5f4c9f5ddc99159bf4e357b533381956b6de44c1
[lambda.git] / how_to_get_the_programming_languages_running_on_your_computer.mdwn
1 ## Identifying your system ##
2
3 We'll assume you're using either Mac OS X, or Windows, or Linux.
4
5 If you're using **Mac OS X**, take note of what version of the Mac OS you're
6 running. (Under the Apple Menu, select "About this Mac".)
7
8 *    Leopard (10.5)
9 *    Snow Leopard (10.6)
10 *    Lion (10.7)
11 *    Mountain Lion (10.8)
12 *    Mavericks (10.9)
13 *    Yosemite (10.10)
14
15 If you're running **iOS**, you probably can't use this software on that machine. (A bit more below.)
16
17 Furthermore, Mac users will be in one of two subgroups:
18
19 *   You'll have Apple's Xcode and the independent MacPorts system
20     installed. (Probably you don't. If you don't know what I'm talking about, you don't have these.)
21     If you don't have these, but want to try this route, you can read about
22     the MacPorts system at <http://www.macports.org/>.
23     This automates the building of Unix-type software on your Mac; it
24     makes it a lot easier to check for dependencies, use more-recent
25     versions of things, and so on. (Though as it happens, MacPorts only has an older version of
26     our chosen implementation of Scheme.)
27
28     There are also other package management systems available for the Mac, notably Homebrew and Fink. I only know a little bit about them.
29
30     Xcode is available at
31     <http://developer.apple.com/technologies/tools/xcode.html>. Some
32     versions of this have been available for free, though you do have to
33     register with Apple as an "Apple Developer", which involves accepting a
34     legal agreement with Apple. I have an older version of this installed.
35     If you download a recent version, email me and let me know how the
36     process works so I can tell others. There are instructions about how to
37     get Xcode in the MacPorts installation guide.
38     <!--
39     The latest version of Xcode to work with Leopard is 3.14; more recent versions (>= 3.2) require Snow Leopard.
40     3.2.6 is last version that can be downloaded for free by users of 10.6 / Snow Leopard. (But if they pay, they can use up to Xcode 4.2.)
41     Xcode 4.1 was free to all users of 10.7 / Lion. Is Xcode 4.6.x still available for free? Are Xcode 5.x and/or 6.x available for free?
42     -->
43
44 *   Or you won't have those installed. (**Most Mac users will be in this group.**)
45     Then you'll need pre-packaged (and usually pretty GUI) installers for
46     everything. These are great when they're available and kept up-to-date;
47     however sometimes those conditions aren't met.
48
49
50
51 If you're using **Windows**, you'll be in one of two subgroups:
52
53 *   You'll have the Cygwin system
54     <http://www.cygwin.com/> installed.
55     This puts a Unix-like layer on top of your Windows system,
56     and makes it easier for you to use the same software everybody
57     else will be using, without its needing as much special-for-Windows
58     treatment. However, many of you won't have this installed.
59
60 *   You won't have Cygwin installed. (**Most Windows users will be in this group.**)
61     You might in theory have a different group of compilers installed
62     (MinGW, or Microsoft Visual C++) but we'll assume that the overwhelming
63     majority of users in this group don't have access to a compiler and
64     need pre-packaged installers for everything.
65
66
67 If you're using **Linux**, you could be using any one of numerous packaging
68 systems.
69
70 *   We'll give examples using the packaging system shared by Debian and Ubuntu,
71     and we'll assume that those of you using different packaging systems will know
72     how to make the relevant substitutions. You may also want to take note of the
73     output of the "uname -srm" command. On my machine this tells me "Linux
74     3.12.8-extrastuff x86\_64". That tells me I'm running the x86\_64 (as opposed to the
75     i686 or i386 or whatever) version of Linux, and that I'm running kernel
76     version 3.12.8.
77
78
79 **For all of these groups**, a general item to take note of is what "processor architecture" your machine is running. Three of the possibilities are:
80
81 *   One of Intel's i386, i486, i586, i686 architectures. These are collectively known as "x86" or "IA-32" or sometimes just "32-bit".
82 *   Intel or AMD's x86\_64 architecture. This is sometimes also called "x64" or "amd64" or "IA-64" or sometimes just "64-bit".
83 *   ARM or some other architecture. These are generally lower-powered machines, like iPads. Some of the software we're proposing *might* in principle be capable of running on such machines, but installers don't seem to be available. We'll assume you have access to an x86 or x86\_64 machine.
84
85 In the Linux example above, I could tell my machine is running x86 because the
86 result of the `uname` command said "i386" at the end. Another machine I have
87 says "x86\_64" at the end. On a Mac, you can also say `uname -m` in a Terminal
88 session, and it will say something like "i386". I think that Mac OS Xs from Lion
89 / 10.7 forward have all been x86\_64-only. On Windows, I don't know how to
90 collect this information. But generally, machines running Windows XP will
91 probably be i386/32-bit (unless it's a version of Windows with "64-bit" or
92 "x64" in its title); machines running Windows Vista or Windows 7 or Windows 8
93 could be running either x86/32-bit or x64/64-bit.
