uncurry f for Kapulet
[lambda.git] / _what_is_functional.mdwn
1 *This page is not ready to go live; just roughly copying over some material from last year.*
2
3
4 Declarative/functional vs Imperatival/dynamic models of computation
5 ===================================================================
6
7 Many of you, like us, will have grown up thinking the paradigm of computation is a sequence of changes. Let go of that. It will take some care to separate the operative notion of "sequencing" here from other notions close to it, but once that's done, you'll see that languages that have no significant notions of sequencing or changes are Turing complete: they can perform any computation we know how to describe. In itself, that only puts them on equal footing with more mainstream, imperatival programming languages like C and Java and Python, which are also Turing complete. But further, the languages we want you to become familiar with can reasonably be understood to be more fundamental. They embody the elemental building blocks that computer scientists use when reasoning about and designing other languages.
8
9 Jim offered the metaphor: think of imperatival languages, which include "mutation" and "side-effects" (we'll flesh out these keywords as we proceeed), as the pâté of computation. We want to teach you about the meat and potatoes, where as it turns out there is no sequencing and no changes. There's just the evaluation or simplification of complex expressions.
10
11 Now, when you ask the Scheme interpreter to simplify an expression for you, that's a kind of dynamic interaction between you and the interpreter. You may wonder then why these languages should not also be understood imperatively. The difference is that in a purely declarative or functional language, there are no dynamic effects in the language itself. It's just a static semantic fact about the language that one expression reduces to another. You may have verified that fact through your dynamic interactions with the Scheme interpreter, but that's different from saying that there are dynamic effects in the language itself.
12
13 What the latter would amount to will become clearer as we build our way up to languages which are genuinely imperatival or dynamic.
14
15 Many of the slogans and keywords we'll encounter in discussions of these issues call for careful interpretation. They mean various different things.
16
17 For example, you'll encounter the claim that declarative languages are distinguished by their **referential transparency.** What's meant by this is not always exactly the same, and as a cluster, it's related to but not the same as this means for philosophers and linguists.
18
19 The notion of **function** that we'll be working with will be one that, by default, sometimes counts as non-identical functions that map all their inputs to the very same outputs. For example, two functions from jumbled decks of cards to sorted decks of cards may use different algorithms and hence be different functions.
20
21 It's possible to enhance the lambda calculus so that functions do get identified when they map all the same inputs to the same outputs. This is called making the calculus **extensional**. Church called languages which didn't do this **intensional**. If you try to understand that kind of "intensionality" in terms of functions from worlds to extensions (an idea also associated with Church), you may hurt yourself. So too if you try to understand it in terms of mental stereotypes, another notion sometimes designated by "intension."
22
23 It's often said that dynamic systems are distinguished because they are the ones in which **order matters**. However, there are many ways in which order can matter. If we have a trivalent boolean system, for example---easily had in a purely functional calculus---we might choose to give a truth-table like this for "and":
24
25         true and true   = true
26         true and *      = *
27         true and false  = false
28         * and true      = *
29         * and *         = *
30         * and false     = *
31         false and true  = false
32         false and *     = false
33         false and false = false
34
35 And then we'd notice that `* and false` has a different intepretation than `false and *`. (The same phenomenon is already present with the material conditional in bivalent logics; but seeing that a non-symmetric semantics for `and` is available even for functional languages is instructive.)
36
37 Another way in which order can matter that's present even in functional languages is that the interpretation of some complex expressions can depend on the order in which sub-expressions are evaluated. Evaluated in one order, the computations might never terminate (and so semantically we interpret them as having "the bottom value"---we'll discuss this). Evaluated in another order, they might have a perfectly mundane value. Here's an example, though we'll reserve discussion of it until later:
38
39         (\x. y) ((\x. x x) (\x. x x))
40
41 Again, these facts are all part of the metatheory of purely functional languages. But *there is* a different sense of "order matters" such that it's only in imperatival languages that order so matters.
42
43         x := 2
44         x := x + 1
45         x == 3
46
47 Here the comparison in the last line will evaluate to true.
48
49         x := x + 1
50         x := 2
51         x == 3
52
53 Here the comparison in the last line will evaluate to false.
54
55 One of our goals for this course is to get you to understand *what is* that new
56 sense such that only so matters in imperatival languages.
57
58 Finally, you'll see the term **dynamic** used in a variety of ways in the literature for this course:
59
60 *       dynamic versus static typing
61
62 *       dynamic versus lexical [[!wikipedia Scope (programming) desc="scoping"]]
63
64 *       dynamic versus static control operators
65
66 *       finally, we're used ourselves to talking about dynamic versus static semantics
67
68 For the most part, these uses are only loosely connected to each other. We'll tend to use "imperatival" to describe the kinds of semantic properties made available in dynamic semantics, languages which have robust notions of sequencing changes, and so on.
