some rewrites, not finished
[lambda.git] / _rosetta1.mdwn
1 *This page is not ready to go live; just roughly copying over some material from last year.*
2
3
4 Rosetta Stone
5 =============
6
7 Here's how it looks to say the same thing in various of these languages.
8
9 The following site may be useful; it lets you run a Scheme interpreter inside your web browser: [Try Scheme in your web browser](http://tryscheme.sourceforge.net/). See also our links about [[learning Scheme]] and [[learning OCaml]].
10
11  
12
13 1.      Function application and parentheses
14
15         In Scheme and the lambda calculus, the functions you're applying always go to the left. So you write `(foo 2)` and also `(+ 2 3)`.
16
17         Mostly that's how OCaml is written too:
18
19                 foo 2
20
21         But a few familiar binary operators can be written infix, so:
22
23                 2 + 3
24
25         You can also write them operator-leftmost, if you put them inside parentheses to help the parser understand you:
26
27                 ( + ) 2 3
28
29         I'll mostly do this, for uniformity with Scheme and the lambda calculus.
30
31         In OCaml and the lambda calculus, this:
32
33                 foo 2 3
34
35         means the same as:
36
37                 ((foo 2) 3)
38
39         These functions are "curried". `foo 2` returns a `2`-fooer, which waits for an argument like `3` and then foos `2` to it. `( + ) 2` returns a `2`-adder, which waits for an argument like `3` and then adds `2` to it. For further reading:
40
41 *       [[!wikipedia Currying]]
42
43         In Scheme, on the other hand, there's a difference between `((foo 2) 3)` and `(foo 2 3)`. Scheme distinguishes between unary functions that return unary functions and binary functions. For our seminar purposes, it will be easiest if you confine yourself to unary functions in Scheme as much as possible.
44
45         Scheme is very sensitive to parentheses and whenever you want a function applied to any number of arguments, you need to wrap the function and its arguments in a parentheses. So you have to write `(foo 2)`; if you only say `foo 2`, Scheme won't understand you.
46
47         Scheme uses a lot of parentheses, and they are always significant, never optional. Often the parentheses mean "apply this function to these arguments," as just described. But in a moment we'll see other constructions in Scheme where the parentheses have different roles. They do lots of different work in Scheme.
48
49
50 2.      Binding suitable values to the variables `three` and `two`, and adding them.
51
52         In Scheme:
53
54                 (let* ((three 3))
55                           (let* ((two 2))
56                                    (+ three two)))
57
58         Most of the parentheses in this construction *aren't* playing the role of applying a function to some arguments---only the ones in `(+ three two)` are doing that.
59
60
61         In OCaml:
62
63                 let three = 3 in
64                         let two = 2 in
65                                 ( + ) three two
66
67         In the lambda calculus:
68
69         Here we're on our own, we don't have predefined constants like `+` and `3` and `2` to work with. We've got to build up everything from scratch. We'll be seeing how to do that over the next weeks.
70
71         But supposing you had constructed appropriate values for `+` and `3` and `2`, you'd place them in the ellided positions in:
72
73                 (((\three (\two ((... three) two))) ...) ...)
74
75         In an ordinary imperatival language like C:
76
77                 int three = 3;
78                 int two = 2;
79                 three + two;
80
81 2.      Mutation
82
83         In C this looks almost the same as what we had before:
84
85                 int x = 3;
86                 x = 2;
87
88         Here we first initialize `x` to hold the value 3; then we mutate `x` to hold a new value.
89
90         In (the imperatival part of) Scheme, this could be done as:
91
92                 (let ((x (box 3)))
93                          (set-box! x 2))
94
95         In general, mutating operations in Scheme are named with a trailing `!`. There are other imperatival constructions, though, like `(print ...)`, that don't follow that convention.
96
97         In (the imperatival part of) OCaml, this could be done as:
98
99                 let x = ref 3 in
100                         x := 2
101
102         Of course you don't need to remember any of this syntax. We're just illustrating it so that you see that in Scheme and OCaml it looks somewhat different than we had above. The difference is much more obvious than it is in C.
103
104         In the lambda calculus:
105
106         Sorry, you can't do mutation. At least, not natively. Later in the term we'll be learning how in fact, really, you can embed mutation inside the lambda calculus even though the lambda calculus has no primitive facilities for mutation.
107
108
109
110
111 3.      Anonymous functions
112
113         Functions are "first-class values" in the lambda calculus, in Scheme, and in OCaml. What that means is that they can be arguments to, and results of, other functions. They can be stored in data structures. And so on. To read further:
114
115         *       [[!wikipedia Higher-order function]]
116         *       [[!wikipedia First-class function]]
117
118         We'll begin by looking at what "anonymous" functions look like. These are functions that have not been bound as values to any variables. That is, there are no variables whose value they are.