94 (Update: I found
95 [this Microsoft page](http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/32-bit-and-64-bit-windows)
96 that may help.)
97
98
99 ## PLEASE REPORT PROBLEMS (AND SOLUTIONS!) ##
100
101 We haven't tested these instructions ourselves, and they're not explicit
102 step-by-step instructions in any case. If you encounter troubles, please email
103 to let us know so that we can amend the instructions to help others. If you
104 figure out how to fix the problem youself (and please do), please also write
105 with suggestions how we can change these instructions to make the process
106 easier and more straightforward for others.
107
108
109 ## Getting Scheme ##
110
111 **Scheme** is one of two or three major dialects of *Lisp*, which is a large family
112 of programming languages. The other dialects are called "Common Lisp" and "Clojure".
113 Scheme is the more clean and minimalist dialect, and is what's mostly used in
114 academic circles.
115 Scheme itself has umpteen different "implementations", which share most of
116 their fundamentals, but have slightly different extensions and interact with
117 the operating system differently. One major implementation is called Racket,
118 and that is what we recommend you use. (A few years back they were called PLT Scheme, but then
119 they changed their name to Racket.)
120 If you're already using or comfortable with
121 another Scheme implementation, though, there's no compelling reason to switch.
122
123 If for some reason you have problems with Racket, other implementations you could
124 try are
125 [Chicken](http://www.call-cc.org),
126 [Gauche](http://practical-scheme.net/gauche),
127 or [Chibi](https://code.google.com/p/chibi-scheme). The later in that list you go, the more likely it
128 is that you'll have to compile the software yourself. (Thus Mac users will need Xcode.)
129
130 Racket stands to Scheme in something like the relation Firefox stands to HTML. It's one program among others for working with the language; and many of those programs (or web browsers) permit different extensions, have small variations, and so on.
131
132 Racket has several components. The two most visible components for us are a command-line interpreter named "racket" and a teaching-friendly editor/front-end named "DrRacket". You will probably be working primarily or wholly in the latter.
133 <!-- "racket" used to be mzscheme, "DrRacket" used to be DrScheme -->
134
135 The current version of Racket is 6.1.1 (released November 2014).
136
137 *   In your web browser:
138
139     There is a (slow, bare-bones) version of Scheme available for online use at <http://tryscheme.sourceforge.net/>.
140
141 *   **To install in Windows**
142
143     Go to <http://racket-lang.org/download/>. Download and install the "Windows x64" version. (Or the "Windows x86" verson if you have an older, 32-bit system.)
144
145 *   **To install on Mac without MacPorts**
146
147     Go to <http://racket-lang.org/download/>. Download and install the option for your system, most likely "Macintosh
148     OS X (Intel 64-bit)".
149
150 *   **To install on Mac with MacPorts**
151
152     Unfortunately, MacPorts doesn't have Racket itself available. It only has an older version from when they still called
153     themselves PLT Scheme. And even then, it only has the command-line program "mzscheme" (what's nowadays called "racket"); it
154     doesn't have the GUI program that corresponds to what's now called "DrRacket". You can install mzscheme by opening a Terminal
155     window and typing:
156
157          sudo port install mzscheme
158
159     If you want the GUI components, I think you'll need to use the
160     "Mac/without MacPorts" installation options above.
161
162     I recommend also typing:
163
164         sudo port install rlwrap
165
166     then if you ever use the command-line program `mzscheme` (or `racket`), you should start it by typing `rlwrap mzscheme`. This gives
167     you a nice history of the commands you've already typed, which you can scroll up and down in with your
168     keyboard arrows.
169
170 *   **To install on Linux**
171
172     Use your packaging system, for example, open a Terminal and
173     type:
174
175          sudo apt-get install racket
176
177     It's very likely that your packaging system has some version of
178     Racket available, so look for it. However, if you can't find it you
179     can also install a pre-packaged binary from the Racket website at <http://racket-lang.org/download/>.
180     Choose the option for your version of Linux (Ubuntu and Debian are available).
181
182     As above, I recommend you also type:
183
184         sudo apt-get rlwrap
185
186     then if you ever use the command-line program `mzscheme` (or `racket`), you should start it by typing `rlwrap mzscheme`. This gives
187     you a nice history of the commands you've already typed, which you can scroll up and down in with your
188     keyboard arrows.
189
190
191 ## Getting OCaml ##
192
193 **Caml** is one of two major dialects of *ML*, which is another large family of
194 programming languages. The other dialect is called "SML" and has several
195 implementations. But Caml has only one active implementation, OCaml or
196 Objective Caml, developed by the INRIA academic group in France.
197 Sometimes we may refer to Caml or ML
198 more generally; but you can assume that what we're talking about always works more
199 specifically in OCaml.
