tweak tree_monadize.ml
[lambda.git] / from_list_zippers_to_continuations.mdwn
1 Refunctionalizing zippers: from lists to continuations
2 ------------------------------------------------------
3
4 If zippers are continuations reified (defuntionalized), then one route
5 to continuations is to re-functionalize a zipper.  Then the
6 concreteness and understandability of the zipper provides a way of
7 understanding an equivalent treatment using continuations.
8
9 Let's work with lists of `char`s for a change.  We'll sometimes write
10 "abSd" as an abbreviation for  
11 `['a'; 'b'; 'S'; 'd']`.
12
13 We will set out to compute a deceptively simple-seeming **task: given a
14 string, replace each occurrence of 'S' in that string with a copy of
15 the string up to that point.**
16
17 We'll define a function `t` (for "task") that maps strings to their
18 updated version.
19
20 Expected behavior:
21
22         t "abSd" ~~> "ababd"
23
24
25 In linguistic terms, this is a kind of anaphora
26 resolution, where `'S'` is functioning like an anaphoric element, and
27 the preceding string portion is the antecedent.
28
29 This task can give rise to considerable complexity.
30 Note that it matters which 'S' you target first (the position of the *
31 indicates the targeted 'S'):
32
33             t "aSbS"
34                 *
35         ~~> t "aabS"
36                   *
37         ~~> "aabaab"
38
39 versus
40
41             t "aSbS"
42                   *
43         ~~> t "aSbaSb"
44                 *
45         ~~> t "aabaSb"
46                    *
47         ~~> "aabaaabab"
48
49 versus
50
51             t "aSbS"
52                   *
53         ~~> t "aSbaSb"
54                    *
55         ~~> t "aSbaaSbab"
56                     *
57         ~~> t "aSbaaaSbaabab"
58                      *
59         ~~> ...
60
61 Apparently, this task, as simple as it is, is a form of computation,
62 and the order in which the `'S'`s get evaluated can lead to divergent
63 behavior.
64
65 For now, we'll agree to always evaluate the leftmost `'S'`, which
66 guarantees termination, and a final string without any `'S'` in it.
67
68 This is a task well-suited to using a zipper.  We'll define a function
69 `tz` (for task with zippers), which accomplishes the task by mapping a
70 `char list zipper` to a `char list`.  We'll call the two parts of the
71 zipper `unzipped` and `zipped`; we start with a fully zipped list, and
72 move elements to the unzipped part by pulling the zipper down until the
73 entire list has been unzipped, at which point the zipped half of the
74 zipper will be empty.
75
76         type 'a list_zipper = ('a list) * ('a list);;
77         
78         let rec tz (z : char list_zipper) =
79           match z with
80             | (unzipped, []) -> List.rev(unzipped) (* Done! *)
81             | (unzipped, 'S'::zipped) -> tz ((List.append unzipped unzipped), zipped)
82             | (unzipped, target::zipped) -> tz (target::unzipped, zipped);; (* Pull zipper *)
83         
84         # tz ([], ['a'; 'b'; 'S'; 'd']);;
85         - : char list = ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']
86         
87         # tz ([], ['a'; 'S'; 'b'; 'S']);;
88         - : char list = ['a'; 'a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'a'; 'b']
89
90 Note that the direction in which the zipper unzips enforces the
91 evaluate-leftmost rule.  Task completed.
92
93 One way to see exactly what is going on is to watch the zipper in
94 action by tracing the execution of `tz`.  By using the `#trace`
95 directive in the OCaml interpreter, the system will print out the
96 arguments to `tz` each time it is called, including when it is called
97 recursively within one of the `match` clauses.  Note that the
98 lines with left-facing arrows (`<--`) show (both initial and recursive) calls to `tz`,
99 giving the value of its argument (a zipper), and the lines with
100 right-facing arrows (`-->`) show the output of each recursive call, a
101 simple list.