69
70 To read further about the relation between declarative or functional programming, on the one hand, and imperatival programming on the other, you can begin here:
71
72 *       [[!wikipedia Declarative programming]]
73 *       [[!wikipedia Functional programming]]
74 *       [[!wikipedia Purely functional]]
75 *       [[!wikipedia Referential transparency (computer science)]]
76 *       [[!wikipedia Imperative programming]]
77 *       [[!wikipedia Side effect (computer science) desc="Side effects"]]
78
79
80 Map
81 ===
82
83 <table>
84 <tr>
85 <td width=30%>Scheme (functional part)</td>
86 <td width=30%>OCaml (functional part)</td>
87 <td width=30%>C, Java, Python<br>
88 Scheme (imperative part)<br>
89 OCaml (imperative part)</td>
90 <tr>
91 <td width=30%>untyped lambda calculus<br>
92 combinatorial logic</td>
93 <tr>
94 <td colspan=3 align=center>--------------------------------------------------- Turing complete ---------------------------------------------------</td>
95 <tr>
96 <td width=30%>&nbsp;
97 <td width=30%>more advanced type systems, such as polymorphic types
98 <td width=30%>&nbsp;
99 <tr>
100 <td width=30%>&nbsp;
101 <td width=30%>simply-typed lambda calculus (what linguists mostly use)
102 <td width=30%>&nbsp;
103 </table>
104
105
106 Declarative/functional vs Imperatival/dynamic models of computation
107 ===================================================================
108
109 Many of you, like us, will have grown up thinking the paradigm of computation is a sequence of changes. Let go of that. It will take some care to separate the operative notion of "sequencing" here from other notions close to it, but once that's done, you'll see that languages that have no significant notions of sequencing or changes are Turing complete: they can perform any computation we know how to describe. In itself, that only puts them on equal footing with more mainstream, imperatival programming languages like C and Java and Python, which are also Turing complete. But further, the languages we want you to become familiar with can reasonably be understood to be more fundamental. They embody the elemental building blocks that computer scientists use when reasoning about and designing other languages.
110
111 Jim offered the metaphor: think of imperatival languages, which include "mutation" and "side-effects" (we'll flesh out these keywords as we proceeed), as the p&acirc;t&eacute; of computation. We want to teach you about the meat and potatoes, where as it turns out there is no sequencing and no changes. There's just the evaluation or simplification of complex expressions.
112
113 Now, when you ask the Scheme interpreter to simplify an expression for you, that's a kind of dynamic interaction between you and the interpreter. You may wonder then why these languages should not also be understood imperatively. The difference is that in a purely declarative or functional language, there are no dynamic effects in the language itself. It's just a static semantic fact about the language that one expression reduces to another. You may have verified that fact through your dynamic interactions with the Scheme interpreter, but that's different from saying that there are dynamic effects in the language itself.
114
115 What the latter would amount to will become clearer as we build our way up to languages which are genuinely imperatival or dynamic.
116
117 Many of the slogans and keywords we'll encounter in discussions of these issues call for careful interpretation. They mean various different things.
118
119 For example, you'll encounter the claim that declarative languages are distinguished by their **referential transparency.** What's meant by this is not always exactly the same, and as a cluster, it's related to but not the same as this means for philosophers and linguists.
120
121 The notion of **function** that we'll be working with will be one that, by default, sometimes counts as non-identical functions that map all their inputs to the very same outputs. For example, two functions from jumbled decks of cards to sorted decks of cards may use different algorithms and hence be different functions.
122
123 It's possible to enhance the lambda calculus so that functions do get identified when they map all the same inputs to the same outputs. This is called making the calculus **extensional**. Church called languages which didn't do this **intensional**. If you try to understand that kind of "intensionality" in terms of functions from worlds to extensions (an idea also associated with Church), you may hurt yourself. So too if you try to understand it in terms of mental stereotypes, another notion sometimes designated by "intension."
124
125 It's often said that dynamic systems are distinguished because they are the ones in which **order matters**. However, there are many ways in which order can matter. If we have a trivalent boolean system, for example---easily had in a purely functional calculus---we might choose to give a truth-table like this for "and":
126
127         true and true   = true
128         true and *      = *
129         true and false  = false
130         * and true      = *
131         * and *         = *
132         * and false     = *
133         false and true  = false
134         false and *     = false
135         false and false = false
136
137 And then we'd notice that `* and false` has a different intepretation than `false and *`. (The same phenomenon is already present with the material conditional in bivalent logics; but seeing that a non-symmetric semantics for `and` is available even for functional languages is instructive.)