200
201 It's helpful if in addition to OCaml you also install the Findlib add-on.
202 This will make it easier to install additional add-ons further down the road.
203 However, if you're not able to get that working, don't worry about it much.
204
205 The current version of OCaml is 4.02.1 (released October 2014).
206
207 Another instruction page focuses on [OPAM](http://ocaml.org/docs/install.html), also [this](https://opam.ocaml.org).
208
209 *   In your web browser:
210
211     There is a (slow, bare-bones) version of OCaml available for online use at <http://try.ocamlpro.com/>.
212
213 *   **To install in Windows**
214
215     Go to <http://caml.inria.fr/download.en.html>.
216     You can probably download and install the
217     "Self installer for the port based on the MinGW toolchain"
218     even if you don't know what MinGW or Cygwin are.
219     Some features of this require Cygwin, but it looks like
220     it should mostly work even for users without Cygwin.
221     At the time of this writing, only an installer for the previous
222     version of OCaml (3.11.0, from January 2010) is available.
223
224     To install the Findlib add-on, you must have the
225     Cygwin system installed. We assume few of you do,
226     so we're not going to try to explain how to do this.
227     If you want to figure it out yourself, go to the
228     Findlib website at <http://projects.camlcity.org/projects/findlib.html>.
229
230 *   **To install on Mac without MacPorts**
231
232     To install OCaml 3.12 (just released this summer), go to
233     <http://caml.inria.fr/download.en.html>
234     and download and install the "Binary distribution for Mac OS X"
235
236     To install the Findlib add-on, you'll need the Xcode development tools
237     to compile it yourself. Once you get that far, it's probably easiest
238     for you to install MacPorts and just install things using the MacPorts
239     instructions. (Use the MacPorts version of OCaml, instead of installing
240     the package from the caml.inria.fr website, as described above)
241     However, if you do have Xcode, and want to do without MacPorts, then
242     what you need to do is download Findlib from
243     <http://download.camlcity.org/download/findlib-1.2.6.tar.gz>.
244     Unpack the download, open a Terminal and go into the folder you just
245     unpacked, and type:
246
247         ./configure
248         make package-macosx
249
250     This will build an installer package which you should be able to
251     double-click and install.
252
253 *   **To install on Mac with MacPorts**
254
255     You can install the previous version of OCaml (3.11.2,
256     from January 2010), together with the Findlib add-on, by opening a Terminal
257     and typing:
258
259         sudo port install ocaml caml-findlib
260
261     As with Scheme, it's helpful to also have rlwrap installed, and to start OCaml as `rlwrap ocaml`. This gives
262     you a nice history of the commands you've already typed, which you can scroll up and down in with your
263     keyboard arrows.
264
265 *   [More details about installing OCaml on Macs, if needed](http://cocan.org/getting_started_with_ocaml_on_mac_os_x)
266
267 *   **To install on Linux**
268
269     Use your packaging system, for example, open a Terminal and
270     type:
271
272         sudo apt-get install ocaml ocaml-findlib
273
274     That will install a version of OCaml and the Findlib add-on.
275
276     If for some reason you can't get OCaml through your
277     packaging system, you can go to
278     <http://caml.inria.fr/download.en.html>.
279     Pre-packaged binary installers are available for several Linux systems.
280
281     If you can't get findlib through your packaging system, you'll
282     need to download it from
283     <http://download.camlcity.org/download/findlib-1.2.6.tar.gz>.
284     and use gcc to compile it yourself. If you don't know how to
285     do that, you probably don't want to attempt this.
286     Here are the INSTALL notes:
287     <https://godirepo.camlcity.org/svn/lib-findlib/trunk/INSTALL>.
288
289     As with Scheme, it's helpful to also have rlwrap installed, and to start OCaml as `rlwrap ocaml`. This gives
290     you a nice history of the commands you've already typed, which you can scroll up and down in with your
291     keyboard arrows.
292
293
294 ## Getting Haskell ##
295
296 This last step is less crucial than the others, since we will be focusing
297 primarily on Scheme and OCaml. However we, and the readings you come across,
298 will sometimes mention Haskell, so it might be worth your installing this too,
299 so that you have it available to play around with.
300
301 Haskell is used a lot in the academic contexts we'll be working through. At one point, Scheme
302 dominated these discussions but now Haskell seems to do that.
303
304 Haskell's surface syntax differs from Caml, and there are various important things one can do in
305 each of Haskell and Caml that one can't (or can't as easily) do in the
306 other. But these languages also have *a lot* in common, and if you're
307 familiar with one of them, it's generally not hard to move between it and the
308 other.
309
310 *   In your web browser:
311
312     There is a (slow, bare-bones) version of Haskell available for online use at <http://tryhaskell.org/>.
313
314 sudo apk-get install haskell-platform
315
316 <https://github.com/pittsburgh-haskell/haskell-installation>
317
318 <https://www.haskell.org/platform>
319
320 Getting started: <https://wiki.haskell.org/Haskell_in_5_steps>
321
322