102
103         # #trace tz;;
104         t1 is now traced.
105         # tz ([], ['a'; 'b'; 'S'; 'd']);;
106         tz <-- ([], ['a'; 'b'; 'S'; 'd'])       (* Initial call *)
107         tz <-- (['a'], ['b'; 'S'; 'd'])         (* Pull zipper *)
108         tz <-- (['b'; 'a'], ['S'; 'd'])         (* Pull zipper *)
109         tz <-- (['b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'a'], ['d'])    (* Special 'S' step *)
110         tz <-- (['d'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'a'], [])  (* Pull zipper *)
111         tz --> ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']        (* Output reversed *)
112         tz --> ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']
113         tz --> ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']
114         tz --> ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']
115         tz --> ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']
116         - : char list = ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b'; 'd']
117
118 The nice thing about computations involving lists is that it's so easy
119 to visualize them as a data structure.  Eventually, we want to get to
120 a place where we can talk about more abstract computations.  In order
121 to get there, we'll first do the exact same thing we just did with
122 concrete zipper using procedures instead.
123
124 Think of a list as a procedural recipe: `['a'; 'b'; 'c'; 'd']` is the result of
125 the computation `'a'::('b'::('c'::('d'::[])))` (or, in our old style,
126 `make_list 'a' (make_list 'b' (make_list 'c' (make_list 'd' empty)))`). The
127 recipe for constructing the list goes like this:
128
129 >       (0)  Start with the empty list []  
130 >       (1)  make a new list whose first element is 'd' and whose tail is the list constructed in step (0)  
131 >       (2)  make a new list whose first element is 'c' and whose tail is the list constructed in step (1)  
132 >       -----------------------------------------  
133 >       (3)  make a new list whose first element is 'b' and whose tail is the list constructed in step (2)  
134 >       (4)  make a new list whose first element is 'a' and whose tail is the list constructed in step (3)
135
136 What is the type of each of these steps?  Well, it will be a function
137 from the result of the previous step (a list) to a new list: it will
138 be a function of type `char list -> char list`.  We'll call each step
139 (or group of steps) a **continuation** of the previous steps.  So in this
140 context, a continuation is a function of type `char list -> char
141 list`.  For instance, the continuation corresponding to the portion of
142 the recipe below the horizontal line is the function `fun (tail : char
143 list) -> 'a'::('b'::tail)`. What is the continuation of the 4th step? That is, after we've built up `'a'::('b'::('c'::('d'::[])))`, what more has to happen to that for it to become the list `['a'; 'b'; 'c'; 'd']`? Nothing! Its continuation is the function that does nothing: `fun tail -> tail`.
144
145 In what follows, we'll be thinking about the result list that we're building up in this procedural way. We'll treat our input list just as a plain old static list data structure, that we recurse through in the normal way we're accustomed to. We won't need a zipper data structure, because the continuation-based representation of our result list will take over the same role.