119
120         In the lambda calculus:
121
122                 (\x M)
123
124         ---where `M` is any simple or complex expression---is anonymous. It's only when you do:
125
126                 ((\y N) (\x M))
127
128         that `(\x M)` has a "name" (it's named `y` during the evaluation of `N`).
129
130         In Scheme, the same thing is written:
131
132                 (lambda (x) M)
133
134         Not very different, right? For example, if `M` stands for `(+ 3 x)`, then here is an anonymous function that adds 3 to whatever argument it's given:
135
136                 (lambda (x) (+ 3 x))
137
138         In OCaml, we write our anonymous function like this:
139
140                 fun x -> ( + ) 3 x
141
142
143 4.      Supplying an argument to an anonymous function
144
145         Just because the functions we built aren't named doesn't mean we can't do anything with them. We can give them arguments. For example, in Scheme we can say:
146
147                 ((lambda (x) (+ 3 x)) 2)
148
149         The outermost parentheses here mean "apply the function `(lambda (x) (+ 3 x))` to the argument `2`, or equivalently, "give the value `2` as an argument to the function `(lambda (x) (+ 3 x))`.
150
151         In OCaml:
152
153                 (fun x -> ( + ) 3 x) 2
154
155
156 5.      Binding variables to values with "let"
157
158         Let's go back and re-consider this Scheme expression:
159
160                 (let* ((three 3))
161                           (let* ((two 2))
162                                    (+ three two)))
163
164         Scheme also has a simple `let` (without the ` *`), and it permits you to group several variable bindings together in a single `let`- or `let*`-statement, like this:
165
166                 (let* ((three 3) (two 2))
167                           (+ three two))
168
169         Often you'll get the same results whether you use `let*` or `let`. However, there are cases where it makes a difference, and in those cases, `let*` behaves more like you'd expect. So you should just get into the habit of consistently using that. It's also good discipline for this seminar, especially while you're learning, to write things out the longer way, like this:
170
171                 (let* ((three 3))
172                           (let* ((two 2))
173                                    (+ three two)))
174
175         However, here you've got the double parentheses in `(let* ((three 3)) ...)`. They're doubled because the syntax permits more assignments than just the assignment of the value `3` to the variable `three`. Myself I tend to use `[` and `]` for the outer of these parentheses: `(let* [(three 3)] ...)`. Scheme can be configured to parse `[...]` as if they're just more `(...)`.
176
177         It was asked in seminar if the `3` could be replaced by a more complex expression. The answer is "yes". You could also write:
178
179                 (let* [(three (+ 1 2))]
180                           (let* [(two 2)]
181                                    (+ three two)))
182
183         It was also asked whether the `(+ 1 2)` computation would be performed before or after it was bound to the variable `three`. That's a terrific question. Let's say this: both strategies could be reasonable designs for a language. We are going to discuss this carefully in coming weeks. In fact Scheme and OCaml make the same design choice. But you should think of the underlying form of the `let`-statement as not settling this by itself.
184
185         Repeating our starting point for reference:
186
187                 (let* [(three 3)]
188                           (let* [(two 2)]
189                                    (+ three two)))
190
191         Recall in OCaml this same computation was written:
192
193                 let three = 3 in
194                         let two = 2 in
195                                 ( + ) three two
196
197 6.      Binding with "let" is the same as supplying an argument to a lambda
198
199         The preceding expression in Scheme is exactly equivalent to:
200
201                 (((lambda (three) (lambda (two) (+ three two))) 3) 2)
202
203         The preceding expression in OCaml is exactly equivalent to:
204
205                 (fun three -> (fun two -> ( + ) three two)) 3 2
206
207         Read this several times until you understand it.
208
209 7.      Functions can also be bound to variables (and hence, cease being "anonymous").
210
211         In Scheme:
212
213                 (let* [(bar (lambda (x) B))] M)
214
215         then wherever `bar` occurs in `M` (and isn't rebound by a more local `let` or `lambda`), it will be interpreted as the function `(lambda (x) B)`.
216
217         Similarly, in OCaml:
218
219                 let bar = fun x -> B in
220                         M
221
222         This in Scheme:
223
224                 (let* [(bar (lambda (x) B))] (bar A))
225
226         as we've said, means the same as:
227
228                 ((lambda (bar) (bar A)) (lambda (x) B))
229
230         which beta-reduces to:
231
232                 ((lambda (x) B) A)
233
234         and that means the same as:
235
236                 (let* [(x A)] B)
237
238         in other words: evaluate `B` with `x` assigned to the value `A`.