138
139 Another way in which order can matter that's present even in functional languages is that the interpretation of some complex expressions can depend on the order in which sub-expressions are evaluated. Evaluated in one order, the computations might never terminate (and so semantically we interpret them as having "the bottom value"---we'll discuss this). Evaluated in another order, they might have a perfectly mundane value. Here's an example, though we'll reserve discussion of it until later:
140
141         (\x. y) ((\x. x x) (\x. x x))
142
143 Again, these facts are all part of the metatheory of purely functional languages. But *there is* a different sense of "order matters" such that it's only in imperatival languages that order so matters.
144
145         x := 2
146         x := x + 1
147         x == 3
148
149 Here the comparison in the last line will evaluate to true.
150
151         x := x + 1
152         x := 2
153         x == 3
154
155 Here the comparison in the last line will evaluate to false.
156
157 One of our goals for this course is to get you to understand *what is* that new
158 sense such that only so matters in imperatival languages.
159
160 Finally, you'll see the term **dynamic** used in a variety of ways in the literature for this course:
161
162 *       dynamic versus static typing
163
164 *       dynamic versus lexical [[!wikipedia Scope (programming) desc="scoping"]]
165
166 *       dynamic versus static control operators
167
168 *       finally, we're used ourselves to talking about dynamic versus static semantics
169
170 For the most part, these uses are only loosely connected to each other. We'll tend to use "imperatival" to describe the kinds of semantic properties made available in dynamic semantics, languages which have robust notions of sequencing changes, and so on.
171
172 To read further about the relation between declarative or functional programming, on the one hand, and imperatival programming on the other, you can begin here:
173
174 *       [[!wikipedia Declarative programming]]
175 *       [[!wikipedia Functional programming]]
176 *       [[!wikipedia Purely functional]]
177 *       [[!wikipedia Referential transparency (computer science)]]
178 *       [[!wikipedia Imperative programming]]
179 *       [[!wikipedia Side effect (computer science) desc="Side effects"]]
180
181
182 Map
183 ===
184
185 <table>
186 <tr>
187 <td width=30%>Scheme (functional part)</td>
188 <td width=30%>OCaml (functional part)</td>
189 <td width=30%>C, Java, Python<br>
190 Scheme (imperative part)<br>
191 OCaml (imperative part)</td>
192 <tr>
193 <td width=30%>untyped lambda calculus<br>
194 combinatorial logic</td>
195 <tr>
196 <td colspan=3 align=center>--------------------------------------------------- Turing complete ---------------------------------------------------</td>
197 <tr>
198 <td width=30%>&nbsp;
199 <td width=30%>more advanced type systems, such as polymorphic types
200 <td width=30%>&nbsp;
201 <tr>
202 <td width=30%>&nbsp;
203 <td width=30%>simply-typed lambda calculus (what linguists mostly use)
204 <td width=30%>&nbsp;
205 </table>
206
207
208
209 What "sequencing" is and isn't
210 ------------------------------
211
212 We mentioned before the idea that computation is a sequencing of some changes. I said we'd be discussing (fragments of, and in some cases, entire) languages that have no native notion of change.
213
214 Neither do they have any useful notion of sequencing. But what this would be takes some care to identify.
215
216 First off, the mere concatenation of expressions isn't what we mean by sequencing. Concatenation of expressions is how you build syntactically complex expressions out of simpler ones. The complex expressions often express a computation where a function is applied to one (or more) arguments,
217
218 Second, the kind of rebinding we called "shadowing" doesn't involve any changes or sequencing. All the precedence facts about that kind of rebinding are just consequences of the compound syntactic structures in which it occurs.
219
220 Third, the kinds of bindings we see in:
221
222         (define foo A)
223         (foo 2)
224
225 Or even:
226
227         (define foo A)
228         (define foo B)
229         (foo 2)
230
231 don't involve any changes or sequencing in the sense we're trying to identify. As we said, these programs are just syntactic variants of (single) compound syntactic structures involving `let`s and `lambda`s.
232
233 Since Scheme and OCaml also do permit imperatival constructions, they do have syntax for genuine sequencing. In Scheme it looks like this:
234
235         (begin A B C)
236
237 In OCaml it looks like this:
238
239         begin A; B; C end
240
241 Or this:
242
243         (A; B; C)
244
245 In the presence of imperatival elements, sequencing order is very relevant. For example, these will behave differently:
246
247         (begin (print "under") (print "water"))
248         
249         (begin (print "water") (print "under"))
250
251 And so too these:
252
253         begin x := 3; x := 2; x end
254
255         begin x := 2; x := 3; x end
256
257 However, if A and B are purely functional, non-imperatival expressions, then:
258
259         begin A; B; C end
260
261 just evaluates to C (so long as A and B evaluate to something at all). So:
262
263         begin A; B; C end
264
265 contributes no more to a larger context in which it's embedded than C does. This is the sense in which functional languages have no serious notion of sequencing.
266
267 We'll discuss this more as the seminar proceeds.
268
269
270
271