx)(\x.xxx)(\x.xxx))
290  |        /      \
291  |       /        (\x.w)((\x.xxx)(\x.xxx)(\x.xxx)(\x.xxx))
292  |      /          /       \
293  .-----------------         etc.
294  |
295  w
296 </pre>
297
298 Here we have a function that discards its argument on the left, and a
299 non-terminating term on the right.  It's even more evil than Omega,
300 because it not only never reduces, it generates more and more work
301 with each so-called reduction.  If we unluckily adopt the "always
302 reduce the rightmost reducible lambda" strategy, we'll spend our days
303 relentlessly copying out new copies of \x.xxx.  But if we even once
304 reduce the leftmost reducible lambda, we'll immediately jump to the
305 normal form, `w`.
306
307 We can roughly associate the "leftmost always" strategy with call by
308 name (normal order), and the "rightmost always" strategy with call by
309 value (applicative order).  There are fine-grained distinctions among
310 these terms of art that we will not pause to untangle here.
311
312 If a term has a normal form (a reduction such that no further
313 reduction is possible), then a leftmost-always reduction will find it.
314 (That's why it's called "normal order": it's the evaluation order that
315 guarantees finding a normal form if one exists.)
316
317 Preview: if the evaluation of a function has side effects, then the
318 choice of an evaluation strategy will make a big difference in which
319 side effect occur and in which order.