239
240         Similarly, this in OCaml:
241
242                 let bar = fun x -> B in
243                         bar A
244
245         is equivalent to:
246
247                 (fun x -> B) A
248
249         and that means the same as:
250
251                 let x = A in
252                         B
253
254 8.      Pushing a "let"-binding from now until the end
255
256         What if you want to do something like this, in Scheme?
257
258                 (let* [(x A)] ... for the rest of the file or interactive session ...)
259
260         or this, in OCaml:
261
262                 let x = A in
263                         ... for the rest of the file or interactive session ...
264
265         Scheme and OCaml have syntactic shorthands for doing this. In Scheme it's written like this:
266
267                 (define x A)
268                 ... rest of the file or interactive session ...
269
270         In OCaml it's written like this:
271
272                 let x = A;;
273                 ... rest of the file or interactive session ...
274
275         It's easy to be lulled into thinking this is a kind of imperative construction. *But it's not!* It's really just a shorthand for the compound `let`-expressions we've already been looking at, taking the maximum syntactically permissible scope. (Compare the "dot" convention in the lambda calculus, discussed above. I'm fudging a bit here, since in Scheme `(define ...)` is really shorthand for a `letrec` epression, which we'll come to in later classes.)
276
277 9.      Some shorthand
278
279         OCaml permits you to abbreviate:
280
281                 let bar = fun x -> B in
282                         M
283
284         as:
285
286                 let bar x = B in
287                         M
288
289         It also permits you to abbreviate:
290
291                 let bar = fun x -> B;;
292
293         as:
294
295                 let bar x = B;;
296
297         Similarly, Scheme permits you to abbreviate:
298
299                 (define bar (lambda (x) B))
300
301         as:
302
303                 (define (bar x) B)
304
305         and this is the form you'll most often see Scheme definitions written in.
306
307         However, conceptually you should think backwards through the abbreviations and equivalences we've just presented.
308
309                 (define (bar x) B)
310
311         just means:
312
313                 (define bar (lambda (x) B))
314
315         which just means:
316
317                 (let* [(bar (lambda (x) B))] ... rest of the file or interactive session ...)
318
319         which just means:
320
321                 (lambda (bar) ... rest of the file or interactive session ...) (lambda (x) B)
322
323         or in other words, interpret the rest of the file or interactive session with `bar` assigned the function `(lambda (x) B)`.
324
325
326 10.     Shadowing
327
328         You can override a binding with a more inner binding to the same variable. For instance the following expression in OCaml:
329
330                 let x = 3 in
331                         let x = 2 in
332                                 x
333
334         will evaluate to 2, not to 3. It's easy to be lulled into thinking this is the same as what happens when we say in C:
335
336                 int x = 3;
337                 x = 2;
338
339         <em>but it's not the same!</em> In the latter case we have mutation, in the former case we don't. You will learn to recognize the difference as we proceed.
340
341         The OCaml expression just means:
342
343                 (fun x -> ((fun x -> x) 2) 3)
344
345         and there's no more mutation going on there than there is in:
346
347         <pre><code>&forall;x. (F x or &forall;x (not (F x)))
348         </code></pre>
349
350         When a previously-bound variable is rebound in the way we see here, that's called **shadowing**: the outer binding is shadowed during the scope of the inner binding.
351
352         See also:
353
354         *       [[!wikipedia Variable shadowing]]
355
356
357 Some more comparisons between Scheme and OCaml
358 ----------------------------------------------
359
360 *       Simple predefined values
361
362         Numbers in Scheme: `2`, `3`  
363         In OCaml: `2`, `3`
364
365         Booleans in Scheme: `#t`, `#f`  
366         In OCaml: `true`, `false`
367
368         The eighth letter in the Latin alphabet, in Scheme: `#\h`  
369         In OCaml: `'h'`
370
371 *       Compound values
372
373         These are values which are built up out of (zero or more) simple values.
374
375         Ordered pairs in Scheme: `'(2 . 3)` or `(cons 2 3)`  
376         In OCaml: `(2, 3)`
377
378         Lists in Scheme: `'(2 3)` or `(list 2 3)`  
379         In OCaml: `[2; 3]`  
380         We'll be explaining the difference between pairs and lists next week.
381
382         The empty list, in Scheme: `'()` or `(list)`  
383         In OCaml: `[]`
384
385         The string consisting just of the eighth letter of the Latin alphabet, in Scheme: `"h"`  
386         In OCaml: `"h"`
387
388         A longer string, in Scheme: `"horse"`  
389         In OCaml: `"horse"`
390
391         A shorter string, in Scheme: `""`  
392         In OCaml: `""`
393
394
395