146
147 So our new function `tc` (for task with continuations) takes an input list (not a zipper) and a also takes a continuation `k` (it's conventional to use `k` for continuation variables). `k` is a function that represents how the result list is going to continue being built up after this invocation of `tc` delivers up a value. When we invoke `tc` for the first time, we expect it to deliver as a value the very de-S'd list we're seeking, so the way for the list to continue being built up is for nothing to happen to it. That is, our initial invocation of `tc` will supply `fun tail -> tail` as the value for `k`. Here is the whole `tc` function. Its structure and behavior follows `tz` from above, which we've repeated here to facilitate detailed comparison:
148
149         let rec tz (z : char list_zipper) =
150             match z with
151             | (unzipped, []) -> List.rev(unzipped) (* Done! *)
152             | (unzipped, 'S'::zipped) -> tz ((List.append unzipped unzipped), zipped)
153             | (unzipped, target::zipped) -> tz (target::unzipped, zipped);; (* Pull zipper *)
154         
155         let rec tc (l: char list) (k: (char list) -> (char list)) =
156             match l with
157             | [] -> List.rev (k [])
158             | 'S'::zipped -> tc zipped (fun tail -> k (k tail))
159             | target::zipped -> tc zipped (fun tail -> target::(k tail));;
160         
161         # tc ['a'; 'b'; 'S'; 'd'] (fun tail -> tail);;
162         - : char list = ['a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'b']
163         
164         # tc ['a'; 'S'; 'b'; 'S'] (fun tail -> tail);;
165         - : char list = ['a'; 'a'; 'b'; 'a'; 'a'; 'b']
166
167 To emphasize the parallel, we've re-used the names `zipped` and
168 `target`.  The trace of the procedure will show that these variables
169 take on the same values in the same series of steps as they did during
170 the execution of `tz` above: there will once again be one initial and
171 four recursive calls to `tc`, and `zipped` will take on the values
172 `"bSd"`, `"Sd"`, `"d"`, and `""` (and, once again, on the final call,
173 the first `match` clause will fire, so the the variable `zipped` will
174 not be instantiated).
175
176 We have not named the continuation argument `unzipped`, although that is
177 what the parallel would suggest.  The reason is that `unzipped` (in
178 `tz`) is a list, but `k` (in `tc`) is a function.  That's the most crucial 
179 difference between the solutions---it's the
180 point of the excercise, and it should be emphasized.  For instance,
181 you can see this difference in the fact that in `tz`, we have to glue
182 together the two instances of `unzipped` with an explicit (and,
183 computationally speaking, relatively inefficient) `List.append`.
184 In the `tc` version of the task, we simply compose `k` with itself:
185 `k o k = fun tail -> k (k tail)`.
186
187 A call `tc ['a'; 'b'; 'S'; 'd']` would yield a partially-applied function; it would still wait for another argument, a continuation of type `char list -> char list`. So we have to give it an "initial continuation" to get started. As mentioned above, we supply *the identity function* as the initial continuation. Why did we choose that? Again, if
188 you have already constructed the result list `"ababd"`, what's the desired continuation? What's the next step in the recipe to produce the desired result, i.e, the very same list, `"ababd"`?  Clearly, the identity function.
189
190 A good way to test your understanding is to figure out what the
191 continuation function `k` must be at the point in the computation when
192 `tc` is applied to the argument `"Sd"`.  Two choices: is it
193 `fun tail -> 'a'::'b'::tail`, or it is `fun tail -> 'b'::'a'::tail`?  The way to see if you're right is to execute the following command and see what happens:
194
195     tc ['S'; 'd'] (fun tail -> 'a'::'b'::tail);;
196
197 There are a number of interesting directions we can go with this task.
198 The reason this task was chosen is because the task itself (as opposed
199 to the functions used to implement the task) can be viewed as a
200 simplified picture of a computation using continuations, where `'S'`
201 plays the role of a continuation operator. (It works like the Scheme
202 operators `shift` or `control`; the differences between them don't
203 manifest themselves in this example.
204 See Ken Shan's paper [Shift to control](http://www.cs.rutgers.edu/~ccshan/recur/recur.pdf),
205 which inspired some of the discussion in this topic.)
206 In the analogy, the input list portrays a
207 sequence of functional applications, where `[f1; f2; f3; x]` represents
208 `f1(f2(f3 x))`.  The limitation of the analogy is that it is only
209 possible to represent computations in which the applications are
210 always right-branching, i.e., the computation `((f1 f2) f3) x` cannot
211 be directly represented.
212
213 One way to extend this exercise would be to add a special symbol `'#'`,
214 and then the task would be to copy from the target `'S'` only back to
215 the closest `'#'`.  This would allow our task to simulate delimited
216 continuations with embedded `prompt`s (also called `reset`s).
217
218 The reason the task is well-suited to the list zipper is in part
219 because the List monad has an intimate connection with continuations.
220 We'll explore this next.
221
222